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Chemopreventive effect of methanolic extract of Azadirachta indica on experimental Trypanosoma brucei induced oxidative stress in dogs.

Omobowale TO, Oyagbemi AA, Oyewunmi OA, Adejumobi OA - Pharmacognosy Res (2015 Jul-Sep)

Bottom Line: However, the reduced glutathione (GSH) content of the erythrocyte increased significantly in animals pre-treated with 50 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg of A. indica respectively.Markers of oxidative stress such as malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide generated were higher in animals infected with T. brucei with no significant (P >0.05) difference compared to the values obtained in pre-treated animals.Pre-treatment with 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg of A. indica significantly (P < 0.05) decreased serum myeloperoxidase activity at 2 weeks post-infection with T. brucei.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Veterinary Medicine and Physiology, Biochemistry and Pharmacology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The medicinal properties of Azadirachta indica have been harnessed for many years in the treatment of many diseases in both humans and animals.

Materials and methods: Twenty-five apparently healthy dogs weighing between 3 and 8 kg were randomly divided into five groups with five dogs in each group. Ameliorative effect of A. indica on erythrocyte antioxidant status and markers of oxidative stress were assessed. Liver and kidney function tests were also performed.

Results: Pre-treatment with methanolic extract of Azadirachta indica (MEAI) at different doses did not significantly alter the values of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activity in Trypanosoma brucei infection. Although, serum creatinine significantly (P < 0.05) decreased with pre-treatment with 50 mg/kg A. indica, after 2 weeks of T. brucei infection. However, the reduced glutathione (GSH) content of the erythrocyte increased significantly in animals pre-treated with 50 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg of A. indica respectively. Markers of oxidative stress such as malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide generated were higher in animals infected with T. brucei with no significant (P >0.05) difference compared to the values obtained in pre-treated animals. Pre-treatment with 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg of A. indica significantly (P < 0.05) decreased serum myeloperoxidase activity at 2 weeks post-infection with T. brucei.

Conclusion: From this study, MEAI showed significant ability to attenuate oxidative stress and inflammation during experimental T. brucei infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of AI on MAD in experimental T. brucei infection. Values are presented as mean ± standard deviation. Superscript (a) Indicates statistically significant when groups II, III, IV and V are compared with group I. Superscript (b) Indicates statistically significant when groups III, IV and V are compared with group II
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Figure 6: Effect of AI on MAD in experimental T. brucei infection. Values are presented as mean ± standard deviation. Superscript (a) Indicates statistically significant when groups II, III, IV and V are compared with group I. Superscript (b) Indicates statistically significant when groups III, IV and V are compared with group II

Mentions: Pretreatment of dogs with MEAI led to no significant (P > 0.05) difference in the markers of oxidative stress (MDA and H2 O2) after 1-week of administration at different dosages [Figures 6 and 7]. In addition, there was no significant (P > 0.05) difference in the values of MDA and H2 O2 in the groups pretreated with MEAI after 2 weeks and 4 weeks of with T. brucei infection [Figures 6 and 7]. The GSH content was significantly (P < 0.05) increase in animals pretreated with MEAI at (50 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg) after 2 weeks of infection [Figure 8]. However, there was no observable difference in the values of GSH content after 4 weeks of infection [Figure 8] in dogs pretreated with AI extract at different doses [Figure 8]. There was no significant (P > 0.05) difference in the values of antioxidant enzymes (CAT, SOD and GPX) in the groups pretreated with MEAI extract after 2 weeks of T. brucei infection [Figures 9–11] whereas the activity of these enzymes decrease but not significantly different after 4 weeks of T. brucei infection [Figures 9 and 11].


Chemopreventive effect of methanolic extract of Azadirachta indica on experimental Trypanosoma brucei induced oxidative stress in dogs.

Omobowale TO, Oyagbemi AA, Oyewunmi OA, Adejumobi OA - Pharmacognosy Res (2015 Jul-Sep)

Effect of AI on MAD in experimental T. brucei infection. Values are presented as mean ± standard deviation. Superscript (a) Indicates statistically significant when groups II, III, IV and V are compared with group I. Superscript (b) Indicates statistically significant when groups III, IV and V are compared with group II
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4471651&req=5

Figure 6: Effect of AI on MAD in experimental T. brucei infection. Values are presented as mean ± standard deviation. Superscript (a) Indicates statistically significant when groups II, III, IV and V are compared with group I. Superscript (b) Indicates statistically significant when groups III, IV and V are compared with group II
Mentions: Pretreatment of dogs with MEAI led to no significant (P > 0.05) difference in the markers of oxidative stress (MDA and H2 O2) after 1-week of administration at different dosages [Figures 6 and 7]. In addition, there was no significant (P > 0.05) difference in the values of MDA and H2 O2 in the groups pretreated with MEAI after 2 weeks and 4 weeks of with T. brucei infection [Figures 6 and 7]. The GSH content was significantly (P < 0.05) increase in animals pretreated with MEAI at (50 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg) after 2 weeks of infection [Figure 8]. However, there was no observable difference in the values of GSH content after 4 weeks of infection [Figure 8] in dogs pretreated with AI extract at different doses [Figure 8]. There was no significant (P > 0.05) difference in the values of antioxidant enzymes (CAT, SOD and GPX) in the groups pretreated with MEAI extract after 2 weeks of T. brucei infection [Figures 9–11] whereas the activity of these enzymes decrease but not significantly different after 4 weeks of T. brucei infection [Figures 9 and 11].

Bottom Line: However, the reduced glutathione (GSH) content of the erythrocyte increased significantly in animals pre-treated with 50 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg of A. indica respectively.Markers of oxidative stress such as malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide generated were higher in animals infected with T. brucei with no significant (P >0.05) difference compared to the values obtained in pre-treated animals.Pre-treatment with 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg of A. indica significantly (P < 0.05) decreased serum myeloperoxidase activity at 2 weeks post-infection with T. brucei.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Veterinary Medicine and Physiology, Biochemistry and Pharmacology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The medicinal properties of Azadirachta indica have been harnessed for many years in the treatment of many diseases in both humans and animals.

Materials and methods: Twenty-five apparently healthy dogs weighing between 3 and 8 kg were randomly divided into five groups with five dogs in each group. Ameliorative effect of A. indica on erythrocyte antioxidant status and markers of oxidative stress were assessed. Liver and kidney function tests were also performed.

Results: Pre-treatment with methanolic extract of Azadirachta indica (MEAI) at different doses did not significantly alter the values of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activity in Trypanosoma brucei infection. Although, serum creatinine significantly (P < 0.05) decreased with pre-treatment with 50 mg/kg A. indica, after 2 weeks of T. brucei infection. However, the reduced glutathione (GSH) content of the erythrocyte increased significantly in animals pre-treated with 50 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg of A. indica respectively. Markers of oxidative stress such as malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide generated were higher in animals infected with T. brucei with no significant (P >0.05) difference compared to the values obtained in pre-treated animals. Pre-treatment with 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg of A. indica significantly (P < 0.05) decreased serum myeloperoxidase activity at 2 weeks post-infection with T. brucei.

Conclusion: From this study, MEAI showed significant ability to attenuate oxidative stress and inflammation during experimental T. brucei infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus