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Three-dimensional printing models improve understanding of spinal fracture--A randomized controlled study in China.

Li Z, Li Z, Xu R, Li M, Li J, Liu Y, Sui D, Zhang W, Chen Z - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Students in the 3 Dp or 3D group performed significantly better than those in the CT group, although males in the 3D group scored higher than females.Students in the 3 Dp group were the first to answer all questions, and there were no sex-related differences.Pleasure, assistance, effect, and confidence were more predominant in students in the 3 Dp group than in those in the 3D and CT groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, The Affiliated Hospital, Binzhou Medical University, Binzhou, Shandong, China.

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional printing (3 Dp) is being increasingly used in medical education. Although the use of such lifelike models is beneficial, well-powered, randomized studies supporting this statement are scarce. Two spinal fracture simulation models were generated by 3 Dp. Altogether, 120 medical students (54.2% females) were randomized into three teaching module groups [two-dimensional computed tomography images (CT), 3D, or 3 Dp] and asked to answer 10 key anatomical and 4 evaluative questions. Students in the 3 Dp or 3D group performed significantly better than those in the CT group, although males in the 3D group scored higher than females. Students in the 3 Dp group were the first to answer all questions, and there were no sex-related differences. Pleasure, assistance, effect, and confidence were more predominant in students in the 3 Dp group than in those in the 3D and CT groups. This randomized study revealed that the 3 Dp model markedly improved the identification of complex spinal fracture anatomy by medical students and was equally appreciated and comprehended by both sexes. Therefore, the lifelike fracture model made by 3 Dp technology should be used as a means of premedical education.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overall time (s) required for answering the 10 questions.Students in the three-dimensional printing (3Dp) group were the first to answer all the questions (Tukey’s test), and there were no sex-related differences. However, more time was spent by females in the CT group. *p < 0.05.
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f6: Overall time (s) required for answering the 10 questions.Students in the three-dimensional printing (3Dp) group were the first to answer all the questions (Tukey’s test), and there were no sex-related differences. However, more time was spent by females in the CT group. *p < 0.05.

Mentions: Analysis of the time required for answering the 10 questions revealed a significant difference between imaging modalities: students in the CT group required 708.56 ± 212.08 s vs. 896.59 ± 266.08 s (mean ± SD s of male vs. female) for completing the 10 questions, whereas those in the 3D and 3Dp groups required 514.22 ± 177.69 s vs. 593.48 ± 207.36 s and 373.56 ± 206.97 s vs. 376.72 ± 138.95 s, respectively (Table 3). Post hoc analysis revealed that students in the 3Dp group were the first to answer all the questions (3Dp vs. CT: MD = −436.7, p < 0.0001; 3Dp vs. 3D: MD = −177.1, p = 0.0006; Tukey’s test), and there were no differences between males and females (female vs. male: MD = 3.172, p > 0.9999, Sidak’s test, Fig. 6).


Three-dimensional printing models improve understanding of spinal fracture--A randomized controlled study in China.

Li Z, Li Z, Xu R, Li M, Li J, Liu Y, Sui D, Zhang W, Chen Z - Sci Rep (2015)

Overall time (s) required for answering the 10 questions.Students in the three-dimensional printing (3Dp) group were the first to answer all the questions (Tukey’s test), and there were no sex-related differences. However, more time was spent by females in the CT group. *p < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4477328&req=5

f6: Overall time (s) required for answering the 10 questions.Students in the three-dimensional printing (3Dp) group were the first to answer all the questions (Tukey’s test), and there were no sex-related differences. However, more time was spent by females in the CT group. *p < 0.05.
Mentions: Analysis of the time required for answering the 10 questions revealed a significant difference between imaging modalities: students in the CT group required 708.56 ± 212.08 s vs. 896.59 ± 266.08 s (mean ± SD s of male vs. female) for completing the 10 questions, whereas those in the 3D and 3Dp groups required 514.22 ± 177.69 s vs. 593.48 ± 207.36 s and 373.56 ± 206.97 s vs. 376.72 ± 138.95 s, respectively (Table 3). Post hoc analysis revealed that students in the 3Dp group were the first to answer all the questions (3Dp vs. CT: MD = −436.7, p < 0.0001; 3Dp vs. 3D: MD = −177.1, p = 0.0006; Tukey’s test), and there were no differences between males and females (female vs. male: MD = 3.172, p > 0.9999, Sidak’s test, Fig. 6).

Bottom Line: Students in the 3 Dp or 3D group performed significantly better than those in the CT group, although males in the 3D group scored higher than females.Students in the 3 Dp group were the first to answer all questions, and there were no sex-related differences.Pleasure, assistance, effect, and confidence were more predominant in students in the 3 Dp group than in those in the 3D and CT groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, The Affiliated Hospital, Binzhou Medical University, Binzhou, Shandong, China.

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional printing (3 Dp) is being increasingly used in medical education. Although the use of such lifelike models is beneficial, well-powered, randomized studies supporting this statement are scarce. Two spinal fracture simulation models were generated by 3 Dp. Altogether, 120 medical students (54.2% females) were randomized into three teaching module groups [two-dimensional computed tomography images (CT), 3D, or 3 Dp] and asked to answer 10 key anatomical and 4 evaluative questions. Students in the 3 Dp or 3D group performed significantly better than those in the CT group, although males in the 3D group scored higher than females. Students in the 3 Dp group were the first to answer all questions, and there were no sex-related differences. Pleasure, assistance, effect, and confidence were more predominant in students in the 3 Dp group than in those in the 3D and CT groups. This randomized study revealed that the 3 Dp model markedly improved the identification of complex spinal fracture anatomy by medical students and was equally appreciated and comprehended by both sexes. Therefore, the lifelike fracture model made by 3 Dp technology should be used as a means of premedical education.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus