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Steeling Ourselves: Intragroup Communication while Anticipating Intergroup Contact Evokes Defensive Intergroup Perceptions.

Greijdanus H, Postmes T, Gordijn EH, van Zomeren M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Experiment 1 examined the effects of intragroup communication (vs. individual thought) and anticipated face-to-face intergroup contact (vs. no anticipated face-to-face intergroup contact).Together, these results support the idea that steeling is a defensive reaction to prepare for an anxiety-arousing intergroup confrontation.Although steeling is also associated with positive consequences such as increased ingroup solidarity and social creativity, this hardened stance may be an obstacle to conflict de-escalation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Social Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Two experiments investigated the role of intragroup communication in intergroup conflict (de-)escalation. Experiment 1 examined the effects of intragroup communication (vs. individual thought) and anticipated face-to-face intergroup contact (vs. no anticipated face-to-face intergroup contact). The group discussions of stigmatized group members who anticipated face-to-face intergroup contact revolved more around intergroup hostility. This boosted ingroup identification and increased social creativity but also led to steeling (a hardening of perceived intergroup relations). In Experiment 2, new participants listened to the taped group discussions. The discussions of groups anticipating face-to-face intergroup contact evoked more intergroup anxiety-related discomfort than discussions of groups not anticipating face-to-face intergroup encounters. Together, these results support the idea that steeling is a defensive reaction to prepare for an anxiety-arousing intergroup confrontation. Although steeling is also associated with positive consequences such as increased ingroup solidarity and social creativity, this hardened stance may be an obstacle to conflict de-escalation.

No MeSH data available.


Effects of intragroup communication and anticipated face-to-face intergroup contact on ingroup’s attitude towards the outgroup.Error bars represent 95% confidence intervals, scale ranged from -3 (negative) to 3 (positive). Intragroup communication while anticipating face-to-face intergroup contact (contrasted to the other three conditions) leads to more negative perceptions of the ingroup’s attitude towards the outgroup.
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pone.0131049.g001: Effects of intragroup communication and anticipated face-to-face intergroup contact on ingroup’s attitude towards the outgroup.Error bars represent 95% confidence intervals, scale ranged from -3 (negative) to 3 (positive). Intragroup communication while anticipating face-to-face intergroup contact (contrasted to the other three conditions) leads to more negative perceptions of the ingroup’s attitude towards the outgroup.

Mentions: Fig 1 shows the effects on the ingroup’s attitude towards the outgroup. Results support the hypothesis that when intergroup contact is anticipated, the opportunity for intergroup communication leads to more negative perceptions, compared with the other conditions, γ = -1.05 (SD = 1.86), t(50) = -3.66, p = .001. This γ coefficient means that, controlling for the effects of the other contrasts and the multilevel structure of the data, participants who engaged in intragroup communication while anticipating intergroup contact perceived their ingroup’s attitude towards the outgroup, on average, 1.05 points lower on a 7-point scale than participants in the remaining three conditions. As expected, the control contrasts were non-significant, ps > .34. In line with the nature of the current intergroup conflict, participants’ average rating of the ingroup’s attitude towards the outgroup overall did not significantly differ from zero (i.e., neither positive nor negative), overall intercept = 0.17, t(53) = 1.33, p = .19.


Steeling Ourselves: Intragroup Communication while Anticipating Intergroup Contact Evokes Defensive Intergroup Perceptions.

Greijdanus H, Postmes T, Gordijn EH, van Zomeren M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Effects of intragroup communication and anticipated face-to-face intergroup contact on ingroup’s attitude towards the outgroup.Error bars represent 95% confidence intervals, scale ranged from -3 (negative) to 3 (positive). Intragroup communication while anticipating face-to-face intergroup contact (contrasted to the other three conditions) leads to more negative perceptions of the ingroup’s attitude towards the outgroup.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4476566&req=5

pone.0131049.g001: Effects of intragroup communication and anticipated face-to-face intergroup contact on ingroup’s attitude towards the outgroup.Error bars represent 95% confidence intervals, scale ranged from -3 (negative) to 3 (positive). Intragroup communication while anticipating face-to-face intergroup contact (contrasted to the other three conditions) leads to more negative perceptions of the ingroup’s attitude towards the outgroup.
Mentions: Fig 1 shows the effects on the ingroup’s attitude towards the outgroup. Results support the hypothesis that when intergroup contact is anticipated, the opportunity for intergroup communication leads to more negative perceptions, compared with the other conditions, γ = -1.05 (SD = 1.86), t(50) = -3.66, p = .001. This γ coefficient means that, controlling for the effects of the other contrasts and the multilevel structure of the data, participants who engaged in intragroup communication while anticipating intergroup contact perceived their ingroup’s attitude towards the outgroup, on average, 1.05 points lower on a 7-point scale than participants in the remaining three conditions. As expected, the control contrasts were non-significant, ps > .34. In line with the nature of the current intergroup conflict, participants’ average rating of the ingroup’s attitude towards the outgroup overall did not significantly differ from zero (i.e., neither positive nor negative), overall intercept = 0.17, t(53) = 1.33, p = .19.

Bottom Line: Experiment 1 examined the effects of intragroup communication (vs. individual thought) and anticipated face-to-face intergroup contact (vs. no anticipated face-to-face intergroup contact).Together, these results support the idea that steeling is a defensive reaction to prepare for an anxiety-arousing intergroup confrontation.Although steeling is also associated with positive consequences such as increased ingroup solidarity and social creativity, this hardened stance may be an obstacle to conflict de-escalation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Social Psychology, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Two experiments investigated the role of intragroup communication in intergroup conflict (de-)escalation. Experiment 1 examined the effects of intragroup communication (vs. individual thought) and anticipated face-to-face intergroup contact (vs. no anticipated face-to-face intergroup contact). The group discussions of stigmatized group members who anticipated face-to-face intergroup contact revolved more around intergroup hostility. This boosted ingroup identification and increased social creativity but also led to steeling (a hardening of perceived intergroup relations). In Experiment 2, new participants listened to the taped group discussions. The discussions of groups anticipating face-to-face intergroup contact evoked more intergroup anxiety-related discomfort than discussions of groups not anticipating face-to-face intergroup encounters. Together, these results support the idea that steeling is a defensive reaction to prepare for an anxiety-arousing intergroup confrontation. Although steeling is also associated with positive consequences such as increased ingroup solidarity and social creativity, this hardened stance may be an obstacle to conflict de-escalation.

No MeSH data available.