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Short-Term Estrogen Replacement Effects on Insulin Sensitivity and Glucose Tolerance in At-Risk Cats for Feline Diabetes Mellitus.

Wara A, Hunsucker S, Bove K, Backus R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Over the 14 days, E2 compared to Vh treatment reduced (p=0.03) food intake (- 22%) but not enough to significantly reduce body weight; activity counts were not significantly changed.With E2 compared to Vh treatment, the late-phase plasma insulin response of the glucose tolerance test was less (p=0.03) by 31%, while glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity indexes were not significantly changed.Further investigation is needed to identify the mechanism underlying the E2 effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, University of Missouri, College of Veterinary Medicine, Columbia, Missouri, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Male domestic cats that are neutered and overweight are at an increased risk for developing a type-2-like diabetes mellitus. Beneficial effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) on glucose homeostasis may be lost with neutering and thereby account for increased diabetes risk. To evaluate this, adult male neutered overweight cats (n=6) were given daily E2 (1.0 μg/kg) or vehicle (Vh; ethanol, 1.0 μL/kg) in a single crossover trial of 14-day periods with a 7-day washout. The E2 and Vh were voluntarily ingested on food. The E2 dosage was determined in a pre-trial to significantly and transiently reduce food intake with no measurable change in plasma E2 concentration. During treatments, physical activity was assessed with collar-mounted accelerometers on days 9-11, and tests of intravenous insulin tolerance and intravenous glucose tolerance were conducted on days 13 and 14, respectively. Over the 14 days, E2 compared to Vh treatment reduced (p=0.03) food intake (- 22%) but not enough to significantly reduce body weight; activity counts were not significantly changed. With E2 compared to Vh treatment, the late-phase plasma insulin response of the glucose tolerance test was less (p=0.03) by 31%, while glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity indexes were not significantly changed. The results indicate that oral E2 at a dosage that moderately affects food intake may reduce insulin requirement for achieving glucose homeostasis in neutered male cats. Further investigation is needed to identify the mechanism underlying the E2 effect.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Box-whisker plots of plasma glucose concentrations (mmol/L) of the IVGTTs of adult, overweight (>25% body fat) male, neutered cats (n = 6) when given vehicle (open boxes) and 1.0 μg/kg E2 (shaded boxes).Boxes represent the 25 to 75th percentile, central lines represent medians, and whiskers show minimum and maximum observations.
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pone.0130696.g005: Box-whisker plots of plasma glucose concentrations (mmol/L) of the IVGTTs of adult, overweight (>25% body fat) male, neutered cats (n = 6) when given vehicle (open boxes) and 1.0 μg/kg E2 (shaded boxes).Boxes represent the 25 to 75th percentile, central lines represent medians, and whiskers show minimum and maximum observations.

Mentions: Plasma glucose concentrations were not statistically different after E2 treatment at any sampling time of the IVGTT (Fig 5). The plasma insulin AUC concentration during the first 15 min, i. e., the early-phase insulin response (AUC 0–15 min), did not significantly change with E2 treatment (Table 4). However, during the last hour, i. e., the late-phase insulin response (AUC 60–120 min), plasma insulin concentration decreased (p = 0.03) (31%) with E2 treatment (Fig 6). With increasing body weight, the AUC 60–120 min increased (ρ = -0.89, p = 0.02) during Vh treatment. However, a significant relationship between body weight and AUC 60–120 min was not found during E2 treatment (p = 0.15).


Short-Term Estrogen Replacement Effects on Insulin Sensitivity and Glucose Tolerance in At-Risk Cats for Feline Diabetes Mellitus.

Wara A, Hunsucker S, Bove K, Backus R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Box-whisker plots of plasma glucose concentrations (mmol/L) of the IVGTTs of adult, overweight (>25% body fat) male, neutered cats (n = 6) when given vehicle (open boxes) and 1.0 μg/kg E2 (shaded boxes).Boxes represent the 25 to 75th percentile, central lines represent medians, and whiskers show minimum and maximum observations.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4472694&req=5

pone.0130696.g005: Box-whisker plots of plasma glucose concentrations (mmol/L) of the IVGTTs of adult, overweight (>25% body fat) male, neutered cats (n = 6) when given vehicle (open boxes) and 1.0 μg/kg E2 (shaded boxes).Boxes represent the 25 to 75th percentile, central lines represent medians, and whiskers show minimum and maximum observations.
Mentions: Plasma glucose concentrations were not statistically different after E2 treatment at any sampling time of the IVGTT (Fig 5). The plasma insulin AUC concentration during the first 15 min, i. e., the early-phase insulin response (AUC 0–15 min), did not significantly change with E2 treatment (Table 4). However, during the last hour, i. e., the late-phase insulin response (AUC 60–120 min), plasma insulin concentration decreased (p = 0.03) (31%) with E2 treatment (Fig 6). With increasing body weight, the AUC 60–120 min increased (ρ = -0.89, p = 0.02) during Vh treatment. However, a significant relationship between body weight and AUC 60–120 min was not found during E2 treatment (p = 0.15).

Bottom Line: Over the 14 days, E2 compared to Vh treatment reduced (p=0.03) food intake (- 22%) but not enough to significantly reduce body weight; activity counts were not significantly changed.With E2 compared to Vh treatment, the late-phase plasma insulin response of the glucose tolerance test was less (p=0.03) by 31%, while glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity indexes were not significantly changed.Further investigation is needed to identify the mechanism underlying the E2 effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, University of Missouri, College of Veterinary Medicine, Columbia, Missouri, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Male domestic cats that are neutered and overweight are at an increased risk for developing a type-2-like diabetes mellitus. Beneficial effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) on glucose homeostasis may be lost with neutering and thereby account for increased diabetes risk. To evaluate this, adult male neutered overweight cats (n=6) were given daily E2 (1.0 μg/kg) or vehicle (Vh; ethanol, 1.0 μL/kg) in a single crossover trial of 14-day periods with a 7-day washout. The E2 and Vh were voluntarily ingested on food. The E2 dosage was determined in a pre-trial to significantly and transiently reduce food intake with no measurable change in plasma E2 concentration. During treatments, physical activity was assessed with collar-mounted accelerometers on days 9-11, and tests of intravenous insulin tolerance and intravenous glucose tolerance were conducted on days 13 and 14, respectively. Over the 14 days, E2 compared to Vh treatment reduced (p=0.03) food intake (- 22%) but not enough to significantly reduce body weight; activity counts were not significantly changed. With E2 compared to Vh treatment, the late-phase plasma insulin response of the glucose tolerance test was less (p=0.03) by 31%, while glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity indexes were not significantly changed. The results indicate that oral E2 at a dosage that moderately affects food intake may reduce insulin requirement for achieving glucose homeostasis in neutered male cats. Further investigation is needed to identify the mechanism underlying the E2 effect.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus