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Current Advances in the Application of Raman Spectroscopy for Molecular Diagnosis of Cervical Cancer.

Ramos IR, Malkin A, Lyng FM - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: In cervical cancer, it is acknowledged as a promising biochemical tool due to its ability to detect premalignancy and early malignancy stages.This review summarizes the key research in the area and the evidence compiled is very encouraging for ongoing and further research.In addition to the diagnostic potential, promising results for HPV detection and monitoring treatment response suggest more than just a diagnosis prospective.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8, Ireland ; School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
Raman spectroscopy provides a unique biochemical fingerprint capable of identifying and characterizing the structure of molecules, cells, and tissues. In cervical cancer, it is acknowledged as a promising biochemical tool due to its ability to detect premalignancy and early malignancy stages. This review summarizes the key research in the area and the evidence compiled is very encouraging for ongoing and further research. In addition to the diagnostic potential, promising results for HPV detection and monitoring treatment response suggest more than just a diagnosis prospective. A greater body of evidence is however necessary before Raman spectroscopy is fully validated for clinical use and larger comprehensive studies are required to fully establish the role of Raman spectroscopy in the molecular diagnostics of cervical cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic showing the process involved in Raman spectra collection. When the sample is illuminated by an incident monochromatic light, the majority of the scattered light is of the same wavelength—elastically scattered (green arrow). A notch filter is therefore used to block the elastically scattered light which would otherwise overwhelm the weak signal of the Raman or inelastically scattered light (orange arrow). The Raman scattered light may be dispersed according to wavelength through a grating and detected by a CCD (charge-coupled device) detector. A Raman spectrum is finally shown upon software analysis.
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fig1: Schematic showing the process involved in Raman spectra collection. When the sample is illuminated by an incident monochromatic light, the majority of the scattered light is of the same wavelength—elastically scattered (green arrow). A notch filter is therefore used to block the elastically scattered light which would otherwise overwhelm the weak signal of the Raman or inelastically scattered light (orange arrow). The Raman scattered light may be dispersed according to wavelength through a grating and detected by a CCD (charge-coupled device) detector. A Raman spectrum is finally shown upon software analysis.

Mentions: The physical phenomenon of Raman scattering, also known as the Raman effect, has been extensively studied since it was first discovered in 1928 by the Indian physicist C. V. Raman. It works on the principle that a small fraction (approximately 1 in 10 million) of the radiation scattered by certain molecules differs from that of the incident beam, and that the shift in wavelength depends upon the chemical structure of the molecules responsible for the scattering [1]. Raman spectra are acquired by irradiating a sample with a powerful laser source of usually visible or near-infrared monochromatic radiation and measuring the scattered radiation with a suitable spectrometer [1, 2]. Figure 1 shows the process involved in collection of Raman spectra.


Current Advances in the Application of Raman Spectroscopy for Molecular Diagnosis of Cervical Cancer.

Ramos IR, Malkin A, Lyng FM - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Schematic showing the process involved in Raman spectra collection. When the sample is illuminated by an incident monochromatic light, the majority of the scattered light is of the same wavelength—elastically scattered (green arrow). A notch filter is therefore used to block the elastically scattered light which would otherwise overwhelm the weak signal of the Raman or inelastically scattered light (orange arrow). The Raman scattered light may be dispersed according to wavelength through a grating and detected by a CCD (charge-coupled device) detector. A Raman spectrum is finally shown upon software analysis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4477184&req=5

fig1: Schematic showing the process involved in Raman spectra collection. When the sample is illuminated by an incident monochromatic light, the majority of the scattered light is of the same wavelength—elastically scattered (green arrow). A notch filter is therefore used to block the elastically scattered light which would otherwise overwhelm the weak signal of the Raman or inelastically scattered light (orange arrow). The Raman scattered light may be dispersed according to wavelength through a grating and detected by a CCD (charge-coupled device) detector. A Raman spectrum is finally shown upon software analysis.
Mentions: The physical phenomenon of Raman scattering, also known as the Raman effect, has been extensively studied since it was first discovered in 1928 by the Indian physicist C. V. Raman. It works on the principle that a small fraction (approximately 1 in 10 million) of the radiation scattered by certain molecules differs from that of the incident beam, and that the shift in wavelength depends upon the chemical structure of the molecules responsible for the scattering [1]. Raman spectra are acquired by irradiating a sample with a powerful laser source of usually visible or near-infrared monochromatic radiation and measuring the scattered radiation with a suitable spectrometer [1, 2]. Figure 1 shows the process involved in collection of Raman spectra.

Bottom Line: In cervical cancer, it is acknowledged as a promising biochemical tool due to its ability to detect premalignancy and early malignancy stages.This review summarizes the key research in the area and the evidence compiled is very encouraging for ongoing and further research.In addition to the diagnostic potential, promising results for HPV detection and monitoring treatment response suggest more than just a diagnosis prospective.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DIT Centre for Radiation and Environmental Science, Focas Research Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8, Ireland ; School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
Raman spectroscopy provides a unique biochemical fingerprint capable of identifying and characterizing the structure of molecules, cells, and tissues. In cervical cancer, it is acknowledged as a promising biochemical tool due to its ability to detect premalignancy and early malignancy stages. This review summarizes the key research in the area and the evidence compiled is very encouraging for ongoing and further research. In addition to the diagnostic potential, promising results for HPV detection and monitoring treatment response suggest more than just a diagnosis prospective. A greater body of evidence is however necessary before Raman spectroscopy is fully validated for clinical use and larger comprehensive studies are required to fully establish the role of Raman spectroscopy in the molecular diagnostics of cervical cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus