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Evidence for horizontal transfer of mitochondrial DNA to the plastid genome in a bamboo genus.

Ma PF, Zhang YX, Guo ZH, Li DZ - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Here we sequenced 6 plastid genomes of bamboos, three of which are neotropical woody species and three are herbaceous ones.Our study provided evidence of the mitochondrial-to-plastid DNA transfer in the monocots, demonstrating again that this rare event does occur in other angiosperm lineages.However, the mechanism underlying the transfer remains obscure, and more studies in other plants may elucidate it in the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Key Laboratory for Plant Diversity and Biogeography of East Asia, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650201, China [2] Plant Germplasm and Genomics Center, Germplasm Bank of Wild Species, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650201, China.

ABSTRACT
In flowering plants, three genomes (nuclear, mitochondrial, and plastid) coexist and intracellular horizontal transfer of DNA is prevalent, especially from the plastid to the mitochondrion genome. However, the plastid genomes are generally conserved in evolution and have long been considered immune to foreign DNA. Recently, the opposite direction of DNA transfer from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome has been reported in two eudicot lineages. Here we sequenced 6 plastid genomes of bamboos, three of which are neotropical woody species and three are herbaceous ones. Several unusual features were found, including the duplication of trnT-GGU and loss of one copy of rps19 due to contraction of inverted repeats (IRs). The most intriguing was the ~2.7 kb insertion in the plastid IR regions in the three herbaceous bamboos. Furthermore, the insertion was documented to be horizontally transferred from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome. Our study provided evidence of the mitochondrial-to-plastid DNA transfer in the monocots, demonstrating again that this rare event does occur in other angiosperm lineages. However, the mechanism underlying the transfer remains obscure, and more studies in other plants may elucidate it in the future.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Maximum likelihood phylogeny of the Bambusoideae based on partitioned analysis of the complete plastid genome sequences.The numbers associated with the nodes are bootstrap support values. The hash mark indicates the mitochondrion-to-plastid DNA transfer in the common ancestor of Pariana.
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f3: Maximum likelihood phylogeny of the Bambusoideae based on partitioned analysis of the complete plastid genome sequences.The numbers associated with the nodes are bootstrap support values. The hash mark indicates the mitochondrion-to-plastid DNA transfer in the common ancestor of Pariana.

Mentions: To place the mitochondrion-to-plastid DNA transfer in an evolutionary context, we built a phylogenetic tree for the representative species from the three bamboo tribes. Maximum likelihood analyses of the complete plastid genome sequences as a whole and partitioned by the LSC, SSC and IR regions yielded the same topology with nearly identical bootstrap values (Fig. 3 and Supplemental Fig. 3). Each of the three tribes were monophyletic and Olyreae was sister to Bambuseae, supported by 100% bootstrap value (Fig. 3), as in previous studies2223. This intracellular DNA transfer was restricted to Pariana and its sister genus Eremitis, indicating that it likely occurred in their common ancestor.


Evidence for horizontal transfer of mitochondrial DNA to the plastid genome in a bamboo genus.

Ma PF, Zhang YX, Guo ZH, Li DZ - Sci Rep (2015)

Maximum likelihood phylogeny of the Bambusoideae based on partitioned analysis of the complete plastid genome sequences.The numbers associated with the nodes are bootstrap support values. The hash mark indicates the mitochondrion-to-plastid DNA transfer in the common ancestor of Pariana.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4477325&req=5

f3: Maximum likelihood phylogeny of the Bambusoideae based on partitioned analysis of the complete plastid genome sequences.The numbers associated with the nodes are bootstrap support values. The hash mark indicates the mitochondrion-to-plastid DNA transfer in the common ancestor of Pariana.
Mentions: To place the mitochondrion-to-plastid DNA transfer in an evolutionary context, we built a phylogenetic tree for the representative species from the three bamboo tribes. Maximum likelihood analyses of the complete plastid genome sequences as a whole and partitioned by the LSC, SSC and IR regions yielded the same topology with nearly identical bootstrap values (Fig. 3 and Supplemental Fig. 3). Each of the three tribes were monophyletic and Olyreae was sister to Bambuseae, supported by 100% bootstrap value (Fig. 3), as in previous studies2223. This intracellular DNA transfer was restricted to Pariana and its sister genus Eremitis, indicating that it likely occurred in their common ancestor.

Bottom Line: Here we sequenced 6 plastid genomes of bamboos, three of which are neotropical woody species and three are herbaceous ones.Our study provided evidence of the mitochondrial-to-plastid DNA transfer in the monocots, demonstrating again that this rare event does occur in other angiosperm lineages.However, the mechanism underlying the transfer remains obscure, and more studies in other plants may elucidate it in the future.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Key Laboratory for Plant Diversity and Biogeography of East Asia, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650201, China [2] Plant Germplasm and Genomics Center, Germplasm Bank of Wild Species, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650201, China.

ABSTRACT
In flowering plants, three genomes (nuclear, mitochondrial, and plastid) coexist and intracellular horizontal transfer of DNA is prevalent, especially from the plastid to the mitochondrion genome. However, the plastid genomes are generally conserved in evolution and have long been considered immune to foreign DNA. Recently, the opposite direction of DNA transfer from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome has been reported in two eudicot lineages. Here we sequenced 6 plastid genomes of bamboos, three of which are neotropical woody species and three are herbaceous ones. Several unusual features were found, including the duplication of trnT-GGU and loss of one copy of rps19 due to contraction of inverted repeats (IRs). The most intriguing was the ~2.7 kb insertion in the plastid IR regions in the three herbaceous bamboos. Furthermore, the insertion was documented to be horizontally transferred from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome. Our study provided evidence of the mitochondrial-to-plastid DNA transfer in the monocots, demonstrating again that this rare event does occur in other angiosperm lineages. However, the mechanism underlying the transfer remains obscure, and more studies in other plants may elucidate it in the future.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus