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Wild chimpanzees are infected by Trypanosoma brucei.

Jirků M, Votýpka J, Petrželková KJ, Jirků-Pomajbíková K, Kriegová E, Vodička R, Lankester F, Leendertz SA, Wittig RM, Boesch C, Modrý D, Ayala FJ, Leendertz FH, Lukeš J - Int J Parasitol Parasites Wildl (2015)

Bottom Line: Although wild chimpanzees and other African great apes live in regions endemic for African sleeping sickness, very little is known about their trypanosome infections, mainly due to major difficulties in obtaining their blood samples.The optimized technique of trypanosome detection in feces will improve our knowledge about the epidemiology of trypanosomes in primates and possibly also other endangered mammals, from which blood and tissue samples cannot be obtained.Finally, we demonstrated that the mandrill serum was able to efficiently lyse T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, and to some extent T. b. gambiense, while the chimpanzee serum failed to lyse any of these subspecies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Parasitology, Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, České Budějovice (Budweiss), Czech Republic ; Faculty of Sciences, University of South Bohemia, České Budějovice (Budweiss), Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Although wild chimpanzees and other African great apes live in regions endemic for African sleeping sickness, very little is known about their trypanosome infections, mainly due to major difficulties in obtaining their blood samples. In present work, we established a diagnostic ITS1-based PCR assay that allows detection of the DNA of all four Trypanosoma brucei subspecies (Trypanosoma brucei brucei, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, and Trypanosoma brucei evansi) in feces of experimentally infected mice. Next, using this assay we revealed the presence of trypanosomes in the fecal samples of wild chimpanzees and this finding was further supported by results obtained using a set of primate tissue samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS1 region showed that the majority of obtained sequences fell into the robust T. brucei group, providing strong evidence that these infections were caused by T. b. rhodesiense and/or T. b. gambiense. The optimized technique of trypanosome detection in feces will improve our knowledge about the epidemiology of trypanosomes in primates and possibly also other endangered mammals, from which blood and tissue samples cannot be obtained. Finally, we demonstrated that the mandrill serum was able to efficiently lyse T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, and to some extent T. b. gambiense, while the chimpanzee serum failed to lyse any of these subspecies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Survival of trypanosomes in sera. Trypanosomes were cultivated in media with human, mandrill, barbary macaque, orangutan, spider monkey and chimpanzee sera, and their relative survival was estimated using the Alamar Blue assay. The survival was standardized using FBS, with NHS used as a positive control. The experiment was performed in triplicate, bars indicate average ± SD values.2
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dfig2: Survival of trypanosomes in sera. Trypanosomes were cultivated in media with human, mandrill, barbary macaque, orangutan, spider monkey and chimpanzee sera, and their relative survival was estimated using the Alamar Blue assay. The survival was standardized using FBS, with NHS used as a positive control. The experiment was performed in triplicate, bars indicate average ± SD values.2


Wild chimpanzees are infected by Trypanosoma brucei.

Jirků M, Votýpka J, Petrželková KJ, Jirků-Pomajbíková K, Kriegová E, Vodička R, Lankester F, Leendertz SA, Wittig RM, Boesch C, Modrý D, Ayala FJ, Leendertz FH, Lukeš J - Int J Parasitol Parasites Wildl (2015)

Survival of trypanosomes in sera. Trypanosomes were cultivated in media with human, mandrill, barbary macaque, orangutan, spider monkey and chimpanzee sera, and their relative survival was estimated using the Alamar Blue assay. The survival was standardized using FBS, with NHS used as a positive control. The experiment was performed in triplicate, bars indicate average ± SD values.2
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4477118&req=5

dfig2: Survival of trypanosomes in sera. Trypanosomes were cultivated in media with human, mandrill, barbary macaque, orangutan, spider monkey and chimpanzee sera, and their relative survival was estimated using the Alamar Blue assay. The survival was standardized using FBS, with NHS used as a positive control. The experiment was performed in triplicate, bars indicate average ± SD values.2
Bottom Line: Although wild chimpanzees and other African great apes live in regions endemic for African sleeping sickness, very little is known about their trypanosome infections, mainly due to major difficulties in obtaining their blood samples.The optimized technique of trypanosome detection in feces will improve our knowledge about the epidemiology of trypanosomes in primates and possibly also other endangered mammals, from which blood and tissue samples cannot be obtained.Finally, we demonstrated that the mandrill serum was able to efficiently lyse T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, and to some extent T. b. gambiense, while the chimpanzee serum failed to lyse any of these subspecies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Parasitology, Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, České Budějovice (Budweiss), Czech Republic ; Faculty of Sciences, University of South Bohemia, České Budějovice (Budweiss), Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Although wild chimpanzees and other African great apes live in regions endemic for African sleeping sickness, very little is known about their trypanosome infections, mainly due to major difficulties in obtaining their blood samples. In present work, we established a diagnostic ITS1-based PCR assay that allows detection of the DNA of all four Trypanosoma brucei subspecies (Trypanosoma brucei brucei, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, and Trypanosoma brucei evansi) in feces of experimentally infected mice. Next, using this assay we revealed the presence of trypanosomes in the fecal samples of wild chimpanzees and this finding was further supported by results obtained using a set of primate tissue samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the ITS1 region showed that the majority of obtained sequences fell into the robust T. brucei group, providing strong evidence that these infections were caused by T. b. rhodesiense and/or T. b. gambiense. The optimized technique of trypanosome detection in feces will improve our knowledge about the epidemiology of trypanosomes in primates and possibly also other endangered mammals, from which blood and tissue samples cannot be obtained. Finally, we demonstrated that the mandrill serum was able to efficiently lyse T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense, and to some extent T. b. gambiense, while the chimpanzee serum failed to lyse any of these subspecies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus