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Current Advances in the Application of Raman Spectroscopy for Molecular Diagnosis of Cervical Cancer.

Ramos IR, Malkin A, Lyng FM - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: In cervical cancer, it is acknowledged as a promising biochemical tool due to its ability to detect premalignancy and early malignancy stages.This review summarizes the key research in the area and the evidence compiled is very encouraging for ongoing and further research.In addition to the diagnostic potential, promising results for HPV detection and monitoring treatment response suggest more than just a diagnosis prospective.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8, Ireland ; School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
Raman spectroscopy provides a unique biochemical fingerprint capable of identifying and characterizing the structure of molecules, cells, and tissues. In cervical cancer, it is acknowledged as a promising biochemical tool due to its ability to detect premalignancy and early malignancy stages. This review summarizes the key research in the area and the evidence compiled is very encouraging for ongoing and further research. In addition to the diagnostic potential, promising results for HPV detection and monitoring treatment response suggest more than just a diagnosis prospective. A greater body of evidence is however necessary before Raman spectroscopy is fully validated for clinical use and larger comprehensive studies are required to fully establish the role of Raman spectroscopy in the molecular diagnostics of cervical cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fingerprint region of the Raman spectrum of cervical cancer CaSki cell line. The major assignments related to glycogen, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids are highlighted.
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fig3: Fingerprint region of the Raman spectrum of cervical cancer CaSki cell line. The major assignments related to glycogen, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids are highlighted.

Mentions: Knowing the frequency of the incident light and measuring the frequency of the Raman scattered light, it is possible to calculate the vibrational energy difference. This energy is known as the Raman shift and is usually expressed in wavenumbers (cm−1) in a plot known as the Raman spectrum. Raman spectral features can be used as identification markers of particular substances because complex molecules have several specific vibrational energy modes allowing the Raman spectrum of each substance to be highly specific and distinctive [3]. Figure 2 shows an example of a Raman spectrum recorded from a cervical cancer cell line, CaSki. The full spectral range is shown from 400 to 3500 cm−1, including the fingerprint region, 400 to 1800 cm−1, and the high wavenumber (HW) region, 2800 to 3500 cm−1. Figure 3 shows the fingerprint region in more detail with the major assignments related to glycogen, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids highlighted.


Current Advances in the Application of Raman Spectroscopy for Molecular Diagnosis of Cervical Cancer.

Ramos IR, Malkin A, Lyng FM - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Fingerprint region of the Raman spectrum of cervical cancer CaSki cell line. The major assignments related to glycogen, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids are highlighted.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4477184&req=5

fig3: Fingerprint region of the Raman spectrum of cervical cancer CaSki cell line. The major assignments related to glycogen, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids are highlighted.
Mentions: Knowing the frequency of the incident light and measuring the frequency of the Raman scattered light, it is possible to calculate the vibrational energy difference. This energy is known as the Raman shift and is usually expressed in wavenumbers (cm−1) in a plot known as the Raman spectrum. Raman spectral features can be used as identification markers of particular substances because complex molecules have several specific vibrational energy modes allowing the Raman spectrum of each substance to be highly specific and distinctive [3]. Figure 2 shows an example of a Raman spectrum recorded from a cervical cancer cell line, CaSki. The full spectral range is shown from 400 to 3500 cm−1, including the fingerprint region, 400 to 1800 cm−1, and the high wavenumber (HW) region, 2800 to 3500 cm−1. Figure 3 shows the fingerprint region in more detail with the major assignments related to glycogen, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids highlighted.

Bottom Line: In cervical cancer, it is acknowledged as a promising biochemical tool due to its ability to detect premalignancy and early malignancy stages.This review summarizes the key research in the area and the evidence compiled is very encouraging for ongoing and further research.In addition to the diagnostic potential, promising results for HPV detection and monitoring treatment response suggest more than just a diagnosis prospective.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8, Ireland ; School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
Raman spectroscopy provides a unique biochemical fingerprint capable of identifying and characterizing the structure of molecules, cells, and tissues. In cervical cancer, it is acknowledged as a promising biochemical tool due to its ability to detect premalignancy and early malignancy stages. This review summarizes the key research in the area and the evidence compiled is very encouraging for ongoing and further research. In addition to the diagnostic potential, promising results for HPV detection and monitoring treatment response suggest more than just a diagnosis prospective. A greater body of evidence is however necessary before Raman spectroscopy is fully validated for clinical use and larger comprehensive studies are required to fully establish the role of Raman spectroscopy in the molecular diagnostics of cervical cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus