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Latent progenitor cells as potential regulators for tympanic membrane regeneration.

Kim SW, Kim J, Seonwoo H, Jang KJ, Kim YJ, Lim HJ, Lim KT, Tian C, Chung JH, Choung YH - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Here, we explored an approach for TM regeneration where the latent progenitor or stem cells within TM epithelial layers may play an important regulatory role.Additionally, they are present at high levels in perforated TMs, especially in proximity to the holes, regardless of acute or chronic status, suggesting that TM stem cells may be a potential factor for TM regeneration.Our study suggests that latent TM stem cells could be potential regulators of regeneration, which provides a new insight into this clinically important process and a potential target for new therapies for chronic otitis media and other eardrum injuries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Burns and Plastic Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Yanbian University, 1327 Juzi Street, Yanji, Jilin 133000, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Tympanic membrane (TM) perforation, in particular chronic otitis media, is one of the most common clinical problems in the world and can present with sensorineural healing loss. Here, we explored an approach for TM regeneration where the latent progenitor or stem cells within TM epithelial layers may play an important regulatory role. We showed that potential TM stem cells present highly positive staining for epithelial stem cell markers in all areas of normal TM tissue. Additionally, they are present at high levels in perforated TMs, especially in proximity to the holes, regardless of acute or chronic status, suggesting that TM stem cells may be a potential factor for TM regeneration. Our study suggests that latent TM stem cells could be potential regulators of regeneration, which provides a new insight into this clinically important process and a potential target for new therapies for chronic otitis media and other eardrum injuries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Expression of INGβ1 and CK 19 in chronic TM perforations.a) TMs with perforations showed high expression of INGβ1 and CK 19 on the first day, (b) 1 week, (c) 3 weeks, (d) 6 weeks, (e) 9 weeks after completing the whole 7-day procedure for chronic perforations. The completely healed TMs showed low expression of INGβ1 and CK 19 at 6 weeks and 9 weeks after the chronic perforation procedure. 1, 5; annulus, 3; malleus handle, 4; pars tensa, 2; perforation site.
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f4: Expression of INGβ1 and CK 19 in chronic TM perforations.a) TMs with perforations showed high expression of INGβ1 and CK 19 on the first day, (b) 1 week, (c) 3 weeks, (d) 6 weeks, (e) 9 weeks after completing the whole 7-day procedure for chronic perforations. The completely healed TMs showed low expression of INGβ1 and CK 19 at 6 weeks and 9 weeks after the chronic perforation procedure. 1, 5; annulus, 3; malleus handle, 4; pars tensa, 2; perforation site.

Mentions: As shown in Fig. 4, on the first day after the 7-day procedure for chronic perforation was complete, INGβ1 and CK19 were strongly expressed in the remnant TM around the malleus handle and the perforation side of the annulus compared to normal TMs. Additionally, these markers were relatively weakly expressed in the pars tensa and non-perforation side of the annulus (Fig. 4a). However, the staining intensities of INGβ1 and CK19 were much higher in all areas including the malleus handle and even the pars tensa and non-perforation side of the annulus on the first, third, sixth, and ninth week compared to normal TMs and TMs on the first day after the chronic perforation procedure. Before these experiments, we expected that the chronically perforated TMs would show minimal regeneration with faint expression of epithelial stem cell markers. However, the expression of INGβ1 and CK19 was high even at 9 weeks after the chronic perforation procedure. Only the expression in the pars tensa and non-perforation side of the annulus appeared to be lower than that in samples from other days. This difference appeared to reflect the healing state of the TM. The TM on the third week (Fig. 4f) showed almost complete healing, in contrast to the other TMs (Fig. 4b,d,e). Most TMs with large perforations showed high regeneration potential even 9 weeks after the chronic perforation procedure.


Latent progenitor cells as potential regulators for tympanic membrane regeneration.

Kim SW, Kim J, Seonwoo H, Jang KJ, Kim YJ, Lim HJ, Lim KT, Tian C, Chung JH, Choung YH - Sci Rep (2015)

Expression of INGβ1 and CK 19 in chronic TM perforations.a) TMs with perforations showed high expression of INGβ1 and CK 19 on the first day, (b) 1 week, (c) 3 weeks, (d) 6 weeks, (e) 9 weeks after completing the whole 7-day procedure for chronic perforations. The completely healed TMs showed low expression of INGβ1 and CK 19 at 6 weeks and 9 weeks after the chronic perforation procedure. 1, 5; annulus, 3; malleus handle, 4; pars tensa, 2; perforation site.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4477343&req=5

f4: Expression of INGβ1 and CK 19 in chronic TM perforations.a) TMs with perforations showed high expression of INGβ1 and CK 19 on the first day, (b) 1 week, (c) 3 weeks, (d) 6 weeks, (e) 9 weeks after completing the whole 7-day procedure for chronic perforations. The completely healed TMs showed low expression of INGβ1 and CK 19 at 6 weeks and 9 weeks after the chronic perforation procedure. 1, 5; annulus, 3; malleus handle, 4; pars tensa, 2; perforation site.
Mentions: As shown in Fig. 4, on the first day after the 7-day procedure for chronic perforation was complete, INGβ1 and CK19 were strongly expressed in the remnant TM around the malleus handle and the perforation side of the annulus compared to normal TMs. Additionally, these markers were relatively weakly expressed in the pars tensa and non-perforation side of the annulus (Fig. 4a). However, the staining intensities of INGβ1 and CK19 were much higher in all areas including the malleus handle and even the pars tensa and non-perforation side of the annulus on the first, third, sixth, and ninth week compared to normal TMs and TMs on the first day after the chronic perforation procedure. Before these experiments, we expected that the chronically perforated TMs would show minimal regeneration with faint expression of epithelial stem cell markers. However, the expression of INGβ1 and CK19 was high even at 9 weeks after the chronic perforation procedure. Only the expression in the pars tensa and non-perforation side of the annulus appeared to be lower than that in samples from other days. This difference appeared to reflect the healing state of the TM. The TM on the third week (Fig. 4f) showed almost complete healing, in contrast to the other TMs (Fig. 4b,d,e). Most TMs with large perforations showed high regeneration potential even 9 weeks after the chronic perforation procedure.

Bottom Line: Here, we explored an approach for TM regeneration where the latent progenitor or stem cells within TM epithelial layers may play an important regulatory role.Additionally, they are present at high levels in perforated TMs, especially in proximity to the holes, regardless of acute or chronic status, suggesting that TM stem cells may be a potential factor for TM regeneration.Our study suggests that latent TM stem cells could be potential regulators of regeneration, which provides a new insight into this clinically important process and a potential target for new therapies for chronic otitis media and other eardrum injuries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Burns and Plastic Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Yanbian University, 1327 Juzi Street, Yanji, Jilin 133000, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Tympanic membrane (TM) perforation, in particular chronic otitis media, is one of the most common clinical problems in the world and can present with sensorineural healing loss. Here, we explored an approach for TM regeneration where the latent progenitor or stem cells within TM epithelial layers may play an important regulatory role. We showed that potential TM stem cells present highly positive staining for epithelial stem cell markers in all areas of normal TM tissue. Additionally, they are present at high levels in perforated TMs, especially in proximity to the holes, regardless of acute or chronic status, suggesting that TM stem cells may be a potential factor for TM regeneration. Our study suggests that latent TM stem cells could be potential regulators of regeneration, which provides a new insight into this clinically important process and a potential target for new therapies for chronic otitis media and other eardrum injuries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus