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Non Digestible Oligosaccharides Modulate the Gut Microbiota to Control the Development of Leukemia and Associated Cachexia in Mice.

Bindels LB, Neyrinck AM, Salazar N, Taminiau B, Druart C, Muccioli GG, François E, Blecker C, Richel A, Daube G, Mahillon J, de los Reyes-Gavilán CG, Cani PD, Delzenne NM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: INU supplementation increased the portal SCFA propionate and butyrate, and decreased cancer cell invasion in the liver.POS treatment did not affect hepatic cancer cell invasion, but was more efficient than INU to decrease the metabolic alterations.Non digestible carbohydrates with prebiotic properties may constitute a new nutritional strategy to modulate gut microbiota with positive consequences on cancer progression and associated cachexia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Metabolism and Nutrition Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
We tested the hypothesis that changing the gut microbiota using pectic oligosaccharides (POS) or inulin (INU) differently modulates the progression of leukemia and related metabolic disorders. Mice were transplanted with Bcr-Abl-transfected proB lymphocytes mimicking leukemia and received either POS or INU in their diet (5%) for 2 weeks. Combination of pyrosequencing, PCR-DGGE and qPCR analyses of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that POS decreased microbial diversity and richness of caecal microbiota whereas it increased Bifidobacterium spp., Roseburia spp. and Bacteroides spp. (affecting specifically B. dorei) to a higher extent than INU. INU supplementation increased the portal SCFA propionate and butyrate, and decreased cancer cell invasion in the liver. POS treatment did not affect hepatic cancer cell invasion, but was more efficient than INU to decrease the metabolic alterations. Indeed, POS better than INU delayed anorexia linked to cancer progression. In addition, POS treatment increased acetate in the caecal content, changed the fatty acid profile inside adipose tissue and counteracted the induction of markers controlling β-oxidation, thereby hampering fat mass loss. Non digestible carbohydrates with prebiotic properties may constitute a new nutritional strategy to modulate gut microbiota with positive consequences on cancer progression and associated cachexia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

qPCR analysis of the caecal luminal microbiota.Levels of total bacteria (A), Lactobacillus spp. (B), Akkermansia muciniphila (C), Roseburia spp. (D), Bifidobacterium spp. (E), Bifidobacterium animalis (F), Bacteroides/Prevotella spp. (G) and Bacteroides dorei/ Bacteroides vulgatus (H). Data with different superscript letters are significantly different.
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pone.0131009.g002: qPCR analysis of the caecal luminal microbiota.Levels of total bacteria (A), Lactobacillus spp. (B), Akkermansia muciniphila (C), Roseburia spp. (D), Bifidobacterium spp. (E), Bifidobacterium animalis (F), Bacteroides/Prevotella spp. (G) and Bacteroides dorei/ Bacteroides vulgatus (H). Data with different superscript letters are significantly different.

Mentions: A qPCR approach was used to confirm results obtained by pyrosequencing and PCR-DGGE, and to detect other species important to take into account in the prebiotic context and that were not (or weakly) detected through pyrosequencing such as Bifidobacterium spp. (in particular Bifidobacterium animalis), Lactobacillus spp., Roseburia spp. and Akkermansia spp. (Fig 2). Among those bacteria, Bifidobacterium spp. was the only genus observed to be significantly decreased by the BaF injection. In contrast to INU, POS administration increased total bacteria. Interestingly, the increase of Bacteroides/Prevotella spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. was greater with POS treatment than INU treatment. Both treatments increased caecal content of Roseburia spp. and B. animalis to the same extent. Of note, the abundance of Akkermansia spp., even if it largely increased in two mice in the POS group, was not significantly affected by the dietary treatments. Importantly, we confirmed the specific increase of B. dorei/B. vulgatus after POS administration. In this study, pyrosequencing targeted a different hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene than the PCR-DGGE and qPCR analysis, allowing us to differentiate B. dorei from B. vulgatus and draw the conclusion that POS administration increases B. dorei.


Non Digestible Oligosaccharides Modulate the Gut Microbiota to Control the Development of Leukemia and Associated Cachexia in Mice.

Bindels LB, Neyrinck AM, Salazar N, Taminiau B, Druart C, Muccioli GG, François E, Blecker C, Richel A, Daube G, Mahillon J, de los Reyes-Gavilán CG, Cani PD, Delzenne NM - PLoS ONE (2015)

qPCR analysis of the caecal luminal microbiota.Levels of total bacteria (A), Lactobacillus spp. (B), Akkermansia muciniphila (C), Roseburia spp. (D), Bifidobacterium spp. (E), Bifidobacterium animalis (F), Bacteroides/Prevotella spp. (G) and Bacteroides dorei/ Bacteroides vulgatus (H). Data with different superscript letters are significantly different.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4476728&req=5

pone.0131009.g002: qPCR analysis of the caecal luminal microbiota.Levels of total bacteria (A), Lactobacillus spp. (B), Akkermansia muciniphila (C), Roseburia spp. (D), Bifidobacterium spp. (E), Bifidobacterium animalis (F), Bacteroides/Prevotella spp. (G) and Bacteroides dorei/ Bacteroides vulgatus (H). Data with different superscript letters are significantly different.
Mentions: A qPCR approach was used to confirm results obtained by pyrosequencing and PCR-DGGE, and to detect other species important to take into account in the prebiotic context and that were not (or weakly) detected through pyrosequencing such as Bifidobacterium spp. (in particular Bifidobacterium animalis), Lactobacillus spp., Roseburia spp. and Akkermansia spp. (Fig 2). Among those bacteria, Bifidobacterium spp. was the only genus observed to be significantly decreased by the BaF injection. In contrast to INU, POS administration increased total bacteria. Interestingly, the increase of Bacteroides/Prevotella spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. was greater with POS treatment than INU treatment. Both treatments increased caecal content of Roseburia spp. and B. animalis to the same extent. Of note, the abundance of Akkermansia spp., even if it largely increased in two mice in the POS group, was not significantly affected by the dietary treatments. Importantly, we confirmed the specific increase of B. dorei/B. vulgatus after POS administration. In this study, pyrosequencing targeted a different hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene than the PCR-DGGE and qPCR analysis, allowing us to differentiate B. dorei from B. vulgatus and draw the conclusion that POS administration increases B. dorei.

Bottom Line: INU supplementation increased the portal SCFA propionate and butyrate, and decreased cancer cell invasion in the liver.POS treatment did not affect hepatic cancer cell invasion, but was more efficient than INU to decrease the metabolic alterations.Non digestible carbohydrates with prebiotic properties may constitute a new nutritional strategy to modulate gut microbiota with positive consequences on cancer progression and associated cachexia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Metabolism and Nutrition Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
We tested the hypothesis that changing the gut microbiota using pectic oligosaccharides (POS) or inulin (INU) differently modulates the progression of leukemia and related metabolic disorders. Mice were transplanted with Bcr-Abl-transfected proB lymphocytes mimicking leukemia and received either POS or INU in their diet (5%) for 2 weeks. Combination of pyrosequencing, PCR-DGGE and qPCR analyses of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that POS decreased microbial diversity and richness of caecal microbiota whereas it increased Bifidobacterium spp., Roseburia spp. and Bacteroides spp. (affecting specifically B. dorei) to a higher extent than INU. INU supplementation increased the portal SCFA propionate and butyrate, and decreased cancer cell invasion in the liver. POS treatment did not affect hepatic cancer cell invasion, but was more efficient than INU to decrease the metabolic alterations. Indeed, POS better than INU delayed anorexia linked to cancer progression. In addition, POS treatment increased acetate in the caecal content, changed the fatty acid profile inside adipose tissue and counteracted the induction of markers controlling β-oxidation, thereby hampering fat mass loss. Non digestible carbohydrates with prebiotic properties may constitute a new nutritional strategy to modulate gut microbiota with positive consequences on cancer progression and associated cachexia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus