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Evaluation of a Brief Personalised Intervention for Alcohol Consumption in College Students.

Clarke NC, Field M, Rose AK - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The study was a between subjects design and half the participants were randomly allocated to the BPI group (N=52), who received 10 minutes personalised feedback on their drinking in addition to the alcohol-related quiz.At a two-week follow-up, participants (N=103) repeated the questionnaire battery, and attempted to recall the answers to the alcohol quiz.We conclude that the provision of generalised information can be as efficient as a BPI for the reduction of alcohol consumption in students.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
In the current study we investigated the effect of a brief personalised feedback intervention (BPI), compared to an active control intervention, on outcome measures of (i) alcohol consumption (ii) frequency of binge drinking and (iii) readiness to change (RTC). A sample of 103 college students (mean age=23.85) who consumed alcohol regularly provided baseline measures of drinking behaviour and readiness to change before completing an alcohol-related quiz on the UK Department of Health's Change4Life website (active control). The study was a between subjects design and half the participants were randomly allocated to the BPI group (N=52), who received 10 minutes personalised feedback on their drinking in addition to the alcohol-related quiz. At a two-week follow-up, participants (N=103) repeated the questionnaire battery, and attempted to recall the answers to the alcohol quiz. Results indicated that both groups significantly reduced their alcohol consumption and frequency of binge drinking but there were no significant group differences in either of these measures. We conclude that the provision of generalised information can be as efficient as a BPI for the reduction of alcohol consumption in students.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Weekly unit consumption at baseline and follow-up by condition.
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pone.0131229.g001: Weekly unit consumption at baseline and follow-up by condition.

Mentions: The analysis of weekly unit consumption (Fig 1) revealed a significant main effect of time, F(1, 101) = 18.52, p = 0.001, ηp² = 0.16, with consumption decreasing significantly in both the BPI group, t(1, 51) = 3.24, p = 0.002 and the active control group t(1, 50) = 2.85, p = 0.006. The main effect of group, F(1, 101) = 0.48, p = 0.49 and the group x time interaction, F(1, 101) = 0.03, p = 0.86, were not statistically significant.


Evaluation of a Brief Personalised Intervention for Alcohol Consumption in College Students.

Clarke NC, Field M, Rose AK - PLoS ONE (2015)

Weekly unit consumption at baseline and follow-up by condition.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4476689&req=5

pone.0131229.g001: Weekly unit consumption at baseline and follow-up by condition.
Mentions: The analysis of weekly unit consumption (Fig 1) revealed a significant main effect of time, F(1, 101) = 18.52, p = 0.001, ηp² = 0.16, with consumption decreasing significantly in both the BPI group, t(1, 51) = 3.24, p = 0.002 and the active control group t(1, 50) = 2.85, p = 0.006. The main effect of group, F(1, 101) = 0.48, p = 0.49 and the group x time interaction, F(1, 101) = 0.03, p = 0.86, were not statistically significant.

Bottom Line: The study was a between subjects design and half the participants were randomly allocated to the BPI group (N=52), who received 10 minutes personalised feedback on their drinking in addition to the alcohol-related quiz.At a two-week follow-up, participants (N=103) repeated the questionnaire battery, and attempted to recall the answers to the alcohol quiz.We conclude that the provision of generalised information can be as efficient as a BPI for the reduction of alcohol consumption in students.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
In the current study we investigated the effect of a brief personalised feedback intervention (BPI), compared to an active control intervention, on outcome measures of (i) alcohol consumption (ii) frequency of binge drinking and (iii) readiness to change (RTC). A sample of 103 college students (mean age=23.85) who consumed alcohol regularly provided baseline measures of drinking behaviour and readiness to change before completing an alcohol-related quiz on the UK Department of Health's Change4Life website (active control). The study was a between subjects design and half the participants were randomly allocated to the BPI group (N=52), who received 10 minutes personalised feedback on their drinking in addition to the alcohol-related quiz. At a two-week follow-up, participants (N=103) repeated the questionnaire battery, and attempted to recall the answers to the alcohol quiz. Results indicated that both groups significantly reduced their alcohol consumption and frequency of binge drinking but there were no significant group differences in either of these measures. We conclude that the provision of generalised information can be as efficient as a BPI for the reduction of alcohol consumption in students.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus