Limits...
Associations between Dietary Antioxidant Intake and Metabolic Syndrome.

Wei J, Zeng C, Gong QY, Li XX, Lei GH, Yang TB - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The lowest quartile of antioxidant intake was regarded as the reference category.However, there was no significant relationship between dietary carotenoid and vitamin E intake and MS.Dietary carotenoid and vitamin E intake was not associated with MS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan Province, China, 410008.

ABSTRACT

Background: The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between dietary antioxidant intake (carotenoid, vitamin C, E and selenium) intake and metabolic syndrome (MS).

Method: This cross-sectional study included 2069 subjects undergoing a regular health checkup. Biochemical test results and data on dietary intakes were collected for analysis. Adjustment for energy intake and multi-variable logistic regression were performed to determine adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for the relationship between dietary antioxidants intake and MS. The lowest quartile of antioxidant intake was regarded as the reference category.

Result: Dietary vitamin C intake (P values for trend were 0.02 in energy adjusted analysis and 0.08 in multivariable adjusted analysis) had a negative association with MS, as did selenium intake in the second quartile (energy adjusted OR: 0.60, 95%CI: 0.43 to 0.85; multivariable adjusted OR: 0.60, 95%CI: 0.43 to 0.86). However, there was no significant relationship between dietary carotenoid and vitamin E intake and MS.

Conclusion: Subjects with low intake of vitamin C might be predisposed to development of MS, while dietary selenium intake had a moderate negative association with MS. Dietary carotenoid and vitamin E intake was not associated with MS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Adjusted OR and related 95% CI of dietary antioxidants intake (expressed as quartiles, Q2, Q3, Q4 vs. Q1) and elevated serum triglycerides.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4476578&req=5

pone.0130876.g002: Adjusted OR and related 95% CI of dietary antioxidants intake (expressed as quartiles, Q2, Q3, Q4 vs. Q1) and elevated serum triglycerides.

Mentions: We also examined the associations between dietary antioxidant intake and MS features, including enlarged waist circumference (Fig 1), elevated serum triglycerides (Fig 2), decreased serum HDL cholesterol (Fig 3), elevated SBP (Fig 4), elevated DBP (Fig 5) and elevated fasting glucose (Fig 6). Both vitamin C and selenium intake showed a negative correlation with waist circumference (P values for trend: in both = 0.05). Selenium intake had a negative association with high DBP (P for trend = 0.04) and was also negatively correlated with hyperglycemia (OR = 0.67, 95%CI: 0.51 to 0.89, P = 0.01) in the second quartile compared with the reference quartile. Associations between dietary antioxidant and the other features of MS were absent in the multivariable logistic regression analysis.


Associations between Dietary Antioxidant Intake and Metabolic Syndrome.

Wei J, Zeng C, Gong QY, Li XX, Lei GH, Yang TB - PLoS ONE (2015)

Adjusted OR and related 95% CI of dietary antioxidants intake (expressed as quartiles, Q2, Q3, Q4 vs. Q1) and elevated serum triglycerides.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4476578&req=5

pone.0130876.g002: Adjusted OR and related 95% CI of dietary antioxidants intake (expressed as quartiles, Q2, Q3, Q4 vs. Q1) and elevated serum triglycerides.
Mentions: We also examined the associations between dietary antioxidant intake and MS features, including enlarged waist circumference (Fig 1), elevated serum triglycerides (Fig 2), decreased serum HDL cholesterol (Fig 3), elevated SBP (Fig 4), elevated DBP (Fig 5) and elevated fasting glucose (Fig 6). Both vitamin C and selenium intake showed a negative correlation with waist circumference (P values for trend: in both = 0.05). Selenium intake had a negative association with high DBP (P for trend = 0.04) and was also negatively correlated with hyperglycemia (OR = 0.67, 95%CI: 0.51 to 0.89, P = 0.01) in the second quartile compared with the reference quartile. Associations between dietary antioxidant and the other features of MS were absent in the multivariable logistic regression analysis.

Bottom Line: The lowest quartile of antioxidant intake was regarded as the reference category.However, there was no significant relationship between dietary carotenoid and vitamin E intake and MS.Dietary carotenoid and vitamin E intake was not associated with MS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan Province, China, 410008.

ABSTRACT

Background: The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between dietary antioxidant intake (carotenoid, vitamin C, E and selenium) intake and metabolic syndrome (MS).

Method: This cross-sectional study included 2069 subjects undergoing a regular health checkup. Biochemical test results and data on dietary intakes were collected for analysis. Adjustment for energy intake and multi-variable logistic regression were performed to determine adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for the relationship between dietary antioxidants intake and MS. The lowest quartile of antioxidant intake was regarded as the reference category.

Result: Dietary vitamin C intake (P values for trend were 0.02 in energy adjusted analysis and 0.08 in multivariable adjusted analysis) had a negative association with MS, as did selenium intake in the second quartile (energy adjusted OR: 0.60, 95%CI: 0.43 to 0.85; multivariable adjusted OR: 0.60, 95%CI: 0.43 to 0.86). However, there was no significant relationship between dietary carotenoid and vitamin E intake and MS.

Conclusion: Subjects with low intake of vitamin C might be predisposed to development of MS, while dietary selenium intake had a moderate negative association with MS. Dietary carotenoid and vitamin E intake was not associated with MS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus