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An fMRI Study of Local Synchronization in Different Subfrequency Bands during the Continuous Feedback of Finger Force.

Zhang H, Gao ZZ, Zang YF - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Conventional functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies on motor feedback employ periodical blocked paradigm which does not allow frequency analysis of brain activity.Our results revealed that the five subfrequency bands of brain activity contributed to the changes of ReHo between real and sham feedback differently, and, more importantly, the changes in basal ganglia were only manifested in Slow-6, implicating the fact that ReHo in ultraslow band may be associated with the functional significance of BG, that is, motor control.These findings provide novel insights into the neural substrate underlying motor feedback, and properties of the ultraslow band of local synchronization deserve more attention in future explorations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055, China ; Center for Cognition and Brain Disorders and the Affiliated Hospital, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310015, China ; Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Research in Assessment of Cognitive Impairments, Hangzhou 310015, China.

ABSTRACT
Conventional functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies on motor feedback employ periodical blocked paradigm which does not allow frequency analysis of brain activity. Here, we carried out an fMRI study by using a continuous paradigm, that is, continuous (8 min) feedback of finger force. Borrowing an analytic method widely used in resting-state fMRI studies, that is, regional homogeneity (ReHo), we compared the local synchronization in some subfrequency bands between real and sham feedback, and the subbands were defined as Slow-6 (0.0-0.01 Hz), Slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz), Slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz), Slow-3 (0.073-0.198 Hz), and Slow-2 (0.198-0.25 Hz). Our results revealed that the five subfrequency bands of brain activity contributed to the changes of ReHo between real and sham feedback differently, and, more importantly, the changes in basal ganglia were only manifested in Slow-6, implicating the fact that ReHo in ultraslow band may be associated with the functional significance of BG, that is, motor control. These findings provide novel insights into the neural substrate underlying motor feedback, and properties of the ultraslow band of local synchronization deserve more attention in future explorations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Clusters showing significant interaction effect between factors of the feedback condition and the frequency band and the relevant comparison results of ReHo in different frequency bands between real and sham feedback conditions. (a) Coronal, sagittal, and axial views of the spatial maps for the interaction effect between the feedback condition and the frequency band; (b) changes in ReHo of the left BG across the frequency bands during real and sham feedback; (c) changes in ReHo of the right BG across the frequency bands during real and sham feedback; (d) changes in ReHo of the PCC across the frequency bands during real and sham feedback. Red represents real feedback and blue represents sham feedback. ∗ indicates the significant difference of ReHo between real and sham feedback. The statistical threshold was set at P < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons.
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fig2: Clusters showing significant interaction effect between factors of the feedback condition and the frequency band and the relevant comparison results of ReHo in different frequency bands between real and sham feedback conditions. (a) Coronal, sagittal, and axial views of the spatial maps for the interaction effect between the feedback condition and the frequency band; (b) changes in ReHo of the left BG across the frequency bands during real and sham feedback; (c) changes in ReHo of the right BG across the frequency bands during real and sham feedback; (d) changes in ReHo of the PCC across the frequency bands during real and sham feedback. Red represents real feedback and blue represents sham feedback. ∗ indicates the significant difference of ReHo between real and sham feedback. The statistical threshold was set at P < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons.

Mentions: The interaction effect between factors of the feedback condition and the frequency band was observed in three clusters, that is, the bilateral PCC and both of the left and right basal ganglia (BG) (mainly containing putamen and caudate) (Figure 2(a) and Table 2). For the PCC, real feedback exhibited greater ReHo in the Slow-5 (t(37) = 3.71, P < 0.005) and Slow-4 (t(37) = 3.75, P < 0.005) than sham feedback (Figure 2(d)). As Figures 2(b) and 2(c) show, real feedback recruited greater ReHo in the left and right BG than sham feedback and these significant differences were only manifested in Slow-6 (t(37) = 4.38, P < 0.005 for the left BG and t(37) = 4.29, P < 0.005 for the right BG).


An fMRI Study of Local Synchronization in Different Subfrequency Bands during the Continuous Feedback of Finger Force.

Zhang H, Gao ZZ, Zang YF - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Clusters showing significant interaction effect between factors of the feedback condition and the frequency band and the relevant comparison results of ReHo in different frequency bands between real and sham feedback conditions. (a) Coronal, sagittal, and axial views of the spatial maps for the interaction effect between the feedback condition and the frequency band; (b) changes in ReHo of the left BG across the frequency bands during real and sham feedback; (c) changes in ReHo of the right BG across the frequency bands during real and sham feedback; (d) changes in ReHo of the PCC across the frequency bands during real and sham feedback. Red represents real feedback and blue represents sham feedback. ∗ indicates the significant difference of ReHo between real and sham feedback. The statistical threshold was set at P < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4477192&req=5

fig2: Clusters showing significant interaction effect between factors of the feedback condition and the frequency band and the relevant comparison results of ReHo in different frequency bands between real and sham feedback conditions. (a) Coronal, sagittal, and axial views of the spatial maps for the interaction effect between the feedback condition and the frequency band; (b) changes in ReHo of the left BG across the frequency bands during real and sham feedback; (c) changes in ReHo of the right BG across the frequency bands during real and sham feedback; (d) changes in ReHo of the PCC across the frequency bands during real and sham feedback. Red represents real feedback and blue represents sham feedback. ∗ indicates the significant difference of ReHo between real and sham feedback. The statistical threshold was set at P < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons.
Mentions: The interaction effect between factors of the feedback condition and the frequency band was observed in three clusters, that is, the bilateral PCC and both of the left and right basal ganglia (BG) (mainly containing putamen and caudate) (Figure 2(a) and Table 2). For the PCC, real feedback exhibited greater ReHo in the Slow-5 (t(37) = 3.71, P < 0.005) and Slow-4 (t(37) = 3.75, P < 0.005) than sham feedback (Figure 2(d)). As Figures 2(b) and 2(c) show, real feedback recruited greater ReHo in the left and right BG than sham feedback and these significant differences were only manifested in Slow-6 (t(37) = 4.38, P < 0.005 for the left BG and t(37) = 4.29, P < 0.005 for the right BG).

Bottom Line: Conventional functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies on motor feedback employ periodical blocked paradigm which does not allow frequency analysis of brain activity.Our results revealed that the five subfrequency bands of brain activity contributed to the changes of ReHo between real and sham feedback differently, and, more importantly, the changes in basal ganglia were only manifested in Slow-6, implicating the fact that ReHo in ultraslow band may be associated with the functional significance of BG, that is, motor control.These findings provide novel insights into the neural substrate underlying motor feedback, and properties of the ultraslow band of local synchronization deserve more attention in future explorations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center for Biomedical Imaging, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055, China ; Center for Cognition and Brain Disorders and the Affiliated Hospital, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310015, China ; Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Research in Assessment of Cognitive Impairments, Hangzhou 310015, China.

ABSTRACT
Conventional functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies on motor feedback employ periodical blocked paradigm which does not allow frequency analysis of brain activity. Here, we carried out an fMRI study by using a continuous paradigm, that is, continuous (8 min) feedback of finger force. Borrowing an analytic method widely used in resting-state fMRI studies, that is, regional homogeneity (ReHo), we compared the local synchronization in some subfrequency bands between real and sham feedback, and the subbands were defined as Slow-6 (0.0-0.01 Hz), Slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz), Slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz), Slow-3 (0.073-0.198 Hz), and Slow-2 (0.198-0.25 Hz). Our results revealed that the five subfrequency bands of brain activity contributed to the changes of ReHo between real and sham feedback differently, and, more importantly, the changes in basal ganglia were only manifested in Slow-6, implicating the fact that ReHo in ultraslow band may be associated with the functional significance of BG, that is, motor control. These findings provide novel insights into the neural substrate underlying motor feedback, and properties of the ultraslow band of local synchronization deserve more attention in future explorations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus