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Percutaneous Mechanical Ventricular Support in Acute Cardiac Care: A UK Quaternary Centre Experience Using 2.5L, 3.8L and 5.0L Impella Catheters.

Venugopal V, Spiro J, Zaphiriou A, Khan S, Townend JN, Ludman PF, Doshi SN - Cardiol Ther (2014)

Bottom Line: We examined the indications and outcomes from our single-centre "real-world" registry at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK, using all three pump sizes.The 2.5L and 3.8L devices were used in 36 (75%) and 11 (23%) patients, respectively, while one patient (2%) had the 5L device.In this large real-world registry, we have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of the Impella device for a wide range of indications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Mindelsohn Way, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TH, UK, drvinod@doctors.org.uk.

ABSTRACT

Aims: The Impella is a percutaneous ventricular assist device. The majority of published data describes the 2.5L and 5.0L devices, and little data is available for the newer 3.8L device. We examined the indications and outcomes from our single-centre "real-world" registry at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK, using all three pump sizes.

Methods and results: Records from all patients who underwent attempted Impella-assisted procedures at our centre were examined retrospectively. Impella implantation was attempted in 49 patients (mean age 72 ± 13 years; 80% male) and was successful in 48 (98%). 45 patients underwent high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), one patient underwent balloon aortic valvuloplasty and 3 patients had Impella as a bridge to cardiac transplantation. The 2.5L and 3.8L devices were used in 36 (75%) and 11 (23%) patients, respectively, while one patient (2%) had the 5L device. Vascular complications occurred in only one patient (2%) and stroke and peri-procedural myocardial infarction occurred in one patient (2%), while in-hospital mortality was 20% (10/49).

Conclusions: In this large real-world registry, we have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of the Impella device for a wide range of indications. This includes the first series of the 3.8L device which provides superior support with no increase in vascular complications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan–Meier Curve showing survival over a median follow-up period of 29 months (range 1–71)
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Fig1: Kaplan–Meier Curve showing survival over a median follow-up period of 29 months (range 1–71)

Mentions: Within the group of patients studied, 30-day survival was 80% (39/49), while overall survival after a median follow-up of 29 months (range 1–71 months) was 65% (32/49), as shown in Fig. 1.Fig. 1


Percutaneous Mechanical Ventricular Support in Acute Cardiac Care: A UK Quaternary Centre Experience Using 2.5L, 3.8L and 5.0L Impella Catheters.

Venugopal V, Spiro J, Zaphiriou A, Khan S, Townend JN, Ludman PF, Doshi SN - Cardiol Ther (2014)

Kaplan–Meier Curve showing survival over a median follow-up period of 29 months (range 1–71)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4472647&req=5

Fig1: Kaplan–Meier Curve showing survival over a median follow-up period of 29 months (range 1–71)
Mentions: Within the group of patients studied, 30-day survival was 80% (39/49), while overall survival after a median follow-up of 29 months (range 1–71 months) was 65% (32/49), as shown in Fig. 1.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: We examined the indications and outcomes from our single-centre "real-world" registry at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK, using all three pump sizes.The 2.5L and 3.8L devices were used in 36 (75%) and 11 (23%) patients, respectively, while one patient (2%) had the 5L device.In this large real-world registry, we have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of the Impella device for a wide range of indications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Mindelsohn Way, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TH, UK, drvinod@doctors.org.uk.

ABSTRACT

Aims: The Impella is a percutaneous ventricular assist device. The majority of published data describes the 2.5L and 5.0L devices, and little data is available for the newer 3.8L device. We examined the indications and outcomes from our single-centre "real-world" registry at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK, using all three pump sizes.

Methods and results: Records from all patients who underwent attempted Impella-assisted procedures at our centre were examined retrospectively. Impella implantation was attempted in 49 patients (mean age 72 ± 13 years; 80% male) and was successful in 48 (98%). 45 patients underwent high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), one patient underwent balloon aortic valvuloplasty and 3 patients had Impella as a bridge to cardiac transplantation. The 2.5L and 3.8L devices were used in 36 (75%) and 11 (23%) patients, respectively, while one patient (2%) had the 5L device. Vascular complications occurred in only one patient (2%) and stroke and peri-procedural myocardial infarction occurred in one patient (2%), while in-hospital mortality was 20% (10/49).

Conclusions: In this large real-world registry, we have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of the Impella device for a wide range of indications. This includes the first series of the 3.8L device which provides superior support with no increase in vascular complications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus