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Three-dimensional printing models improve understanding of spinal fracture--A randomized controlled study in China.

Li Z, Li Z, Xu R, Li M, Li J, Liu Y, Sui D, Zhang W, Chen Z - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Students in the 3 Dp or 3D group performed significantly better than those in the CT group, although males in the 3D group scored higher than females.Students in the 3 Dp group were the first to answer all questions, and there were no sex-related differences.Pleasure, assistance, effect, and confidence were more predominant in students in the 3 Dp group than in those in the 3D and CT groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, The Affiliated Hospital, Binzhou Medical University, Binzhou, Shandong, China.

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional printing (3 Dp) is being increasingly used in medical education. Although the use of such lifelike models is beneficial, well-powered, randomized studies supporting this statement are scarce. Two spinal fracture simulation models were generated by 3 Dp. Altogether, 120 medical students (54.2% females) were randomized into three teaching module groups [two-dimensional computed tomography images (CT), 3D, or 3 Dp] and asked to answer 10 key anatomical and 4 evaluative questions. Students in the 3 Dp or 3D group performed significantly better than those in the CT group, although males in the 3D group scored higher than females. Students in the 3 Dp group were the first to answer all questions, and there were no sex-related differences. Pleasure, assistance, effect, and confidence were more predominant in students in the 3 Dp group than in those in the 3D and CT groups. This randomized study revealed that the 3 Dp model markedly improved the identification of complex spinal fracture anatomy by medical students and was equally appreciated and comprehended by both sexes. Therefore, the lifelike fracture model made by 3 Dp technology should be used as a means of premedical education.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sum score of correct answers.Students in the three-dimensional printing (3Dp) or 3D groups performed significantly better than those in the computed tomography (CT) group; males in the 3D group scored higher than females, in contrast to those in the 3Dp (post hoc by Sidak’s test) groups. FTM: F value of the three teaching modules; Fsex: F value of sex; **p < 0.01.
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f5: Sum score of correct answers.Students in the three-dimensional printing (3Dp) or 3D groups performed significantly better than those in the computed tomography (CT) group; males in the 3D group scored higher than females, in contrast to those in the 3Dp (post hoc by Sidak’s test) groups. FTM: F value of the three teaching modules; Fsex: F value of sex; **p < 0.01.

Mentions: We completed the randomized controlled study in three months. Overall, the results of the sum scores of correct answers (Table 3) were significantly different between the three groups affected by the TM and sex [F value of the three TMs (FTM) = 50.65, p < 0.0001 and that of sex (Fsex) = 4.789 p = 0.0307; two-way ANOVA]. Further, post hoc analysis revealed that students in the 3Dp and 3D groups performed better than those in the CT group based on Tukey’s multiple comparison test (3D vs. CT: mean difference (MD) = 2.325, p < 0.0001 and 3Dp vs. CT: MD = 3.075, p < 0.0001), while no significant differences were found between 3D and 3Dp groups (3D vs. CT: MD = 0.7500, p = 0.0508). Males in the 3D group scored higher than females (male vs. female: MD = 0.7500, p = 0.0508) by Sidak’s multiple comparison test; however, this phenomenon did not occur in the CT and 3Dp groups (Fig. 5).


Three-dimensional printing models improve understanding of spinal fracture--A randomized controlled study in China.

Li Z, Li Z, Xu R, Li M, Li J, Liu Y, Sui D, Zhang W, Chen Z - Sci Rep (2015)

Sum score of correct answers.Students in the three-dimensional printing (3Dp) or 3D groups performed significantly better than those in the computed tomography (CT) group; males in the 3D group scored higher than females, in contrast to those in the 3Dp (post hoc by Sidak’s test) groups. FTM: F value of the three teaching modules; Fsex: F value of sex; **p < 0.01.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4477328&req=5

f5: Sum score of correct answers.Students in the three-dimensional printing (3Dp) or 3D groups performed significantly better than those in the computed tomography (CT) group; males in the 3D group scored higher than females, in contrast to those in the 3Dp (post hoc by Sidak’s test) groups. FTM: F value of the three teaching modules; Fsex: F value of sex; **p < 0.01.
Mentions: We completed the randomized controlled study in three months. Overall, the results of the sum scores of correct answers (Table 3) were significantly different between the three groups affected by the TM and sex [F value of the three TMs (FTM) = 50.65, p < 0.0001 and that of sex (Fsex) = 4.789 p = 0.0307; two-way ANOVA]. Further, post hoc analysis revealed that students in the 3Dp and 3D groups performed better than those in the CT group based on Tukey’s multiple comparison test (3D vs. CT: mean difference (MD) = 2.325, p < 0.0001 and 3Dp vs. CT: MD = 3.075, p < 0.0001), while no significant differences were found between 3D and 3Dp groups (3D vs. CT: MD = 0.7500, p = 0.0508). Males in the 3D group scored higher than females (male vs. female: MD = 0.7500, p = 0.0508) by Sidak’s multiple comparison test; however, this phenomenon did not occur in the CT and 3Dp groups (Fig. 5).

Bottom Line: Students in the 3 Dp or 3D group performed significantly better than those in the CT group, although males in the 3D group scored higher than females.Students in the 3 Dp group were the first to answer all questions, and there were no sex-related differences.Pleasure, assistance, effect, and confidence were more predominant in students in the 3 Dp group than in those in the 3D and CT groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, The Affiliated Hospital, Binzhou Medical University, Binzhou, Shandong, China.

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional printing (3 Dp) is being increasingly used in medical education. Although the use of such lifelike models is beneficial, well-powered, randomized studies supporting this statement are scarce. Two spinal fracture simulation models were generated by 3 Dp. Altogether, 120 medical students (54.2% females) were randomized into three teaching module groups [two-dimensional computed tomography images (CT), 3D, or 3 Dp] and asked to answer 10 key anatomical and 4 evaluative questions. Students in the 3 Dp or 3D group performed significantly better than those in the CT group, although males in the 3D group scored higher than females. Students in the 3 Dp group were the first to answer all questions, and there were no sex-related differences. Pleasure, assistance, effect, and confidence were more predominant in students in the 3 Dp group than in those in the 3D and CT groups. This randomized study revealed that the 3 Dp model markedly improved the identification of complex spinal fracture anatomy by medical students and was equally appreciated and comprehended by both sexes. Therefore, the lifelike fracture model made by 3 Dp technology should be used as a means of premedical education.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus