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Caffeine Consumption and Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Response to Regadenoson.

Bitar A, Mastouri R, Kreutz RP - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We intended to examine the effect of caffeine consumption and of timing of last dose on hemodynamic effects after regadenoson administration for cardiac stress testing. 332 subjects undergoing regadenoson stress testing were enrolled.Non-coffee drinkers (group 1) (73 subjects) and subjects who last drank coffee >24 hours (group 3) (139 subjects) prior to regadenoson did not demonstrate any difference in systolic blood pressure, heart rate change, maximal predicted heart rate and percent change in heart rate.These results suggest that caffeine exposure within 24 hours may reduce the effects of regadenoson administered for vasodilatory cardiac stress testing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Krannert Institute of Cardiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Current guidelines recommend that caffeinated products should be avoided for at least 12 hours prior to regadenoson administration. We intended to examine the effect of caffeine consumption and of timing of last dose on hemodynamic effects after regadenoson administration for cardiac stress testing.

Methods: 332 subjects undergoing regadenoson stress testing were enrolled. Baseline characteristics, habits of coffee/caffeine exposure, baseline vital signs and change in heart rate, blood pressure, percent of maximal predicted heart rate, and percent change in heart rate were prospectively collected.

Results: Non-coffee drinkers (group 1) (73 subjects) and subjects who last drank coffee >24 hours (group 3) (139 subjects) prior to regadenoson did not demonstrate any difference in systolic blood pressure, heart rate change, maximal predicted heart rate and percent change in heart rate. Systolic blood pressure change (15.2±17.1 vs. 7.2±10.2 mmHg, p = 0.001), heart rate change (32.2±14 vs. 27.3±9.6 bpm, p = 0.038) and maximal predicted heart rate (65.5±15.6 vs. 60.7±8.6%, p = 0.038) were significantly higher in non-coffee drinkers (group 1) compared to those who drank coffee 12-24 hours prior (group 2) (108 subjects). Subjects who drank coffee >24 hours prior (group 3) exhibited higher systolic blood pressure change (13±15.8 vs. 7±10.2, p = 0.007), and heart rate change (32.1±15.3 vs. 27.3±9.6, p = 0.017) as compared to those who drank coffee 12-24 hours prior to testing (group 2).

Conclusions: Caffeine exposure 12-24 hours prior to regadenoson administration attenuates the vasoactive effects of regadenoson, as evidenced by a blunted rise in heart rate and systolic blood pressure. These results suggest that caffeine exposure within 24 hours may reduce the effects of regadenoson administered for vasodilatory cardiac stress testing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Regadenoson Effect on SBP change, HR change, %MPHR and % changeHR According to Coffee Consumption.Group 1: non-coffee drinkers; Group 2: subjects who drank coffee 12–24 hours prior to stress test; Group 3: subjects who drank coffee more than 24 hours prior to stress test. Error bars correspond to 95% confidence interval.
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pone.0130487.g001: Regadenoson Effect on SBP change, HR change, %MPHR and % changeHR According to Coffee Consumption.Group 1: non-coffee drinkers; Group 2: subjects who drank coffee 12–24 hours prior to stress test; Group 3: subjects who drank coffee more than 24 hours prior to stress test. Error bars correspond to 95% confidence interval.

Mentions: There was no significant difference in SBP change (15.2±17.1 vs. 13.01±15.8 mmHg, p = NS), HR change (32.2±14 vs. 32.1±15.3 bpm, p = NS), %MPHR (65.5±15.6 vs. 64.3±13.6%, p = NS), and %Change HR (44.8±19.7 vs. 46.8±23.7%, p = NS) between non-coffee drinkers (group 1) and those who drank coffee >24 hours prior (group 3). Moreover, subjects who drank coffee >24 hours prior (group 3) exhibited higher SBP change (13±15.8 vs. 7±10.2, p = 0.007) and HR change (32.1±15.3 vs. 27.3±9.6, p = 0.017) as compared to those who drank coffee 12–24 hours prior to testing (group 2). MPHR (64.3±13.6 vs. 60.7±8.6%, p = 0.077) and %Change HR (46.82±23.7 vs. 40.7±15.76%, p = 0.053) were higher among group 3 compared to group 2 but failed to achieve statistical significance (Table 2) (Fig 1).


Caffeine Consumption and Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Response to Regadenoson.

Bitar A, Mastouri R, Kreutz RP - PLoS ONE (2015)

Regadenoson Effect on SBP change, HR change, %MPHR and % changeHR According to Coffee Consumption.Group 1: non-coffee drinkers; Group 2: subjects who drank coffee 12–24 hours prior to stress test; Group 3: subjects who drank coffee more than 24 hours prior to stress test. Error bars correspond to 95% confidence interval.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4476756&req=5

pone.0130487.g001: Regadenoson Effect on SBP change, HR change, %MPHR and % changeHR According to Coffee Consumption.Group 1: non-coffee drinkers; Group 2: subjects who drank coffee 12–24 hours prior to stress test; Group 3: subjects who drank coffee more than 24 hours prior to stress test. Error bars correspond to 95% confidence interval.
Mentions: There was no significant difference in SBP change (15.2±17.1 vs. 13.01±15.8 mmHg, p = NS), HR change (32.2±14 vs. 32.1±15.3 bpm, p = NS), %MPHR (65.5±15.6 vs. 64.3±13.6%, p = NS), and %Change HR (44.8±19.7 vs. 46.8±23.7%, p = NS) between non-coffee drinkers (group 1) and those who drank coffee >24 hours prior (group 3). Moreover, subjects who drank coffee >24 hours prior (group 3) exhibited higher SBP change (13±15.8 vs. 7±10.2, p = 0.007) and HR change (32.1±15.3 vs. 27.3±9.6, p = 0.017) as compared to those who drank coffee 12–24 hours prior to testing (group 2). MPHR (64.3±13.6 vs. 60.7±8.6%, p = 0.077) and %Change HR (46.82±23.7 vs. 40.7±15.76%, p = 0.053) were higher among group 3 compared to group 2 but failed to achieve statistical significance (Table 2) (Fig 1).

Bottom Line: We intended to examine the effect of caffeine consumption and of timing of last dose on hemodynamic effects after regadenoson administration for cardiac stress testing. 332 subjects undergoing regadenoson stress testing were enrolled.Non-coffee drinkers (group 1) (73 subjects) and subjects who last drank coffee >24 hours (group 3) (139 subjects) prior to regadenoson did not demonstrate any difference in systolic blood pressure, heart rate change, maximal predicted heart rate and percent change in heart rate.These results suggest that caffeine exposure within 24 hours may reduce the effects of regadenoson administered for vasodilatory cardiac stress testing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Krannert Institute of Cardiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Current guidelines recommend that caffeinated products should be avoided for at least 12 hours prior to regadenoson administration. We intended to examine the effect of caffeine consumption and of timing of last dose on hemodynamic effects after regadenoson administration for cardiac stress testing.

Methods: 332 subjects undergoing regadenoson stress testing were enrolled. Baseline characteristics, habits of coffee/caffeine exposure, baseline vital signs and change in heart rate, blood pressure, percent of maximal predicted heart rate, and percent change in heart rate were prospectively collected.

Results: Non-coffee drinkers (group 1) (73 subjects) and subjects who last drank coffee >24 hours (group 3) (139 subjects) prior to regadenoson did not demonstrate any difference in systolic blood pressure, heart rate change, maximal predicted heart rate and percent change in heart rate. Systolic blood pressure change (15.2±17.1 vs. 7.2±10.2 mmHg, p = 0.001), heart rate change (32.2±14 vs. 27.3±9.6 bpm, p = 0.038) and maximal predicted heart rate (65.5±15.6 vs. 60.7±8.6%, p = 0.038) were significantly higher in non-coffee drinkers (group 1) compared to those who drank coffee 12-24 hours prior (group 2) (108 subjects). Subjects who drank coffee >24 hours prior (group 3) exhibited higher systolic blood pressure change (13±15.8 vs. 7±10.2, p = 0.007), and heart rate change (32.1±15.3 vs. 27.3±9.6, p = 0.017) as compared to those who drank coffee 12-24 hours prior to testing (group 2).

Conclusions: Caffeine exposure 12-24 hours prior to regadenoson administration attenuates the vasoactive effects of regadenoson, as evidenced by a blunted rise in heart rate and systolic blood pressure. These results suggest that caffeine exposure within 24 hours may reduce the effects of regadenoson administered for vasodilatory cardiac stress testing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus