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Puberty timing associated with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and also diverse health outcomes in men and women: the UK Biobank study.

Day FR, Elks CE, Murray A, Ong KK, Perry JR - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, compared to the median/average group, earlier or later puberty timing in women or men was associated with higher risks for 48 adverse outcomes, across a range of cancers, cardio-metabolic, gynaecological/obstetric, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and neuro-cognitive categories.Notably, both early and late menarche were associated with higher risks for early natural menopause in women.Puberty timing in both men and women appears to have a profound impact on later health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge Biomedical Campus Box 285, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ.

ABSTRACT
Early puberty timing is associated with higher risks for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease in women and therefore represents a potential target for early preventive interventions. We characterised the range of diseases and other adverse health outcomes associated with early or late puberty timing in men and women in the very large UK Biobank study. Recalled puberty timing and past/current diseases were self-reported by questionnaire. We limited analyses to individuals of White ethnicity (250,037 women; 197,714 men) and to disease outcomes with at least 500 cases (~ 0.2% prevalence) and we applied stringent correction for multiple testing (corrected threshold P < 7.48 Ɨ 10(-5)). In models adjusted for socioeconomic position and adiposity/body composition variables, both in women and men separately, earlier puberty timing was associated with higher risks for angina, hypertension and T2D. Furthermore, compared to the median/average group, earlier or later puberty timing in women or men was associated with higher risks for 48 adverse outcomes, across a range of cancers, cardio-metabolic, gynaecological/obstetric, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and neuro-cognitive categories. Notably, both early and late menarche were associated with higher risks for early natural menopause in women. Puberty timing in both men and women appears to have a profound impact on later health.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Associations between early or late menarche timing and adverse health outcomes in women.Displayed outcomes showed study-wise significant (Pā€‰<ā€‰7.48ā€‰Ć—ā€‰10-5) associations in any model (linear, early or late menarche). Effect estimates (Ā± 95% CI) are shown for early (the earliest quintile) or late (the latest quintile) menarche groups compared to the middle quintile (reference group). Purple centres (with purple error bars) indicate significant associations from baseline models (adjusted for birth year, age and age squared). Green centres (with green error bars) indicate significant associations from models adjusted for socio-economic and adiposity/body composition variables (except for Obesity). Grey error bars indicate associations that did not reach study-wise significance.
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f2: Associations between early or late menarche timing and adverse health outcomes in women.Displayed outcomes showed study-wise significant (Pā€‰<ā€‰7.48ā€‰Ć—ā€‰10-5) associations in any model (linear, early or late menarche). Effect estimates (Ā± 95% CI) are shown for early (the earliest quintile) or late (the latest quintile) menarche groups compared to the middle quintile (reference group). Purple centres (with purple error bars) indicate significant associations from baseline models (adjusted for birth year, age and age squared). Green centres (with green error bars) indicate significant associations from models adjusted for socio-economic and adiposity/body composition variables (except for Obesity). Grey error bars indicate associations that did not reach study-wise significance.

Mentions: Consideration of categorical early/late menarche models increased the number of associated adverse health outcomes to 42 (33 for early menarche, 19 for late menarche, and 25 in linear trend models). Remarkably, in all of the categorical associations, both early and late menarche groups were associated with higher risks of adverse outcomes compared to the median quintile group, with the exception of osteoporosis (lower in early menarche), obesity (lower in late menarche), and uterine fibroids (lower in late menarche) (Figs 1 and 2).


Puberty timing associated with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and also diverse health outcomes in men and women: the UK Biobank study.

Day FR, Elks CE, Murray A, Ong KK, Perry JR - Sci Rep (2015)

Associations between early or late menarche timing and adverse health outcomes in women.Displayed outcomes showed study-wise significant (Pā€‰<ā€‰7.48ā€‰Ć—ā€‰10-5) associations in any model (linear, early or late menarche). Effect estimates (Ā± 95% CI) are shown for early (the earliest quintile) or late (the latest quintile) menarche groups compared to the middle quintile (reference group). Purple centres (with purple error bars) indicate significant associations from baseline models (adjusted for birth year, age and age squared). Green centres (with green error bars) indicate significant associations from models adjusted for socio-economic and adiposity/body composition variables (except for Obesity). Grey error bars indicate associations that did not reach study-wise significance.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4471670&req=5

f2: Associations between early or late menarche timing and adverse health outcomes in women.Displayed outcomes showed study-wise significant (Pā€‰<ā€‰7.48ā€‰Ć—ā€‰10-5) associations in any model (linear, early or late menarche). Effect estimates (Ā± 95% CI) are shown for early (the earliest quintile) or late (the latest quintile) menarche groups compared to the middle quintile (reference group). Purple centres (with purple error bars) indicate significant associations from baseline models (adjusted for birth year, age and age squared). Green centres (with green error bars) indicate significant associations from models adjusted for socio-economic and adiposity/body composition variables (except for Obesity). Grey error bars indicate associations that did not reach study-wise significance.
Mentions: Consideration of categorical early/late menarche models increased the number of associated adverse health outcomes to 42 (33 for early menarche, 19 for late menarche, and 25 in linear trend models). Remarkably, in all of the categorical associations, both early and late menarche groups were associated with higher risks of adverse outcomes compared to the median quintile group, with the exception of osteoporosis (lower in early menarche), obesity (lower in late menarche), and uterine fibroids (lower in late menarche) (Figs 1 and 2).

Bottom Line: Furthermore, compared to the median/average group, earlier or later puberty timing in women or men was associated with higher risks for 48 adverse outcomes, across a range of cancers, cardio-metabolic, gynaecological/obstetric, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and neuro-cognitive categories.Notably, both early and late menarche were associated with higher risks for early natural menopause in women.Puberty timing in both men and women appears to have a profound impact on later health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge Biomedical Campus Box 285, Cambridge, CB2 0QQ.

ABSTRACT
Early puberty timing is associated with higher risks for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease in women and therefore represents a potential target for early preventive interventions. We characterised the range of diseases and other adverse health outcomes associated with early or late puberty timing in men and women in the very large UK Biobank study. Recalled puberty timing and past/current diseases were self-reported by questionnaire. We limited analyses to individuals of White ethnicity (250,037 women; 197,714 men) and to disease outcomes with at least 500 cases (~ 0.2% prevalence) and we applied stringent correction for multiple testing (corrected threshold P < 7.48 Ɨ 10(-5)). In models adjusted for socioeconomic position and adiposity/body composition variables, both in women and men separately, earlier puberty timing was associated with higher risks for angina, hypertension and T2D. Furthermore, compared to the median/average group, earlier or later puberty timing in women or men was associated with higher risks for 48 adverse outcomes, across a range of cancers, cardio-metabolic, gynaecological/obstetric, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and neuro-cognitive categories. Notably, both early and late menarche were associated with higher risks for early natural menopause in women. Puberty timing in both men and women appears to have a profound impact on later health.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus