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Computer-Based Cognitive Programs for Improvement of Memory, Processing Speed and Executive Function during Age-Related Cognitive Decline: A Meta-Analysis.

Shao YK, Mang J, Li PL, Wang J, Deng T, Xu ZX - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of a random-effects model were calculated.The aggregated results indicate that CCP improves memory performance (SMD, 0.31; 95% CI 0.16 to 0.45; p < 0.0001) and processing speed (SMD, 0.50; 95% CI 0.14 to 0.87; p = 0.007) but not executive function (SMD, -0.12; 95% CI -0.33 to 0.09; p = 0.27).However, more studies with longer follow-ups are warranted to confirm the current findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, China-Japan Union Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Several studies have assessed the effects of computer-based cognitive programs (CCP) in the management of age-related cognitive decline, but the role of CCP remains controversial. Therefore, this systematic review evaluated the evidence on the efficacy of CCP for age-related cognitive decline in healthy older adults.

Methods: Six electronic databases (through October 2014) were searched. The risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration tool. The standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of a random-effects model were calculated. The heterogeneity was assessed using the Cochran Q statistic and quantified with the I2 index.

Results: Twelve studies were included in the current review and were considered as moderate to high methodological quality. The aggregated results indicate that CCP improves memory performance (SMD, 0.31; 95% CI 0.16 to 0.45; p < 0.0001) and processing speed (SMD, 0.50; 95% CI 0.14 to 0.87; p = 0.007) but not executive function (SMD, -0.12; 95% CI -0.33 to 0.09; p = 0.27). Furthermore, there were long-term gains in memory performance (SMD, 0.59; 95% CI 0.13 to 1.05; p = 0.01).

Conclusion: CCP may be a valid complementary and alternative therapy for age-related cognitive decline, especially for memory performance and processing speed. However, more studies with longer follow-ups are warranted to confirm the current findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram of study selection.RCTs: randomized controlled trials.
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pone.0130831.g001: Flow diagram of study selection.RCTs: randomized controlled trials.

Mentions: The detailed search process is illustrated in Fig 1. A total of 188 records were retrieved after removing duplicates. In total, 46 full-text publications were identified after screening the titles and abstracts. Based on the inclusion criteria, 12 studies were included in the review [14–18,22–28]. During the full-text screening, 34 studies were excluded due to unavailable data [29–31] (n = 3), no cognitive measures (n = 5), old/young mix (n = 10) and unhealthy seniors (n = 16). During conducting this review, the related experts were contacted, but there were not more information such as unpublished data, ongoing research, etc.


Computer-Based Cognitive Programs for Improvement of Memory, Processing Speed and Executive Function during Age-Related Cognitive Decline: A Meta-Analysis.

Shao YK, Mang J, Li PL, Wang J, Deng T, Xu ZX - PLoS ONE (2015)

Flow diagram of study selection.RCTs: randomized controlled trials.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4476706&req=5

pone.0130831.g001: Flow diagram of study selection.RCTs: randomized controlled trials.
Mentions: The detailed search process is illustrated in Fig 1. A total of 188 records were retrieved after removing duplicates. In total, 46 full-text publications were identified after screening the titles and abstracts. Based on the inclusion criteria, 12 studies were included in the review [14–18,22–28]. During the full-text screening, 34 studies were excluded due to unavailable data [29–31] (n = 3), no cognitive measures (n = 5), old/young mix (n = 10) and unhealthy seniors (n = 16). During conducting this review, the related experts were contacted, but there were not more information such as unpublished data, ongoing research, etc.

Bottom Line: The standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of a random-effects model were calculated.The aggregated results indicate that CCP improves memory performance (SMD, 0.31; 95% CI 0.16 to 0.45; p < 0.0001) and processing speed (SMD, 0.50; 95% CI 0.14 to 0.87; p = 0.007) but not executive function (SMD, -0.12; 95% CI -0.33 to 0.09; p = 0.27).However, more studies with longer follow-ups are warranted to confirm the current findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, China-Japan Union Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Several studies have assessed the effects of computer-based cognitive programs (CCP) in the management of age-related cognitive decline, but the role of CCP remains controversial. Therefore, this systematic review evaluated the evidence on the efficacy of CCP for age-related cognitive decline in healthy older adults.

Methods: Six electronic databases (through October 2014) were searched. The risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration tool. The standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of a random-effects model were calculated. The heterogeneity was assessed using the Cochran Q statistic and quantified with the I2 index.

Results: Twelve studies were included in the current review and were considered as moderate to high methodological quality. The aggregated results indicate that CCP improves memory performance (SMD, 0.31; 95% CI 0.16 to 0.45; p < 0.0001) and processing speed (SMD, 0.50; 95% CI 0.14 to 0.87; p = 0.007) but not executive function (SMD, -0.12; 95% CI -0.33 to 0.09; p = 0.27). Furthermore, there were long-term gains in memory performance (SMD, 0.59; 95% CI 0.13 to 1.05; p = 0.01).

Conclusion: CCP may be a valid complementary and alternative therapy for age-related cognitive decline, especially for memory performance and processing speed. However, more studies with longer follow-ups are warranted to confirm the current findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus