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Translating Alcohol Research Into Practice

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As Fein and Cardenas explain, it may be possible to treat AUD by altering selective brain network function with focused magnetic stimulation applied transcranially and with the use of neurofeedback... Neuroimaging studies also have identified neuronal changes that may be associated with drinking relapse... In light of the multifactorial nature of AUD, we now know that factors such as stress affect brain circuitry in recovering alcoholics (see the article by Seo and Sinha)... Hence, basic research through animal models of stress is critical for testing the effects of stress surmised from human studies... Excessive alcohol consumption by pregnant women is particularly dangerous to the fetus... The timing of hazardous drinking occurring during fetal development dictates the locus and extent of neural and facial dysmorphology sustained, resulting in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD)... Animal models of FASD have yielded essential information about normal brain development and the temporal and dosage parameters of alcohol exposure that produce significant dysmorphology (see the article by Wang and Kroenke)... Clearly, alcohol researchers have led the way in applying these methods to identify—in the living brain—neural changes that occur with chronic, hazardous substance use... This accommodation of brain structure and function to the chronic presence of alcohol, that is neuroadaptation, seems to be either reversible or at least reduced with sustained sobriety... Knowledge about bidirectional neuroadaptation also might lead to the development of medications based on neural circuitry that expresses neuroplasticity (see the article by Johnson and Oslin) and identification of individuals with AUD who are treatment candidates because of their adequate neuroadaptive reserve... By fostering innovative collaborations across government, academia, industry, and the people we strive to treat, we can make the most of translational research findings and meet the growing need for specialized treatment (see the article by Batman and Miles)... Research designs with both basic and clinical translational components hold promise for preventing and treating AUD and sustaining sobriety.

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Translating Alcohol Research Into Practice
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4476597&req=5

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

As Fein and Cardenas explain, it may be possible to treat AUD by altering selective brain network function with focused magnetic stimulation applied transcranially and with the use of neurofeedback... Neuroimaging studies also have identified neuronal changes that may be associated with drinking relapse... In light of the multifactorial nature of AUD, we now know that factors such as stress affect brain circuitry in recovering alcoholics (see the article by Seo and Sinha)... Hence, basic research through animal models of stress is critical for testing the effects of stress surmised from human studies... Excessive alcohol consumption by pregnant women is particularly dangerous to the fetus... The timing of hazardous drinking occurring during fetal development dictates the locus and extent of neural and facial dysmorphology sustained, resulting in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD)... Animal models of FASD have yielded essential information about normal brain development and the temporal and dosage parameters of alcohol exposure that produce significant dysmorphology (see the article by Wang and Kroenke)... Clearly, alcohol researchers have led the way in applying these methods to identify—in the living brain—neural changes that occur with chronic, hazardous substance use... This accommodation of brain structure and function to the chronic presence of alcohol, that is neuroadaptation, seems to be either reversible or at least reduced with sustained sobriety... Knowledge about bidirectional neuroadaptation also might lead to the development of medications based on neural circuitry that expresses neuroplasticity (see the article by Johnson and Oslin) and identification of individuals with AUD who are treatment candidates because of their adequate neuroadaptive reserve... By fostering innovative collaborations across government, academia, industry, and the people we strive to treat, we can make the most of translational research findings and meet the growing need for specialized treatment (see the article by Batman and Miles)... Research designs with both basic and clinical translational components hold promise for preventing and treating AUD and sustaining sobriety.

No MeSH data available.