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Dutch General Practitioners' weight management policy for overweight and obese patients.

Kloek CJ, Tol J, Veenhof C, van der Wulp I, Swinkels IC - BMC Obes (2014)

Bottom Line: GPs with a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) were less likely to refer obese patients.In addition, GPs who had frequent contact with a dietitian were more likely to refer obese patients.Strengthening interdisciplinary collaboration between GPs and dietitians could increase the referral percentage for dietary treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NIVEL Utrecht, PO Box 1568, 3500 BN Utrecht, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: General practitioners (GPs) can play an important role in both the prevention and management of overweight and obesity. Current general practice guidelines in the Netherlands allow room for GPs to execute their own weight management policy.

Objective: To examine GPs' current weight management policy and the factors associated with this policy.

Methods: 800 Dutch GPs were asked to complete a questionnaire in December 2012. The questionnaire items were based on the Dutch Obesity Standard for GPs. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression analyses in 2013.

Results: In total, 307 GPs (39.0%) responded. Most respondents (82.9%) considered weight management as part of their responsibility for providing care. GPs aged <48 years discussed weight less frequent. Next, weight is less frequently discussed with patients without weight-related comorbidities or with moderately overweight patients compared to obese patients. On average, 47.7% of the GPs reported to refer obese patients to a weight management professional, preferably a dietitian (98.3%). GPs with a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) were less likely to refer obese patients. In addition, GPs who had frequent contact with a dietitian were more likely to refer obese patients.

Conclusions: In the context of General Practice and preventive medicine, GPs' discussion of weight and the variety of obesity-determinants with their moderately overweight patients deserves more attention, especially from younger GPs. Strengthening interdisciplinary collaboration between GPs and dietitians could increase the referral percentage for dietary treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

GPs’ vision about weight management as part of GP care.
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Fig1: GPs’ vision about weight management as part of GP care.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows GPs’ perception about overweight and obesity management. Most respondents (82.9%) agreed that promoting a healthy weight is an important part of GP care. Likewise, a majority (90.8%) agreed that GPs should educate patients with obesity about potential health risks. A smaller percentage (53.8%) agreed that GPs should discuss weight, even if the obese patient has another reason for the consultation. Figure 2 shows GPs’ reported frequency of discussing weight for different stages of overweight and obesity. GPs were less likely to discuss weight with patients who had lower BMI and/or no weight-related health risks.Figure 1


Dutch General Practitioners' weight management policy for overweight and obese patients.

Kloek CJ, Tol J, Veenhof C, van der Wulp I, Swinkels IC - BMC Obes (2014)

GPs’ vision about weight management as part of GP care.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4472618&req=5

Fig1: GPs’ vision about weight management as part of GP care.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows GPs’ perception about overweight and obesity management. Most respondents (82.9%) agreed that promoting a healthy weight is an important part of GP care. Likewise, a majority (90.8%) agreed that GPs should educate patients with obesity about potential health risks. A smaller percentage (53.8%) agreed that GPs should discuss weight, even if the obese patient has another reason for the consultation. Figure 2 shows GPs’ reported frequency of discussing weight for different stages of overweight and obesity. GPs were less likely to discuss weight with patients who had lower BMI and/or no weight-related health risks.Figure 1

Bottom Line: GPs with a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) were less likely to refer obese patients.In addition, GPs who had frequent contact with a dietitian were more likely to refer obese patients.Strengthening interdisciplinary collaboration between GPs and dietitians could increase the referral percentage for dietary treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NIVEL Utrecht, PO Box 1568, 3500 BN Utrecht, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: General practitioners (GPs) can play an important role in both the prevention and management of overweight and obesity. Current general practice guidelines in the Netherlands allow room for GPs to execute their own weight management policy.

Objective: To examine GPs' current weight management policy and the factors associated with this policy.

Methods: 800 Dutch GPs were asked to complete a questionnaire in December 2012. The questionnaire items were based on the Dutch Obesity Standard for GPs. The data were analyzed by means of descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression analyses in 2013.

Results: In total, 307 GPs (39.0%) responded. Most respondents (82.9%) considered weight management as part of their responsibility for providing care. GPs aged <48 years discussed weight less frequent. Next, weight is less frequently discussed with patients without weight-related comorbidities or with moderately overweight patients compared to obese patients. On average, 47.7% of the GPs reported to refer obese patients to a weight management professional, preferably a dietitian (98.3%). GPs with a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) were less likely to refer obese patients. In addition, GPs who had frequent contact with a dietitian were more likely to refer obese patients.

Conclusions: In the context of General Practice and preventive medicine, GPs' discussion of weight and the variety of obesity-determinants with their moderately overweight patients deserves more attention, especially from younger GPs. Strengthening interdisciplinary collaboration between GPs and dietitians could increase the referral percentage for dietary treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus