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Acylation of Antioxidant of Bamboo Leaves with Fatty Acids by Lipase and the Acylated Derivatives' Efficiency in the Inhibition of Acrylamide Formation in Fried Potato Crisps.

Ma X, Wang E, Lu Y, Wang Y, Ou S, Yan R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Both thin layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses confirmed the high efficiency of the isolation process with the purified orientin-6″-laurate, isoorientin-6″-laurate, vitexin-6″-laurate, and isovitexin-6″-laurate that were obtained.The addition of AOB and acylated AOB reduced acrylamide formation in fried potato crisps.Results showed that 0.05% AOB and 0.05% and 0.1% acylated AOB groups significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the content of acrylamide in potato crisps by 30.7%, 44.5%, and 46.9%, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632, China.

ABSTRACT
This study selectively acylated the primary hydroxyl groups on flavonoids in antioxidant of bamboo leaves (AOB) using lauric acid with Candida antarctica lipase B in tert-amyl-alcohol. The separation and isolation of acylated derivatives were performed using silica gel column chromatography with a mixture of dichloromethane/diethyl ether/methanol as eluents. Both thin layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses confirmed the high efficiency of the isolation process with the purified orientin-6″-laurate, isoorientin-6″-laurate, vitexin-6″-laurate, and isovitexin-6″-laurate that were obtained. The addition of AOB and acylated AOB reduced acrylamide formation in fried potato crisps. Results showed that 0.05% AOB and 0.05% and 0.1% acylated AOB groups significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the content of acrylamide in potato crisps by 30.7%, 44.5%, and 46.9%, respectively.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship between acrylamide levels and different conditions of AOB and acylated AOB immersion treatments in potato crisps.Data values are mean ± SD (n = 3). Bars with an asterisk indicate significant difference from the control (p < 0.05).
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pone.0130680.g007: Relationship between acrylamide levels and different conditions of AOB and acylated AOB immersion treatments in potato crisps.Data values are mean ± SD (n = 3). Bars with an asterisk indicate significant difference from the control (p < 0.05).

Mentions: Researchers have studied the effects of plant or fruit extracts containing flavonoids or phenolic compounds on acrylamide formation in model systems and in fried potato crisps with satisfactory results [30,31]. Fig 7 shows the relationships between acrylamide levels and different treatments of potato crisps. The results indicated that acylated AOB was more efficient for inhibiting acrylamide formation in fried potato crisps. Specifically, potato crisps with 0.001%, 0.01%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1% AOB treatments induced 5.8%, 20.2%, 30.7%, 23.6%, 15.4%, and 7.4% inhibition of acrylamide formation, respectively. In contrast, the levels of acrylamide of potato crisps with 0.001%, 0.01%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1% acylated AOB treatments were 8.8%, 26.9%, 36.5%, 44.9%, 20.7%, and 13.9% less than the control group, respectively. Statistical analyses showed that among the treatments, 0.05% AOB, and 0.05% and 0.1% acylated AOB groups significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the content of acrylamide levels in fried potato crisps. The enhanced potency of acylated AOB could be attributed to its higher solubility in a lipidic food system such as fried potato crisps. Acylated AOB may be more accessible to scavenge reactive carbonyls formed in Maillard reactions (which are responsible for the formation of acrylamide in food systems), and this property might result in reduced acrylamide levels [32]. It should be pointed out that results didn’t show significant concentration-dependent relationship in different ranges of treatments or even anti-concentration-dependent relations in high ranges of treatments. This reverse tendency may be attributed to “antioxidative paradox” which had been first reported in 1993 [33] and observed by different researchers since then [34, 35, 36].


Acylation of Antioxidant of Bamboo Leaves with Fatty Acids by Lipase and the Acylated Derivatives' Efficiency in the Inhibition of Acrylamide Formation in Fried Potato Crisps.

Ma X, Wang E, Lu Y, Wang Y, Ou S, Yan R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Relationship between acrylamide levels and different conditions of AOB and acylated AOB immersion treatments in potato crisps.Data values are mean ± SD (n = 3). Bars with an asterisk indicate significant difference from the control (p < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4476655&req=5

pone.0130680.g007: Relationship between acrylamide levels and different conditions of AOB and acylated AOB immersion treatments in potato crisps.Data values are mean ± SD (n = 3). Bars with an asterisk indicate significant difference from the control (p < 0.05).
Mentions: Researchers have studied the effects of plant or fruit extracts containing flavonoids or phenolic compounds on acrylamide formation in model systems and in fried potato crisps with satisfactory results [30,31]. Fig 7 shows the relationships between acrylamide levels and different treatments of potato crisps. The results indicated that acylated AOB was more efficient for inhibiting acrylamide formation in fried potato crisps. Specifically, potato crisps with 0.001%, 0.01%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1% AOB treatments induced 5.8%, 20.2%, 30.7%, 23.6%, 15.4%, and 7.4% inhibition of acrylamide formation, respectively. In contrast, the levels of acrylamide of potato crisps with 0.001%, 0.01%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1% acylated AOB treatments were 8.8%, 26.9%, 36.5%, 44.9%, 20.7%, and 13.9% less than the control group, respectively. Statistical analyses showed that among the treatments, 0.05% AOB, and 0.05% and 0.1% acylated AOB groups significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the content of acrylamide levels in fried potato crisps. The enhanced potency of acylated AOB could be attributed to its higher solubility in a lipidic food system such as fried potato crisps. Acylated AOB may be more accessible to scavenge reactive carbonyls formed in Maillard reactions (which are responsible for the formation of acrylamide in food systems), and this property might result in reduced acrylamide levels [32]. It should be pointed out that results didn’t show significant concentration-dependent relationship in different ranges of treatments or even anti-concentration-dependent relations in high ranges of treatments. This reverse tendency may be attributed to “antioxidative paradox” which had been first reported in 1993 [33] and observed by different researchers since then [34, 35, 36].

Bottom Line: Both thin layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses confirmed the high efficiency of the isolation process with the purified orientin-6″-laurate, isoorientin-6″-laurate, vitexin-6″-laurate, and isovitexin-6″-laurate that were obtained.The addition of AOB and acylated AOB reduced acrylamide formation in fried potato crisps.Results showed that 0.05% AOB and 0.05% and 0.1% acylated AOB groups significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the content of acrylamide in potato crisps by 30.7%, 44.5%, and 46.9%, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science and Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou, 510632, China.

ABSTRACT
This study selectively acylated the primary hydroxyl groups on flavonoids in antioxidant of bamboo leaves (AOB) using lauric acid with Candida antarctica lipase B in tert-amyl-alcohol. The separation and isolation of acylated derivatives were performed using silica gel column chromatography with a mixture of dichloromethane/diethyl ether/methanol as eluents. Both thin layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses confirmed the high efficiency of the isolation process with the purified orientin-6″-laurate, isoorientin-6″-laurate, vitexin-6″-laurate, and isovitexin-6″-laurate that were obtained. The addition of AOB and acylated AOB reduced acrylamide formation in fried potato crisps. Results showed that 0.05% AOB and 0.05% and 0.1% acylated AOB groups significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the content of acrylamide in potato crisps by 30.7%, 44.5%, and 46.9%, respectively.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus