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Student perceptions of gamified audience response system interactions in large group lectures and via lecture capture technology.

Pettit RK, McCoy L, Kinney M, Schwartz FN - BMC Med Educ (2015)

Bottom Line: A significant majority of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the games were engaging, and an effective learning tool.Students clearly valued the engagement and learning aspects of gamified TP interactions.The methods described in this study may be useful for other educators wishing to expand the utility of ARS in their classrooms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona, 5850 E. Still Circle, Mesa, AZ, 85206, USA. rpettit@atsu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Higher education students have positive attitudes about the use of audience response systems (ARS), but even technology-enhanced lessons can become tiresome if the pedagogical approach is exactly the same with each implementation. Gamification is the notion that gaming mechanics can be applied to routine activities. In this study, TurningPoint (TP) ARS interactions were gamified and implemented in 22 large group medical microbiology lectures throughout an integrated year 1 osteopathic medical school curriculum.

Methods: A 32-item questionnaire was used to measure students' perceptions of the gamified TP interactions at the end of their first year. The survey instrument generated both Likert scale and open-ended response data that addressed game design and variety, engagement and learning features, use of TP questions after class, and any value of lecture capture technology for reviewing these interactive presentations. The Chi Square Test was used to analyze grouped responses to Likert scale questions. Responses to open-ended prompts were categorized using open-coding.

Results: Ninety-one students out of 106 (86 %) responded to the survey. A significant majority of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the games were engaging, and an effective learning tool. The questionnaire investigated the degree to which specific features of these interactions were engaging (nine items) and promoted learning (seven items). The most highly ranked engagement aspects were peer competition and focus on the activity (tied for highest ranking), and the most highly ranked learning aspect was applying theoretical knowledge to clinical scenarios. Another notable item was the variety of interactions, which ranked in the top three in both the engagement and learning categories. Open-ended comments shed light on how students use TP questions for exam preparation, and revealed engaging and non-engaging attributes of these interactive sessions for students who review them via lecture capture.

Conclusions: Students clearly valued the engagement and learning aspects of gamified TP interactions. The overwhelming majority of students surveyed in this study were engaged by the variety of TP games, and gained an interest in microbiology. The methods described in this study may be useful for other educators wishing to expand the utility of ARS in their classrooms.

No MeSH data available.


Summary of student responses to the prompt Engagement/Flow: Please rate the extent to which you agree with the following statements. During TP games…
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Fig3: Summary of student responses to the prompt Engagement/Flow: Please rate the extent to which you agree with the following statements. During TP games…

Mentions: One set of questions probed the engagement value of the various game elements and mechanics. In response to the prompt Engagement/Flow: Please rate the extent to which you agree with the following statements. During TP games…at least 85 % of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they enjoyed the friendly peer competition, were focused on the activity, their energy level rose, and they enjoyed the variety of interactions (this prompt included the game examples Individual, Team, Wagering, Mystery Bug) (Fig. 3). In response to specific prompts about the clickers, 79 % of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that using clickers in class kept them on their toes, 77 % agreed or strongly agreed that using clickers put them in game mode, and 69 % agreed or strongly agreed that they enjoyed holding game devices such as clickers. Sixty-eight percent of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that during TP games they got an emotional lift. Only 55 % of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they were focused on the prize during TP games, the lowest positive response in the engagement category. Rewards were nominal, typically candy in the shape of the microbe(s) covered during that class session. However, for some team competitions, a book or flashcard set was raffled off amongst the winning team.Fig. 3


Student perceptions of gamified audience response system interactions in large group lectures and via lecture capture technology.

Pettit RK, McCoy L, Kinney M, Schwartz FN - BMC Med Educ (2015)

Summary of student responses to the prompt Engagement/Flow: Please rate the extent to which you agree with the following statements. During TP games…
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4477320&req=5

Fig3: Summary of student responses to the prompt Engagement/Flow: Please rate the extent to which you agree with the following statements. During TP games…
Mentions: One set of questions probed the engagement value of the various game elements and mechanics. In response to the prompt Engagement/Flow: Please rate the extent to which you agree with the following statements. During TP games…at least 85 % of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they enjoyed the friendly peer competition, were focused on the activity, their energy level rose, and they enjoyed the variety of interactions (this prompt included the game examples Individual, Team, Wagering, Mystery Bug) (Fig. 3). In response to specific prompts about the clickers, 79 % of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that using clickers in class kept them on their toes, 77 % agreed or strongly agreed that using clickers put them in game mode, and 69 % agreed or strongly agreed that they enjoyed holding game devices such as clickers. Sixty-eight percent of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that during TP games they got an emotional lift. Only 55 % of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they were focused on the prize during TP games, the lowest positive response in the engagement category. Rewards were nominal, typically candy in the shape of the microbe(s) covered during that class session. However, for some team competitions, a book or flashcard set was raffled off amongst the winning team.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: A significant majority of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the games were engaging, and an effective learning tool.Students clearly valued the engagement and learning aspects of gamified TP interactions.The methods described in this study may be useful for other educators wishing to expand the utility of ARS in their classrooms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: A. T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona, 5850 E. Still Circle, Mesa, AZ, 85206, USA. rpettit@atsu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Higher education students have positive attitudes about the use of audience response systems (ARS), but even technology-enhanced lessons can become tiresome if the pedagogical approach is exactly the same with each implementation. Gamification is the notion that gaming mechanics can be applied to routine activities. In this study, TurningPoint (TP) ARS interactions were gamified and implemented in 22 large group medical microbiology lectures throughout an integrated year 1 osteopathic medical school curriculum.

Methods: A 32-item questionnaire was used to measure students' perceptions of the gamified TP interactions at the end of their first year. The survey instrument generated both Likert scale and open-ended response data that addressed game design and variety, engagement and learning features, use of TP questions after class, and any value of lecture capture technology for reviewing these interactive presentations. The Chi Square Test was used to analyze grouped responses to Likert scale questions. Responses to open-ended prompts were categorized using open-coding.

Results: Ninety-one students out of 106 (86 %) responded to the survey. A significant majority of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the games were engaging, and an effective learning tool. The questionnaire investigated the degree to which specific features of these interactions were engaging (nine items) and promoted learning (seven items). The most highly ranked engagement aspects were peer competition and focus on the activity (tied for highest ranking), and the most highly ranked learning aspect was applying theoretical knowledge to clinical scenarios. Another notable item was the variety of interactions, which ranked in the top three in both the engagement and learning categories. Open-ended comments shed light on how students use TP questions for exam preparation, and revealed engaging and non-engaging attributes of these interactive sessions for students who review them via lecture capture.

Conclusions: Students clearly valued the engagement and learning aspects of gamified TP interactions. The overwhelming majority of students surveyed in this study were engaged by the variety of TP games, and gained an interest in microbiology. The methods described in this study may be useful for other educators wishing to expand the utility of ARS in their classrooms.

No MeSH data available.