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Experiences of People with Diabetes by Payer Type: An Analysis of the Roper Diabetes Data Set.

Garfield SS, Xenakis JJ, Bastian A, McBride M - Diabetes Ther (2015)

Bottom Line: Medicaid patients also have different health information seeking preferences than their counterparts, impacted by technology use patterns and education preferences.Significant variation in experience between Medicaid, Medicare, and privately insured patients can inform disease management and patient engagement strategies.Payers, clinicians and public health agencies can leverage these findings to design initiatives more effectively and understand how intergroup variability impacts program uptake and disease outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: GfK Market Access, Wayland, MA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The study details the experiences of Medicare, Medicaid and privately insured patients with diabetes in the United States by focusing on how these distinct populations perceive their disease and manage their treatment.

Methods: A national survey was fielded among a representative sample of 2,307 US adult diagnosed diabetes patients to investigate demographic, lifestyle, treatment, access to information, and socioeconomic status. This was achieved using a combination of telephone-based interviews and internet-based questionnaires administered via KnowledgePanel®, the only large-scale online panel based on a representative random sample of the US population.

Results: Patients with Medicaid-based insurance face significant differences in diagnosis, treatment and intensity of their diabetes as compared to their Medicare and privately insured counterparts. Medicaid patients develop diabetes at an earlier age with an increased level of severity, and face significant socioeconomic concerns. Medicaid patients also have different health information seeking preferences than their counterparts, impacted by technology use patterns and education preferences. All groups report challenges in paying for their diabetes care, though cost-sharing requirements are relatively low.

Conclusions: Significant variation in experience between Medicaid, Medicare, and privately insured patients can inform disease management and patient engagement strategies. Payers, clinicians and public health agencies can leverage these findings to design initiatives more effectively and understand how intergroup variability impacts program uptake and disease outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Reported consumer technology ownership by insurance coverage
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4478175&req=5

Fig1: Reported consumer technology ownership by insurance coverage

Mentions: According to the study findings, Medicaid and Medicare patients have very different access to and use of information sources as compared to patients with private insurance. Medicaid patients have the lowest rate of internet access, either at home or at work, with 58.1% versus Medicare with 66.3% (Fig. 1). This is in contrast to privately insured patients who have near universal internet access (92.2%). As a result, the most commonly used information sources for Medicare and Medicaid patients are printed periodicals and information from friends and family, whereas privately insured patients typically get information from the internet. Medicare and Medicaid patients also had a much lower rate of cell phone ownership with 78.9% and 74.3%, respectively (private: 94.2%). Medicare and Medicaid patients also have much lower ownership of internet ready portable devices such as smartphones and tablets (Medicare: 31.5%/23.6%; Medicaid: 34.0%/9.6%; private: 61.2%/49.0%).Fig. 1


Experiences of People with Diabetes by Payer Type: An Analysis of the Roper Diabetes Data Set.

Garfield SS, Xenakis JJ, Bastian A, McBride M - Diabetes Ther (2015)

Reported consumer technology ownership by insurance coverage
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4478175&req=5

Fig1: Reported consumer technology ownership by insurance coverage
Mentions: According to the study findings, Medicaid and Medicare patients have very different access to and use of information sources as compared to patients with private insurance. Medicaid patients have the lowest rate of internet access, either at home or at work, with 58.1% versus Medicare with 66.3% (Fig. 1). This is in contrast to privately insured patients who have near universal internet access (92.2%). As a result, the most commonly used information sources for Medicare and Medicaid patients are printed periodicals and information from friends and family, whereas privately insured patients typically get information from the internet. Medicare and Medicaid patients also had a much lower rate of cell phone ownership with 78.9% and 74.3%, respectively (private: 94.2%). Medicare and Medicaid patients also have much lower ownership of internet ready portable devices such as smartphones and tablets (Medicare: 31.5%/23.6%; Medicaid: 34.0%/9.6%; private: 61.2%/49.0%).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Medicaid patients also have different health information seeking preferences than their counterparts, impacted by technology use patterns and education preferences.Significant variation in experience between Medicaid, Medicare, and privately insured patients can inform disease management and patient engagement strategies.Payers, clinicians and public health agencies can leverage these findings to design initiatives more effectively and understand how intergroup variability impacts program uptake and disease outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: GfK Market Access, Wayland, MA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The study details the experiences of Medicare, Medicaid and privately insured patients with diabetes in the United States by focusing on how these distinct populations perceive their disease and manage their treatment.

Methods: A national survey was fielded among a representative sample of 2,307 US adult diagnosed diabetes patients to investigate demographic, lifestyle, treatment, access to information, and socioeconomic status. This was achieved using a combination of telephone-based interviews and internet-based questionnaires administered via KnowledgePanel®, the only large-scale online panel based on a representative random sample of the US population.

Results: Patients with Medicaid-based insurance face significant differences in diagnosis, treatment and intensity of their diabetes as compared to their Medicare and privately insured counterparts. Medicaid patients develop diabetes at an earlier age with an increased level of severity, and face significant socioeconomic concerns. Medicaid patients also have different health information seeking preferences than their counterparts, impacted by technology use patterns and education preferences. All groups report challenges in paying for their diabetes care, though cost-sharing requirements are relatively low.

Conclusions: Significant variation in experience between Medicaid, Medicare, and privately insured patients can inform disease management and patient engagement strategies. Payers, clinicians and public health agencies can leverage these findings to design initiatives more effectively and understand how intergroup variability impacts program uptake and disease outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus