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Three-dimensional printing models improve understanding of spinal fracture--A randomized controlled study in China.

Li Z, Li Z, Xu R, Li M, Li J, Liu Y, Sui D, Zhang W, Chen Z - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Students in the 3 Dp or 3D group performed significantly better than those in the CT group, although males in the 3D group scored higher than females.Students in the 3 Dp group were the first to answer all questions, and there were no sex-related differences.Pleasure, assistance, effect, and confidence were more predominant in students in the 3 Dp group than in those in the 3D and CT groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, The Affiliated Hospital, Binzhou Medical University, Binzhou, Shandong, China.

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional printing (3 Dp) is being increasingly used in medical education. Although the use of such lifelike models is beneficial, well-powered, randomized studies supporting this statement are scarce. Two spinal fracture simulation models were generated by 3 Dp. Altogether, 120 medical students (54.2% females) were randomized into three teaching module groups [two-dimensional computed tomography images (CT), 3D, or 3 Dp] and asked to answer 10 key anatomical and 4 evaluative questions. Students in the 3 Dp or 3D group performed significantly better than those in the CT group, although males in the 3D group scored higher than females. Students in the 3 Dp group were the first to answer all questions, and there were no sex-related differences. Pleasure, assistance, effect, and confidence were more predominant in students in the 3 Dp group than in those in the 3D and CT groups. This randomized study revealed that the 3 Dp model markedly improved the identification of complex spinal fracture anatomy by medical students and was equally appreciated and comprehended by both sexes. Therefore, the lifelike fracture model made by 3 Dp technology should be used as a means of premedical education.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Screenshot of the teaching module for two-dimensional computed tomography images.The ninth thoracic vertebra (T9):a, b, and c (axial, sagittal, coronal views, respectively); the second cervical vertebra (C2): d, e, and f (axial, sagittal, coronal views, respectively).
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f2: Screenshot of the teaching module for two-dimensional computed tomography images.The ninth thoracic vertebra (T9):a, b, and c (axial, sagittal, coronal views, respectively); the second cervical vertebra (C2): d, e, and f (axial, sagittal, coronal views, respectively).

Mentions: Students were randomized into three groups using a computer program. The TM of the first group (CT group) was based on the CT images of the two patients in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes (Fig. 2). The TM of the second group (3D group) was based on the 3D images reconstructed from the DICOM file, original data file from the two patients, each angle freely adjustable in the computer (Fig. 3 and S1,2 Video). In the last group (3Dp group), each student received the two fracture models (Fig. 4 and S3,4 Video). A teacher provided a detailed interpretation of the fracture in each group.


Three-dimensional printing models improve understanding of spinal fracture--A randomized controlled study in China.

Li Z, Li Z, Xu R, Li M, Li J, Liu Y, Sui D, Zhang W, Chen Z - Sci Rep (2015)

Screenshot of the teaching module for two-dimensional computed tomography images.The ninth thoracic vertebra (T9):a, b, and c (axial, sagittal, coronal views, respectively); the second cervical vertebra (C2): d, e, and f (axial, sagittal, coronal views, respectively).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4477328&req=5

f2: Screenshot of the teaching module for two-dimensional computed tomography images.The ninth thoracic vertebra (T9):a, b, and c (axial, sagittal, coronal views, respectively); the second cervical vertebra (C2): d, e, and f (axial, sagittal, coronal views, respectively).
Mentions: Students were randomized into three groups using a computer program. The TM of the first group (CT group) was based on the CT images of the two patients in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes (Fig. 2). The TM of the second group (3D group) was based on the 3D images reconstructed from the DICOM file, original data file from the two patients, each angle freely adjustable in the computer (Fig. 3 and S1,2 Video). In the last group (3Dp group), each student received the two fracture models (Fig. 4 and S3,4 Video). A teacher provided a detailed interpretation of the fracture in each group.

Bottom Line: Students in the 3 Dp or 3D group performed significantly better than those in the CT group, although males in the 3D group scored higher than females.Students in the 3 Dp group were the first to answer all questions, and there were no sex-related differences.Pleasure, assistance, effect, and confidence were more predominant in students in the 3 Dp group than in those in the 3D and CT groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, The Affiliated Hospital, Binzhou Medical University, Binzhou, Shandong, China.

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional printing (3 Dp) is being increasingly used in medical education. Although the use of such lifelike models is beneficial, well-powered, randomized studies supporting this statement are scarce. Two spinal fracture simulation models were generated by 3 Dp. Altogether, 120 medical students (54.2% females) were randomized into three teaching module groups [two-dimensional computed tomography images (CT), 3D, or 3 Dp] and asked to answer 10 key anatomical and 4 evaluative questions. Students in the 3 Dp or 3D group performed significantly better than those in the CT group, although males in the 3D group scored higher than females. Students in the 3 Dp group were the first to answer all questions, and there were no sex-related differences. Pleasure, assistance, effect, and confidence were more predominant in students in the 3 Dp group than in those in the 3D and CT groups. This randomized study revealed that the 3 Dp model markedly improved the identification of complex spinal fracture anatomy by medical students and was equally appreciated and comprehended by both sexes. Therefore, the lifelike fracture model made by 3 Dp technology should be used as a means of premedical education.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus