Limits...
Translating Alcohol Research: Opportunities and Challenges.

Batman AM, Miles MF - Alcohol Res (2015)

Bottom Line: This process demands efficient bidirectional communication across basic, applied, and clinical science as well as with clinical practitioners.Moreover, the integration of systems biology approaches with collaborative clinical studies may yield novel insights for future translational success.Finally, appreciation of genetic variation in pharmacological or behavioral treatment responses and optimal communication from bench to bedside and back may strengthen the success of translational research applications to AUD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacology/Toxicology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia; Melior Discovery, Exton, Pennsylvania.

ABSTRACT
Alcohol use disorder (AUD) and its sequelae impose a major burden on the public health of the United States, and adequate long-term control of this disorder has not been achieved. Molecular and behavioral basic science research findings are providing the groundwork for understanding the mechanisms underlying AUD and have identified multiple candidate targets for ongoing clinical trials. However, the translation of basic research or clinical findings into improved therapeutic approaches for AUD must become more efficient. Translational research is a multistage process of stream-lining the movement of basic biomedical research findings into clinical research and then to the clinical target populations. This process demands efficient bidirectional communication across basic, applied, and clinical science as well as with clinical practitioners. Ongoing work suggests rapid progress is being made with an evolving translational framework within the alcohol research field. This is helped by multiple interdisciplinary collaborative research structures that have been developed to advance translational work on AUD. Moreover, the integration of systems biology approaches with collaborative clinical studies may yield novel insights for future translational success. Finally, appreciation of genetic variation in pharmacological or behavioral treatment responses and optimal communication from bench to bedside and back may strengthen the success of translational research applications to AUD.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Translational research pipeline. Diagram portraying the information and discovery flow from basic research (left) via translational research (middle) to final clinical application (right). Vertical lines and arrows indicate negative (upper) and supportive (lower) factors modulating the translational pipeline. This process can be thought of as occurring in five stages, from basic research (T0) and translational research (T1 and T2) to clinical research (T3 and T4).
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4476605&req=5

f1-arcr-37-1-7: Translational research pipeline. Diagram portraying the information and discovery flow from basic research (left) via translational research (middle) to final clinical application (right). Vertical lines and arrows indicate negative (upper) and supportive (lower) factors modulating the translational pipeline. This process can be thought of as occurring in five stages, from basic research (T0) and translational research (T1 and T2) to clinical research (T3 and T4).

Mentions: Basic and clinical research have both been clearly defined over the years, but since Koshland’s statement in 1993, a third domain of translational research has been established that offers a bridge between basic research and clinical applications (see figure 1 and table 1). Paraphrasing National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap definitions, “Translation is the process of turning observations in the laboratory and clinic into interventions that improve the health of individuals and the public—from diagnostics and therapeutics to medical procedures and behavioral changes” (http://www.ncats.nih.gov/about/about.html). Under such a definition, basic scientific inquiry might result from basic research, applied research, or clinical research designs. For example, studies on dopamine receptor regulation in animal models, on the effects of ethanol on dopamine receptor gene expression in animal models, or on correlations of dopamine receptor function with the course of AUD using imaging studies in patients could be interpreted as basic, applied, and clinical research, respectively. However, studies assessing whether a drug or behavioral intervention that modulates dopamine receptor function in animals could alter ethanol consumption or toxicity in humans would clearly be an example of translational research.


Translating Alcohol Research: Opportunities and Challenges.

Batman AM, Miles MF - Alcohol Res (2015)

Translational research pipeline. Diagram portraying the information and discovery flow from basic research (left) via translational research (middle) to final clinical application (right). Vertical lines and arrows indicate negative (upper) and supportive (lower) factors modulating the translational pipeline. This process can be thought of as occurring in five stages, from basic research (T0) and translational research (T1 and T2) to clinical research (T3 and T4).
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4476605&req=5

f1-arcr-37-1-7: Translational research pipeline. Diagram portraying the information and discovery flow from basic research (left) via translational research (middle) to final clinical application (right). Vertical lines and arrows indicate negative (upper) and supportive (lower) factors modulating the translational pipeline. This process can be thought of as occurring in five stages, from basic research (T0) and translational research (T1 and T2) to clinical research (T3 and T4).
Mentions: Basic and clinical research have both been clearly defined over the years, but since Koshland’s statement in 1993, a third domain of translational research has been established that offers a bridge between basic research and clinical applications (see figure 1 and table 1). Paraphrasing National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap definitions, “Translation is the process of turning observations in the laboratory and clinic into interventions that improve the health of individuals and the public—from diagnostics and therapeutics to medical procedures and behavioral changes” (http://www.ncats.nih.gov/about/about.html). Under such a definition, basic scientific inquiry might result from basic research, applied research, or clinical research designs. For example, studies on dopamine receptor regulation in animal models, on the effects of ethanol on dopamine receptor gene expression in animal models, or on correlations of dopamine receptor function with the course of AUD using imaging studies in patients could be interpreted as basic, applied, and clinical research, respectively. However, studies assessing whether a drug or behavioral intervention that modulates dopamine receptor function in animals could alter ethanol consumption or toxicity in humans would clearly be an example of translational research.

Bottom Line: This process demands efficient bidirectional communication across basic, applied, and clinical science as well as with clinical practitioners.Moreover, the integration of systems biology approaches with collaborative clinical studies may yield novel insights for future translational success.Finally, appreciation of genetic variation in pharmacological or behavioral treatment responses and optimal communication from bench to bedside and back may strengthen the success of translational research applications to AUD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacology/Toxicology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia; Melior Discovery, Exton, Pennsylvania.

ABSTRACT
Alcohol use disorder (AUD) and its sequelae impose a major burden on the public health of the United States, and adequate long-term control of this disorder has not been achieved. Molecular and behavioral basic science research findings are providing the groundwork for understanding the mechanisms underlying AUD and have identified multiple candidate targets for ongoing clinical trials. However, the translation of basic research or clinical findings into improved therapeutic approaches for AUD must become more efficient. Translational research is a multistage process of stream-lining the movement of basic biomedical research findings into clinical research and then to the clinical target populations. This process demands efficient bidirectional communication across basic, applied, and clinical science as well as with clinical practitioners. Ongoing work suggests rapid progress is being made with an evolving translational framework within the alcohol research field. This is helped by multiple interdisciplinary collaborative research structures that have been developed to advance translational work on AUD. Moreover, the integration of systems biology approaches with collaborative clinical studies may yield novel insights for future translational success. Finally, appreciation of genetic variation in pharmacological or behavioral treatment responses and optimal communication from bench to bedside and back may strengthen the success of translational research applications to AUD.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus