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Potential use of fatty acid profiles of the adductor muscle of cockles (Cerastoderma edule) for traceability of collection site.

Ricardo F, Pimentel T, Moreira AS, Rey F, Coimbra MA, Rosário Domingues M, Domingues P, Costa Leal M, Calado R - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Geographic traceability of seafood is key for controlling its quality and safeguarding consumers' interest.Cockles further away from the inlet, i.e. in areas exposed to a higher saline variation, exhibited lower levels of saturated fatty acids, which are key for stabilizing the bilayer structure of cell membranes, and a higher percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which enhance bilayer fluidity.Results suggest that the structural nature of the lipids present in the AM provides a stable fatty acid signature and holds potential for tracing the origin of bivalves to their capture/production areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Biologia &CESAM, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
Geographic traceability of seafood is key for controlling its quality and safeguarding consumers' interest. The present study assessed if the fatty acid (FA) profile of the adductor muscle (AM) of fresh cockles (Cerastoderma edule) can be used to discriminate the origin of specimens collected in different bivalve capture/production areas legally defined within a coastal lagoon. Results suggest that this biochemical approach holds the potential to trace sampling locations with a spatial resolution <10 Km, even for areas with identical classification for bivalve production. Cockles further away from the inlet, i.e. in areas exposed to a higher saline variation, exhibited lower levels of saturated fatty acids, which are key for stabilizing the bilayer structure of cell membranes, and a higher percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which enhance bilayer fluidity. Results suggest that the structural nature of the lipids present in the AM provides a stable fatty acid signature and holds potential for tracing the origin of bivalves to their capture/production areas.

No MeSH data available.


Principal coordinates analysis of the fatty acid composition of the adductor muscle of Cerastoderma edule from São Jacinto, Mira, Ilhavo and Espinheiro channels in Ria de Aveiro, Portugal.
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f2: Principal coordinates analysis of the fatty acid composition of the adductor muscle of Cerastoderma edule from São Jacinto, Mira, Ilhavo and Espinheiro channels in Ria de Aveiro, Portugal.

Mentions: The first two axes of the PCO analysis explained 68.3% of the FA variation in the data set (PCO axis 1: 56.8%, PCO axis 2: 11.5%) (Fig. 2). ANOSIM revealed significant differences among FA profiles of C. edule from different channels (p = 0.041) with the exception of specimens sampled in Ilhavo and Espinheiro (p = 0.155). The ANOSIM performed using FA classes (i.e. SFA, MUFA and PUFA) also showed significant differences among channels, apart from São Jacinto and Espinheiro (p = 0.059) and Ilhavo and Espinheiro (p = 0.296) for SFA, and Mira and Espinheiro Channels (p = 0.071) and Ilhavo and Espinheiro Channels (p = 0.179) for PUFA (Table 2). SIMPER analysis (Table 3) revealed that PA and DHA were generally among the FAs that most contributed for the differences recorded among channels (e.g. more than 22% of the differences recorded between São Jacinto and Espinheiro were explained by 16:0 and DHA). While specimens originating from Espinheiro and Ilhavo channels showed a relatively similar FA profile, the content of oleic acid (18:1n9c) in the AM of C. edule was notably different between these two locations (p = 0.0283, Table 1). SIMPER also revealed that myristic acid was responsible for almost 10% of all differences recorded between the pool of FAs displayed by the AM of cockles collected in these two channels (Table 3).


Potential use of fatty acid profiles of the adductor muscle of cockles (Cerastoderma edule) for traceability of collection site.

Ricardo F, Pimentel T, Moreira AS, Rey F, Coimbra MA, Rosário Domingues M, Domingues P, Costa Leal M, Calado R - Sci Rep (2015)

Principal coordinates analysis of the fatty acid composition of the adductor muscle of Cerastoderma edule from São Jacinto, Mira, Ilhavo and Espinheiro channels in Ria de Aveiro, Portugal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4471671&req=5

f2: Principal coordinates analysis of the fatty acid composition of the adductor muscle of Cerastoderma edule from São Jacinto, Mira, Ilhavo and Espinheiro channels in Ria de Aveiro, Portugal.
Mentions: The first two axes of the PCO analysis explained 68.3% of the FA variation in the data set (PCO axis 1: 56.8%, PCO axis 2: 11.5%) (Fig. 2). ANOSIM revealed significant differences among FA profiles of C. edule from different channels (p = 0.041) with the exception of specimens sampled in Ilhavo and Espinheiro (p = 0.155). The ANOSIM performed using FA classes (i.e. SFA, MUFA and PUFA) also showed significant differences among channels, apart from São Jacinto and Espinheiro (p = 0.059) and Ilhavo and Espinheiro (p = 0.296) for SFA, and Mira and Espinheiro Channels (p = 0.071) and Ilhavo and Espinheiro Channels (p = 0.179) for PUFA (Table 2). SIMPER analysis (Table 3) revealed that PA and DHA were generally among the FAs that most contributed for the differences recorded among channels (e.g. more than 22% of the differences recorded between São Jacinto and Espinheiro were explained by 16:0 and DHA). While specimens originating from Espinheiro and Ilhavo channels showed a relatively similar FA profile, the content of oleic acid (18:1n9c) in the AM of C. edule was notably different between these two locations (p = 0.0283, Table 1). SIMPER also revealed that myristic acid was responsible for almost 10% of all differences recorded between the pool of FAs displayed by the AM of cockles collected in these two channels (Table 3).

Bottom Line: Geographic traceability of seafood is key for controlling its quality and safeguarding consumers' interest.Cockles further away from the inlet, i.e. in areas exposed to a higher saline variation, exhibited lower levels of saturated fatty acids, which are key for stabilizing the bilayer structure of cell membranes, and a higher percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which enhance bilayer fluidity.Results suggest that the structural nature of the lipids present in the AM provides a stable fatty acid signature and holds potential for tracing the origin of bivalves to their capture/production areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Biologia &CESAM, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal.

ABSTRACT
Geographic traceability of seafood is key for controlling its quality and safeguarding consumers' interest. The present study assessed if the fatty acid (FA) profile of the adductor muscle (AM) of fresh cockles (Cerastoderma edule) can be used to discriminate the origin of specimens collected in different bivalve capture/production areas legally defined within a coastal lagoon. Results suggest that this biochemical approach holds the potential to trace sampling locations with a spatial resolution <10 Km, even for areas with identical classification for bivalve production. Cockles further away from the inlet, i.e. in areas exposed to a higher saline variation, exhibited lower levels of saturated fatty acids, which are key for stabilizing the bilayer structure of cell membranes, and a higher percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which enhance bilayer fluidity. Results suggest that the structural nature of the lipids present in the AM provides a stable fatty acid signature and holds potential for tracing the origin of bivalves to their capture/production areas.

No MeSH data available.