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Brain Signature Predicts Negative Emotion in Individuals.

Weaver J - PLoS Biol. (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Freelance Science Writer, Carbondale, Colorado, United States of America.

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The researchers then used machine-learning algorithms to find global patterns of brain activity that best predicted participants’ ratings... This neural signature, called the picture-induced negative emotion signature (PINES), accurately predicted ratings of negative emotional experience in 94% of the participants... In more than 90% of the subjects, the PINES accurately distinguished between aversive pictures whose ratings were separated by two or more points on the five-point scale... As expected, aversive pictures produced activity in brain regions typically associated with negative emotion, including the amygdala, anterior insula, and anterior cingulate cortex... However, activity in each of these regions was not strong enough to predict emotion ratings... Moreover, the PINES more accurately predicted emotion ratings than did activity in seven other previously reported neural networks associated with diverse functions such as rest, vision, attention, touch, and movement... The researchers next used algorithms to separate the PINES brain regions into discrete subnetworks based on similar patterns of activity from trial to trial... Several of these subnetworks individually performed well at predicting emotion ratings, but all of them were less accurate than the PINES... Using a virtual lesion analysis, the researchers found that removing individual subnetworks from the PINES resulted in only negligible decreases in performance... Finally, the researchers determined whether the PINES is specific to negative emotion and is not driven simply by general arousal... To do so, they compared the PINES to their previously reported neurologic pain signature (NPS)—a brain map that predicts the intensity of thermal pain... Conversely, the NPS responded robustly to increasing pain but showed no response to increasing negative emotion... Taken together, the results suggest that the neural signature predicting negative emotion spans multiple brain systems and cannot be boiled down to a single network or a few brain regions that are traditionally associated with negative emotion.

No MeSH data available.


Luke Chang, Tor Wager, and colleagues used images similar to this to elicit negative emotions in the study participants while their brains were being scanned.Image credit: AndreasS, Flickr.
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pbio.1002179.g001: Luke Chang, Tor Wager, and colleagues used images similar to this to elicit negative emotions in the study participants while their brains were being scanned.Image credit: AndreasS, Flickr.

Mentions: In the new study, the researchers used fMRI to measure brain activity in 183 individuals who viewed a sequence of 15 negative photographs and 15 neutral photographs and rated the emotional intensity of each image on a five-point scale. The negative photographs depicted bodily illness and injury, acts of aggression, members of hate groups, transportation accidents, and human waste, whereas the neutral photographs consisted of inanimate objects or nonevocative scenes (Fig 1).


Brain Signature Predicts Negative Emotion in Individuals.

Weaver J - PLoS Biol. (2015)

Luke Chang, Tor Wager, and colleagues used images similar to this to elicit negative emotions in the study participants while their brains were being scanned.Image credit: AndreasS, Flickr.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4476724&req=5

pbio.1002179.g001: Luke Chang, Tor Wager, and colleagues used images similar to this to elicit negative emotions in the study participants while their brains were being scanned.Image credit: AndreasS, Flickr.
Mentions: In the new study, the researchers used fMRI to measure brain activity in 183 individuals who viewed a sequence of 15 negative photographs and 15 neutral photographs and rated the emotional intensity of each image on a five-point scale. The negative photographs depicted bodily illness and injury, acts of aggression, members of hate groups, transportation accidents, and human waste, whereas the neutral photographs consisted of inanimate objects or nonevocative scenes (Fig 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Freelance Science Writer, Carbondale, Colorado, United States of America.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

The researchers then used machine-learning algorithms to find global patterns of brain activity that best predicted participants’ ratings... This neural signature, called the picture-induced negative emotion signature (PINES), accurately predicted ratings of negative emotional experience in 94% of the participants... In more than 90% of the subjects, the PINES accurately distinguished between aversive pictures whose ratings were separated by two or more points on the five-point scale... As expected, aversive pictures produced activity in brain regions typically associated with negative emotion, including the amygdala, anterior insula, and anterior cingulate cortex... However, activity in each of these regions was not strong enough to predict emotion ratings... Moreover, the PINES more accurately predicted emotion ratings than did activity in seven other previously reported neural networks associated with diverse functions such as rest, vision, attention, touch, and movement... The researchers next used algorithms to separate the PINES brain regions into discrete subnetworks based on similar patterns of activity from trial to trial... Several of these subnetworks individually performed well at predicting emotion ratings, but all of them were less accurate than the PINES... Using a virtual lesion analysis, the researchers found that removing individual subnetworks from the PINES resulted in only negligible decreases in performance... Finally, the researchers determined whether the PINES is specific to negative emotion and is not driven simply by general arousal... To do so, they compared the PINES to their previously reported neurologic pain signature (NPS)—a brain map that predicts the intensity of thermal pain... Conversely, the NPS responded robustly to increasing pain but showed no response to increasing negative emotion... Taken together, the results suggest that the neural signature predicting negative emotion spans multiple brain systems and cannot be boiled down to a single network or a few brain regions that are traditionally associated with negative emotion.

No MeSH data available.