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Preference bias of head orientation in choosing between two non-durables.

Funaya H, Shibata T - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: We used real non-durable products (cheap snacks and clothing) on a shopping shelf.The results showed that there was a significant preference bias in head orientation at the beginning 1 s when the subjects stood straight toward the shelf, and that the head orientation was more biased toward the selected item than the gaze and the center of pressure at the ending 1 s.Manipulating body orientation did not affect the result of choice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology Kitakyushu City, Fukuoka, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The goal of this study is to investigate how customers' gaze, head and body orientations reflect their choices. Although the relationship between human choice and gaze behavior has been well-studied, other behaviors such as head and body are unknown. We conducted a two-alternatives-forced-choice task to examine (1) whether preference bias, i.e., a positional bias in gaze, head and body toward the item that was later chosen, exists in choice, (2) when preference bias is observed and when prediction of the resulting choice becomes possible (3) whether human choice is affected when the body orientations are manipulated. We used real non-durable products (cheap snacks and clothing) on a shopping shelf. The results showed that there was a significant preference bias in head orientation at the beginning 1 s when the subjects stood straight toward the shelf, and that the head orientation was more biased toward the selected item than the gaze and the center of pressure at the ending 1 s. Manipulating body orientation did not affect the result of choice. The preference bias detected by observing the head orientation would be useful in marketing science for predicting customers' choice.

No MeSH data available.


Experimental setup of shelf: a, webcam; b, AR marker for locating of the center of the two alternatives; c, items horizontally aligned; d, Wii Balance Board (WBB); and e, eye tracker (EMR-9). Shelf top height dh = 98 (cm) and distance between WBB and shelf dw = 35 (cm). The subject wearing the eye tracker stands on a WBB after the operator gives a cue. The shelf was a commercial shelf used in real stores.
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Figure 1: Experimental setup of shelf: a, webcam; b, AR marker for locating of the center of the two alternatives; c, items horizontally aligned; d, Wii Balance Board (WBB); and e, eye tracker (EMR-9). Shelf top height dh = 98 (cm) and distance between WBB and shelf dw = 35 (cm). The subject wearing the eye tracker stands on a WBB after the operator gives a cue. The shelf was a commercial shelf used in real stores.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows an overview of the experimental setup. The presented items were cheap non-durables from two categories: snacks (worth 1–2 U.S. dollars) and clothing (worth 5–20 U.S. dollars). In total 18 pairs of snacks and cloths were prepared while 12 pairs were randomly chosen for every experiment. The remaining 6 pairs were used for instruction and for operational mistakes such as invalid recordings that were found during the experiments. Each pair consisted of two items similar in size and appearance, e.g., chocolates of different flavors, pairs of socks, T-shirts of the same size, etc. The size of the items varied from small chocolates (5 × 12 [cm]) to large sweaters (30 × 40 [cm]). The distance between the left edge of the right item and the right edge of the left item was kept under 20 [cm].


Preference bias of head orientation in choosing between two non-durables.

Funaya H, Shibata T - Front Psychol (2015)

Experimental setup of shelf: a, webcam; b, AR marker for locating of the center of the two alternatives; c, items horizontally aligned; d, Wii Balance Board (WBB); and e, eye tracker (EMR-9). Shelf top height dh = 98 (cm) and distance between WBB and shelf dw = 35 (cm). The subject wearing the eye tracker stands on a WBB after the operator gives a cue. The shelf was a commercial shelf used in real stores.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4477059&req=5

Figure 1: Experimental setup of shelf: a, webcam; b, AR marker for locating of the center of the two alternatives; c, items horizontally aligned; d, Wii Balance Board (WBB); and e, eye tracker (EMR-9). Shelf top height dh = 98 (cm) and distance between WBB and shelf dw = 35 (cm). The subject wearing the eye tracker stands on a WBB after the operator gives a cue. The shelf was a commercial shelf used in real stores.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows an overview of the experimental setup. The presented items were cheap non-durables from two categories: snacks (worth 1–2 U.S. dollars) and clothing (worth 5–20 U.S. dollars). In total 18 pairs of snacks and cloths were prepared while 12 pairs were randomly chosen for every experiment. The remaining 6 pairs were used for instruction and for operational mistakes such as invalid recordings that were found during the experiments. Each pair consisted of two items similar in size and appearance, e.g., chocolates of different flavors, pairs of socks, T-shirts of the same size, etc. The size of the items varied from small chocolates (5 × 12 [cm]) to large sweaters (30 × 40 [cm]). The distance between the left edge of the right item and the right edge of the left item was kept under 20 [cm].

Bottom Line: We used real non-durable products (cheap snacks and clothing) on a shopping shelf.The results showed that there was a significant preference bias in head orientation at the beginning 1 s when the subjects stood straight toward the shelf, and that the head orientation was more biased toward the selected item than the gaze and the center of pressure at the ending 1 s.Manipulating body orientation did not affect the result of choice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology Kitakyushu City, Fukuoka, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The goal of this study is to investigate how customers' gaze, head and body orientations reflect their choices. Although the relationship between human choice and gaze behavior has been well-studied, other behaviors such as head and body are unknown. We conducted a two-alternatives-forced-choice task to examine (1) whether preference bias, i.e., a positional bias in gaze, head and body toward the item that was later chosen, exists in choice, (2) when preference bias is observed and when prediction of the resulting choice becomes possible (3) whether human choice is affected when the body orientations are manipulated. We used real non-durable products (cheap snacks and clothing) on a shopping shelf. The results showed that there was a significant preference bias in head orientation at the beginning 1 s when the subjects stood straight toward the shelf, and that the head orientation was more biased toward the selected item than the gaze and the center of pressure at the ending 1 s. Manipulating body orientation did not affect the result of choice. The preference bias detected by observing the head orientation would be useful in marketing science for predicting customers' choice.

No MeSH data available.