Limits...
Pathology in Captive Wild Felids at German Zoological Gardens.

Junginger J, Hansmann F, Herder V, Lehmbecker A, Peters M, Beyerbach M, Wohlsein P, Baumgärtner W - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: One tiger exhibited degenerative white matter changes consistent with an entity termed large felid leukoencephalomyelopathy.Various hyperplastic, degenerative and inflammatory changes with minor clinical significance were found in several organs.Summarized, renal lesions followed by neoplastic changes as well as inflammatory changes in lung and gastrointestinal tract represent the most frequent findings in captive wild felids living in German zoological gardens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Lower Saxony, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This retrospective study provides an overview on spontaneous diseases occurring in 38 captive wild felids submitted for necropsy by German zoological gardens between 2004 and 2013. Species included 18 tigers, 8 leopards, 7 lions, 3 cheetahs and 2 cougars with an age ranging from 0.5 to 22 years. Renal lesions, predominantly tubular alterations (intra-tubular concrements, tubular degeneration, necrosis, intra-tubular cellular debris, proteinaceous casts, dilated tubuli) followed by interstitial (lympho-plasmacytic inflammation, fibrosis, metastatic-suppurative inflammation, eosinophilic inflammation) and glomerular lesions (glomerulonephritis, glomerulosclerosis, amyloidosis) were detected in 33 out of 38 animals (87%). Tumors were found in 19 of 38 felids (50%) with 12 animals showing more than one neoplasm. The tumor prevalence increased with age. Neoplasms originated from endocrine (11), genital (8), lympho-hematopoietic (5) and alimentary organs (4) as well as the mesothelium (3). Most common neoplasms comprised uterine/ovarian leiomyomas (5/2), thyroid adenomas/adenocarcinoma (5/1), pleural mesotheliomas (3), hemangiosarcomas (2) and glossal papillomas (2). Inflammatory changes were frequently encountered in the intestine and the lung. Two young animals displayed metastatic mineralization suggestive of a vitamin D- or calcium intoxication. One tiger exhibited degenerative white matter changes consistent with an entity termed large felid leukoencephalomyelopathy. Various hyperplastic, degenerative and inflammatory changes with minor clinical significance were found in several organs. Summarized, renal lesions followed by neoplastic changes as well as inflammatory changes in lung and gastrointestinal tract represent the most frequent findings in captive wild felids living in German zoological gardens.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalence of different tumors in 38 captive wild felids.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4472349&req=5

pone.0130573.g006: Prevalence of different tumors in 38 captive wild felids.

Mentions: In the present study, a total of 34 neoplastic lesions in 19 out of 38 animals (50%; Fig 6) with age ranging from 3 to 22 years (median age: 16 years) comprising 13 female and 6 male individuals were observed. In 10 animals including 6 tigers, 2 leopards, 1 lion and 1 cheetah, 2 different tumor types were found. Three different neoplasms were detected in a 17-year-old female leopard (animal no. 13) and 4 distinct tumors were present in an 18-year-old female cougar (animal no. 4). The high prevalence of neoplasms in aged captive felids is similar to observations from a study of the Knoxville zoological garden between 1979–2003 with a tumor rate of 51% [6]. This is in contrast to an earlier study from the Philadelphia zoological garden where the neoplastic rate was much lower and varied from 2.6 to 9.9% between 1901–1934 and 1935–1955, respectively [5]. The differences between the various studies may be related to increased longevity of animals in zoological gardens or environmental factors [5]. However, elevated exposure to carcinogens or infectious agents should be considered as other risk factors [9].


Pathology in Captive Wild Felids at German Zoological Gardens.

Junginger J, Hansmann F, Herder V, Lehmbecker A, Peters M, Beyerbach M, Wohlsein P, Baumgärtner W - PLoS ONE (2015)

Prevalence of different tumors in 38 captive wild felids.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4472349&req=5

pone.0130573.g006: Prevalence of different tumors in 38 captive wild felids.
Mentions: In the present study, a total of 34 neoplastic lesions in 19 out of 38 animals (50%; Fig 6) with age ranging from 3 to 22 years (median age: 16 years) comprising 13 female and 6 male individuals were observed. In 10 animals including 6 tigers, 2 leopards, 1 lion and 1 cheetah, 2 different tumor types were found. Three different neoplasms were detected in a 17-year-old female leopard (animal no. 13) and 4 distinct tumors were present in an 18-year-old female cougar (animal no. 4). The high prevalence of neoplasms in aged captive felids is similar to observations from a study of the Knoxville zoological garden between 1979–2003 with a tumor rate of 51% [6]. This is in contrast to an earlier study from the Philadelphia zoological garden where the neoplastic rate was much lower and varied from 2.6 to 9.9% between 1901–1934 and 1935–1955, respectively [5]. The differences between the various studies may be related to increased longevity of animals in zoological gardens or environmental factors [5]. However, elevated exposure to carcinogens or infectious agents should be considered as other risk factors [9].

Bottom Line: One tiger exhibited degenerative white matter changes consistent with an entity termed large felid leukoencephalomyelopathy.Various hyperplastic, degenerative and inflammatory changes with minor clinical significance were found in several organs.Summarized, renal lesions followed by neoplastic changes as well as inflammatory changes in lung and gastrointestinal tract represent the most frequent findings in captive wild felids living in German zoological gardens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover, Lower Saxony, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This retrospective study provides an overview on spontaneous diseases occurring in 38 captive wild felids submitted for necropsy by German zoological gardens between 2004 and 2013. Species included 18 tigers, 8 leopards, 7 lions, 3 cheetahs and 2 cougars with an age ranging from 0.5 to 22 years. Renal lesions, predominantly tubular alterations (intra-tubular concrements, tubular degeneration, necrosis, intra-tubular cellular debris, proteinaceous casts, dilated tubuli) followed by interstitial (lympho-plasmacytic inflammation, fibrosis, metastatic-suppurative inflammation, eosinophilic inflammation) and glomerular lesions (glomerulonephritis, glomerulosclerosis, amyloidosis) were detected in 33 out of 38 animals (87%). Tumors were found in 19 of 38 felids (50%) with 12 animals showing more than one neoplasm. The tumor prevalence increased with age. Neoplasms originated from endocrine (11), genital (8), lympho-hematopoietic (5) and alimentary organs (4) as well as the mesothelium (3). Most common neoplasms comprised uterine/ovarian leiomyomas (5/2), thyroid adenomas/adenocarcinoma (5/1), pleural mesotheliomas (3), hemangiosarcomas (2) and glossal papillomas (2). Inflammatory changes were frequently encountered in the intestine and the lung. Two young animals displayed metastatic mineralization suggestive of a vitamin D- or calcium intoxication. One tiger exhibited degenerative white matter changes consistent with an entity termed large felid leukoencephalomyelopathy. Various hyperplastic, degenerative and inflammatory changes with minor clinical significance were found in several organs. Summarized, renal lesions followed by neoplastic changes as well as inflammatory changes in lung and gastrointestinal tract represent the most frequent findings in captive wild felids living in German zoological gardens.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus