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Latitudinal Gradient in Otolith Shape among Local Populations of Atlantic Herring (Clupea harengus L.) in Norway.

Libungan LA, Slotte A, Husebø Å, Godiksen JA, Pálsson S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Otolith shape analysis of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in Norwegian waters shows significant differentiation among fjords and a latitudinal gradient along the coast where neighbouring populations are more similar to each other than to those sampled at larger distances.Our results suggest that the semi-enclosed systems, where the local populations live and breed, are efficient barriers for dispersal.Otolith shape can thus serve as a marker to identify the origin of herring along the coast of Norway.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.

ABSTRACT
Otolith shape analysis of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in Norwegian waters shows significant differentiation among fjords and a latitudinal gradient along the coast where neighbouring populations are more similar to each other than to those sampled at larger distances. The otolith shape was obtained using quantitative shape analysis, the outlines were transformed with Wavelet and analysed with multivariate methods. The observed morphological differences are likely to reflect environmental differences but indicate low dispersal among the local herring populations. Otolith shape variation suggests also limited exchange between the local populations and their oceanic counterparts, which could be due to differences in spawning behaviour. Herring from the most northerly location (69°N) in Balsfjord, which is genetically more similar to Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii), differed in otolith shape from all the other populations. Our results suggest that the semi-enclosed systems, where the local populations live and breed, are efficient barriers for dispersal. Otolith shape can thus serve as a marker to identify the origin of herring along the coast of Norway.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean and standard deviation (sd) of the Wavelet coefficients (grey) representing shape for all combined otoliths and the proportion of variance among herring populations or the intraclass correlation (ICC, black solid line).The horizontal axis shows angle in degrees (°) based on polar coordinates where the centroid of the otolith is the center point of the polar coordinates.
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pone.0130847.g003: Mean and standard deviation (sd) of the Wavelet coefficients (grey) representing shape for all combined otoliths and the proportion of variance among herring populations or the intraclass correlation (ICC, black solid line).The horizontal axis shows angle in degrees (°) based on polar coordinates where the centroid of the otolith is the center point of the polar coordinates.

Mentions: Otolith shape differed among all of the populations in the study, as reflected in the differences in the mean shape (Fig 2) and high level of between population variation in the Wavelet coefficients (ICC) for these regions on the otolith outline at 0–20° and 170–190° (Fig 3).


Latitudinal Gradient in Otolith Shape among Local Populations of Atlantic Herring (Clupea harengus L.) in Norway.

Libungan LA, Slotte A, Husebø Å, Godiksen JA, Pálsson S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Mean and standard deviation (sd) of the Wavelet coefficients (grey) representing shape for all combined otoliths and the proportion of variance among herring populations or the intraclass correlation (ICC, black solid line).The horizontal axis shows angle in degrees (°) based on polar coordinates where the centroid of the otolith is the center point of the polar coordinates.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4478005&req=5

pone.0130847.g003: Mean and standard deviation (sd) of the Wavelet coefficients (grey) representing shape for all combined otoliths and the proportion of variance among herring populations or the intraclass correlation (ICC, black solid line).The horizontal axis shows angle in degrees (°) based on polar coordinates where the centroid of the otolith is the center point of the polar coordinates.
Mentions: Otolith shape differed among all of the populations in the study, as reflected in the differences in the mean shape (Fig 2) and high level of between population variation in the Wavelet coefficients (ICC) for these regions on the otolith outline at 0–20° and 170–190° (Fig 3).

Bottom Line: Otolith shape analysis of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in Norwegian waters shows significant differentiation among fjords and a latitudinal gradient along the coast where neighbouring populations are more similar to each other than to those sampled at larger distances.Our results suggest that the semi-enclosed systems, where the local populations live and breed, are efficient barriers for dispersal.Otolith shape can thus serve as a marker to identify the origin of herring along the coast of Norway.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.

ABSTRACT
Otolith shape analysis of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in Norwegian waters shows significant differentiation among fjords and a latitudinal gradient along the coast where neighbouring populations are more similar to each other than to those sampled at larger distances. The otolith shape was obtained using quantitative shape analysis, the outlines were transformed with Wavelet and analysed with multivariate methods. The observed morphological differences are likely to reflect environmental differences but indicate low dispersal among the local herring populations. Otolith shape variation suggests also limited exchange between the local populations and their oceanic counterparts, which could be due to differences in spawning behaviour. Herring from the most northerly location (69°N) in Balsfjord, which is genetically more similar to Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii), differed in otolith shape from all the other populations. Our results suggest that the semi-enclosed systems, where the local populations live and breed, are efficient barriers for dispersal. Otolith shape can thus serve as a marker to identify the origin of herring along the coast of Norway.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus