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Processing fluency hinders subsequent recollection: an electrophysiological study.

Li B, Gao C, Wang W, Guo C - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Results from the analysis of ERP priming effects in the study phase indicated that increased perceptual processing fluency of object features, reflected by the N/P 190 priming effect, can hinder encoding activities, reflected by the LPC priming effect, which leads to worse subsequent recollection based recognition memory.These results support the idea that processing fluency can influence subsequent recognition memory and provide a potential neural mechanism underlying this effect.However, further studies are needed to examine whether processing fluency can affect subsequent familiarity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing Key Laboratory of Learning and Cognition, Department of Psychology, College of Education, Capital Normal University Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Although many behavioral studies have investigated the effect of processing fluency on subsequent recognition memory, little research has examined the neural mechanism of this phenomenon. The present study aimed to explore the electrophysiological correlates of the effects of processing fluency on subsequent recognition memory by using an event-related potential (ERP) approach. The masked repetition priming paradigm was used to manipulate processing fluency in the study phase, and the R/K paradigm was utilized to investigate which recognition memory process (familiarity or recollection) was affected by processing fluency in the test phase. Converging behavioral and ERP results indicated that increased processing fluency impaired subsequent recollection. Results from the analysis of ERP priming effects in the study phase indicated that increased perceptual processing fluency of object features, reflected by the N/P 190 priming effect, can hinder encoding activities, reflected by the LPC priming effect, which leads to worse subsequent recollection based recognition memory. These results support the idea that processing fluency can influence subsequent recognition memory and provide a potential neural mechanism underlying this effect. However, further studies are needed to examine whether processing fluency can affect subsequent familiarity.

No MeSH data available.


Event-related potential waveforms and topographic maps for basic memory effects. (A) Grand-averaged ERP waveforms for R hits, K hits, and CRs. (B) Topographic maps for FN400 (K hits minus CRs at 300–500 ms) and LPC (R hits minus K hits at 500–800 ms) for old/new effects. F, frontal electrode cluster; P, parietal electrode cluster.
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Figure 3: Event-related potential waveforms and topographic maps for basic memory effects. (A) Grand-averaged ERP waveforms for R hits, K hits, and CRs. (B) Topographic maps for FN400 (K hits minus CRs at 300–500 ms) and LPC (R hits minus K hits at 500–800 ms) for old/new effects. F, frontal electrode cluster; P, parietal electrode cluster.

Mentions: For the analysis of primary memory effects, we collapsed ERPs across prime type and prime status to compare ERPs for R hits, K hits, and correct rejections (CRs). ERPs associated with familiarity were compared between K hits and CRs, whereas ERPs associated with recollection were compared between R and K hits. Based on previous studies (Rugg et al., 1998; Woollams et al., 2008), time windows of 300–500 ms and 500–800 ms were used to index FN400 effect and parietal LPC effect, respectively. Two-way ANOVA involving response type (R/K/CR) and electrode cluster (frontal/parietal) was conducted separately for each time interval. Grand-averaged ERP waveforms of R hits, K hits, and CRs, and topographic maps of FN400 and LPC effects are shown in Figures 3A,B.


Processing fluency hinders subsequent recollection: an electrophysiological study.

Li B, Gao C, Wang W, Guo C - Front Psychol (2015)

Event-related potential waveforms and topographic maps for basic memory effects. (A) Grand-averaged ERP waveforms for R hits, K hits, and CRs. (B) Topographic maps for FN400 (K hits minus CRs at 300–500 ms) and LPC (R hits minus K hits at 500–800 ms) for old/new effects. F, frontal electrode cluster; P, parietal electrode cluster.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4478378&req=5

Figure 3: Event-related potential waveforms and topographic maps for basic memory effects. (A) Grand-averaged ERP waveforms for R hits, K hits, and CRs. (B) Topographic maps for FN400 (K hits minus CRs at 300–500 ms) and LPC (R hits minus K hits at 500–800 ms) for old/new effects. F, frontal electrode cluster; P, parietal electrode cluster.
Mentions: For the analysis of primary memory effects, we collapsed ERPs across prime type and prime status to compare ERPs for R hits, K hits, and correct rejections (CRs). ERPs associated with familiarity were compared between K hits and CRs, whereas ERPs associated with recollection were compared between R and K hits. Based on previous studies (Rugg et al., 1998; Woollams et al., 2008), time windows of 300–500 ms and 500–800 ms were used to index FN400 effect and parietal LPC effect, respectively. Two-way ANOVA involving response type (R/K/CR) and electrode cluster (frontal/parietal) was conducted separately for each time interval. Grand-averaged ERP waveforms of R hits, K hits, and CRs, and topographic maps of FN400 and LPC effects are shown in Figures 3A,B.

Bottom Line: Results from the analysis of ERP priming effects in the study phase indicated that increased perceptual processing fluency of object features, reflected by the N/P 190 priming effect, can hinder encoding activities, reflected by the LPC priming effect, which leads to worse subsequent recollection based recognition memory.These results support the idea that processing fluency can influence subsequent recognition memory and provide a potential neural mechanism underlying this effect.However, further studies are needed to examine whether processing fluency can affect subsequent familiarity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing Key Laboratory of Learning and Cognition, Department of Psychology, College of Education, Capital Normal University Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Although many behavioral studies have investigated the effect of processing fluency on subsequent recognition memory, little research has examined the neural mechanism of this phenomenon. The present study aimed to explore the electrophysiological correlates of the effects of processing fluency on subsequent recognition memory by using an event-related potential (ERP) approach. The masked repetition priming paradigm was used to manipulate processing fluency in the study phase, and the R/K paradigm was utilized to investigate which recognition memory process (familiarity or recollection) was affected by processing fluency in the test phase. Converging behavioral and ERP results indicated that increased processing fluency impaired subsequent recollection. Results from the analysis of ERP priming effects in the study phase indicated that increased perceptual processing fluency of object features, reflected by the N/P 190 priming effect, can hinder encoding activities, reflected by the LPC priming effect, which leads to worse subsequent recollection based recognition memory. These results support the idea that processing fluency can influence subsequent recognition memory and provide a potential neural mechanism underlying this effect. However, further studies are needed to examine whether processing fluency can affect subsequent familiarity.

No MeSH data available.