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The correlation between postural control and upper limb position sense in people with chronic ankle instability.

Springer S, Gottlieb U, Moran U, Verhovsky G, Yanovich R - J Foot Ankle Res (2015)

Bottom Line: In the control group, significant correlations were found between the OSI score of the right and left ankles (r = 0.887, p < 0.001), between the AES of the right and left shoulders (r = 0.656, p = 0.011), as well as between the OSI score and the AES of the non-preferred side (r = 0.649, p = 0.012).In the CAI group, significant correlation was found only between the OSI score at both ankles (r = 0.6, p = 0.002).Clinicians can use this information and employ activities that focus on coordinating the upper and lower extremities when designing neuromuscular control training programs for people with CAI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, Ariel University, Ariel, Israel.

ABSTRACT

Background: Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is attributed to functional instability driven by insufficient proprioception. However, it is not clear whether the deficits are related to global impaired performance or to specific decrease in ankle motor-control. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between lower limb postural control and upper limb position sense among people with CAI, in order to further explore the function of the central neural control in people with CAI.

Methods: Fourteen participants (10 males, 4 females) with self-reported CAI and 14 age- and gender-matched, healthy controls participated in this study. Each participant completed single-limb stance postural control tests and shoulder position sense tests. The Overall Stability Index (OSI) was used as a measure of postural stability. The average of the absolute error score (AES) was calculated as a measure of shoulder position sense. Pearson correlations between the scores of the four body sites -lower limb postural stability (preferred/non-preferred), shoulder (preferred/non-preferred) were determined separately for each group.

Results: In the control group, significant correlations were found between the OSI score of the right and left ankles (r = 0.887, p < 0.001), between the AES of the right and left shoulders (r = 0.656, p = 0.011), as well as between the OSI score and the AES of the non-preferred side (r = 0.649, p = 0.012). In the CAI group, significant correlation was found only between the OSI score at both ankles (r = 0.6, p = 0.002).

Conclusions: Individuals with CAI demonstrated lower limb postural control and upper limb position sense similar to those shown in healthy controls. However, correlations between the lower and upper limbs were observed only in the healthy controls. Clinicians can use this information and employ activities that focus on coordinating the upper and lower extremities when designing neuromuscular control training programs for people with CAI.

No MeSH data available.


Shoulder position sense testing. Note. Participants were secured into the seat of the Biodex Multi-Joint System and then the shoulder was positioned at 90° of abduction and 90° of external rotation in the plane of the scapula, with the forearm perpendicular to the floor. Participants were asked to actively reproduce the passively set index angle
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Fig2: Shoulder position sense testing. Note. Participants were secured into the seat of the Biodex Multi-Joint System and then the shoulder was positioned at 90° of abduction and 90° of external rotation in the plane of the scapula, with the forearm perpendicular to the floor. Participants were asked to actively reproduce the passively set index angle

Mentions: The shoulder was chosen for measuring of upper extremity joint position sense, since, similar to the ankle, motor control plays a significant role in ensuring the joint stability [25]. The Biodex Multi-Joint System (Biodex Corp, NY, USA) was used for the position sense test of the shoulder. The system includes an electro-goniometer, which is sensitive to 1° increments [26]. Active angle repositioning was measured with the participants in a seated position, with their back vertical, the shoulder positioned at 90° of abduction and 90° of external rotation in the plane of the scapula (30° in front of the frontal plane), and the forearm perpendicular to the floor (90° of flexion at the elbow) (Fig. 2). This position was selected to simulate the abducted, externally rotated position of the shoulder required in many activities. Participants were blindfolded to eliminate visual cues related to joint position.Fig. 2


The correlation between postural control and upper limb position sense in people with chronic ankle instability.

Springer S, Gottlieb U, Moran U, Verhovsky G, Yanovich R - J Foot Ankle Res (2015)

Shoulder position sense testing. Note. Participants were secured into the seat of the Biodex Multi-Joint System and then the shoulder was positioned at 90° of abduction and 90° of external rotation in the plane of the scapula, with the forearm perpendicular to the floor. Participants were asked to actively reproduce the passively set index angle
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4472401&req=5

Fig2: Shoulder position sense testing. Note. Participants were secured into the seat of the Biodex Multi-Joint System and then the shoulder was positioned at 90° of abduction and 90° of external rotation in the plane of the scapula, with the forearm perpendicular to the floor. Participants were asked to actively reproduce the passively set index angle
Mentions: The shoulder was chosen for measuring of upper extremity joint position sense, since, similar to the ankle, motor control plays a significant role in ensuring the joint stability [25]. The Biodex Multi-Joint System (Biodex Corp, NY, USA) was used for the position sense test of the shoulder. The system includes an electro-goniometer, which is sensitive to 1° increments [26]. Active angle repositioning was measured with the participants in a seated position, with their back vertical, the shoulder positioned at 90° of abduction and 90° of external rotation in the plane of the scapula (30° in front of the frontal plane), and the forearm perpendicular to the floor (90° of flexion at the elbow) (Fig. 2). This position was selected to simulate the abducted, externally rotated position of the shoulder required in many activities. Participants were blindfolded to eliminate visual cues related to joint position.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: In the control group, significant correlations were found between the OSI score of the right and left ankles (r = 0.887, p < 0.001), between the AES of the right and left shoulders (r = 0.656, p = 0.011), as well as between the OSI score and the AES of the non-preferred side (r = 0.649, p = 0.012).In the CAI group, significant correlation was found only between the OSI score at both ankles (r = 0.6, p = 0.002).Clinicians can use this information and employ activities that focus on coordinating the upper and lower extremities when designing neuromuscular control training programs for people with CAI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physical Therapy, Ariel University, Ariel, Israel.

ABSTRACT

Background: Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is attributed to functional instability driven by insufficient proprioception. However, it is not clear whether the deficits are related to global impaired performance or to specific decrease in ankle motor-control. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between lower limb postural control and upper limb position sense among people with CAI, in order to further explore the function of the central neural control in people with CAI.

Methods: Fourteen participants (10 males, 4 females) with self-reported CAI and 14 age- and gender-matched, healthy controls participated in this study. Each participant completed single-limb stance postural control tests and shoulder position sense tests. The Overall Stability Index (OSI) was used as a measure of postural stability. The average of the absolute error score (AES) was calculated as a measure of shoulder position sense. Pearson correlations between the scores of the four body sites -lower limb postural stability (preferred/non-preferred), shoulder (preferred/non-preferred) were determined separately for each group.

Results: In the control group, significant correlations were found between the OSI score of the right and left ankles (r = 0.887, p < 0.001), between the AES of the right and left shoulders (r = 0.656, p = 0.011), as well as between the OSI score and the AES of the non-preferred side (r = 0.649, p = 0.012). In the CAI group, significant correlation was found only between the OSI score at both ankles (r = 0.6, p = 0.002).

Conclusions: Individuals with CAI demonstrated lower limb postural control and upper limb position sense similar to those shown in healthy controls. However, correlations between the lower and upper limbs were observed only in the healthy controls. Clinicians can use this information and employ activities that focus on coordinating the upper and lower extremities when designing neuromuscular control training programs for people with CAI.

No MeSH data available.