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Aboriginal Consumption of Estuarine Food Resources and Potential Implications for Health through Trace Metal Exposure; A Study in Gumbaynggirr Country, Australia.

Russell S, Sullivan CA, Reichelt-Brushett AJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We found 95% of the sample group fish, with the highest rate of fishing being 2-3 times a week (27%).Trace metal intake was then compared to the provisional tolerable weekly intake prescribed by the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives.This suggests the need for further investigation of this issue to minimize any possible health risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environment, Science and Engineering and Marine Ecology Research Centre Southern Cross University, Lismore, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Fishing and resource use continues to be an essential aspect of life for many Aboriginal communities throughout Australia. It is important for dietary sustenance, and also retains deep social, cultural and economic significance, playing a fundamental role in maintaining group cohesion, transferring cultural knowledge and affirming Indigenous identities. We surveyed approximately 20% of the Gumbaynggirr Aboriginal community of Nambucca Heads, New South Wales, Australia. This paper explores Gumbaynggirr Connection to Country and engagement in cultural practice. It quantifies fishing efforts and consumption of seafood within the community. We found 95% of the sample group fish, with the highest rate of fishing being 2-3 times a week (27%). Furthermore, 98% of participants eat seafood weekly or more frequently, up to more than once a day (24%). Survey results revealed that Myxus elongatus (Sand mullet) and naturally recruited Saccostrea glomerata (Sydney rock oysters) continue to be important wild resources to the Gumbaynggirr community. Trace metals were measured in M. elongatus and S. glomerata samples collected by community participants in this study. Maximum levels prescribed in the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code were not exceeded in the edible tissue for either species, however both species exceeded the generally expected levels for zinc and copper and S. glomerata samples exceeded the generally expected level for selenium. Furthermore the average dietary exposure to trace metals from consuming seafood was calculated for the surveyed population. Trace metal intake was then compared to the provisional tolerable weekly intake prescribed by the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives. This process revealed that copper and selenium intake were both within the provisional tolerable weekly intake, while there is no guideline for zinc. Furthermore, participants relying heavily on wild resources from the Nambucca River estuary may exceed the provisional tolerable weekly intake for cadmium. This suggests the need for further investigation of this issue to minimize any possible health risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Seasonality, dependence and destination of catch, and significance of the Nambucca River estuary.(a) Seasonal use of Saccostrea glomerata (Sydney rock oyster) and Myxus elongatus (Sand mullet) (n = 57), (b) times of dependence on resources (n = 60), (c) destination of catch (n = 57), (d) significance of the Nambucca River estuary (n = 59) (n = number of respondents).
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pone.0130689.g001: Seasonality, dependence and destination of catch, and significance of the Nambucca River estuary.(a) Seasonal use of Saccostrea glomerata (Sydney rock oyster) and Myxus elongatus (Sand mullet) (n = 57), (b) times of dependence on resources (n = 60), (c) destination of catch (n = 57), (d) significance of the Nambucca River estuary (n = 59) (n = number of respondents).

Mentions: From the results it is clear that there is a strong seasonal influence on S. glomerata gathering, with 95% of participants harvesting in December and peak harvesting occurs from November to February. From May to August less than 10% of people surveyed collected oysters (Fig 1a). The seasonal division was not as evident for M. elongatus, where 51% of respondents said M. elongatus was consumed on a seasonal basis (Fig 1a).


Aboriginal Consumption of Estuarine Food Resources and Potential Implications for Health through Trace Metal Exposure; A Study in Gumbaynggirr Country, Australia.

Russell S, Sullivan CA, Reichelt-Brushett AJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Seasonality, dependence and destination of catch, and significance of the Nambucca River estuary.(a) Seasonal use of Saccostrea glomerata (Sydney rock oyster) and Myxus elongatus (Sand mullet) (n = 57), (b) times of dependence on resources (n = 60), (c) destination of catch (n = 57), (d) significance of the Nambucca River estuary (n = 59) (n = number of respondents).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4476661&req=5

pone.0130689.g001: Seasonality, dependence and destination of catch, and significance of the Nambucca River estuary.(a) Seasonal use of Saccostrea glomerata (Sydney rock oyster) and Myxus elongatus (Sand mullet) (n = 57), (b) times of dependence on resources (n = 60), (c) destination of catch (n = 57), (d) significance of the Nambucca River estuary (n = 59) (n = number of respondents).
Mentions: From the results it is clear that there is a strong seasonal influence on S. glomerata gathering, with 95% of participants harvesting in December and peak harvesting occurs from November to February. From May to August less than 10% of people surveyed collected oysters (Fig 1a). The seasonal division was not as evident for M. elongatus, where 51% of respondents said M. elongatus was consumed on a seasonal basis (Fig 1a).

Bottom Line: We found 95% of the sample group fish, with the highest rate of fishing being 2-3 times a week (27%).Trace metal intake was then compared to the provisional tolerable weekly intake prescribed by the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives.This suggests the need for further investigation of this issue to minimize any possible health risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environment, Science and Engineering and Marine Ecology Research Centre Southern Cross University, Lismore, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Fishing and resource use continues to be an essential aspect of life for many Aboriginal communities throughout Australia. It is important for dietary sustenance, and also retains deep social, cultural and economic significance, playing a fundamental role in maintaining group cohesion, transferring cultural knowledge and affirming Indigenous identities. We surveyed approximately 20% of the Gumbaynggirr Aboriginal community of Nambucca Heads, New South Wales, Australia. This paper explores Gumbaynggirr Connection to Country and engagement in cultural practice. It quantifies fishing efforts and consumption of seafood within the community. We found 95% of the sample group fish, with the highest rate of fishing being 2-3 times a week (27%). Furthermore, 98% of participants eat seafood weekly or more frequently, up to more than once a day (24%). Survey results revealed that Myxus elongatus (Sand mullet) and naturally recruited Saccostrea glomerata (Sydney rock oysters) continue to be important wild resources to the Gumbaynggirr community. Trace metals were measured in M. elongatus and S. glomerata samples collected by community participants in this study. Maximum levels prescribed in the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code were not exceeded in the edible tissue for either species, however both species exceeded the generally expected levels for zinc and copper and S. glomerata samples exceeded the generally expected level for selenium. Furthermore the average dietary exposure to trace metals from consuming seafood was calculated for the surveyed population. Trace metal intake was then compared to the provisional tolerable weekly intake prescribed by the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives. This process revealed that copper and selenium intake were both within the provisional tolerable weekly intake, while there is no guideline for zinc. Furthermore, participants relying heavily on wild resources from the Nambucca River estuary may exceed the provisional tolerable weekly intake for cadmium. This suggests the need for further investigation of this issue to minimize any possible health risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus