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The aspect of experience in ultra-triathlon races.

Knechtle B, Zingg MA, Rosemann T, Rüst CA - Springerplus (2015)

Bottom Line: The number of finished shorter races (i.e. Double and Triple Iron ultra-triathlon) was not associated with the number of finished longer races (i.e. Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon) whereas both split and overall race times correlated to split and overall race times of the longer races with the exception of the swimming split times in Double Iron ultra-triathlon showing no correlation with swimming split times in both Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon.In summary, previous experience seemed of importance in performance for longer ultra-triathlon races (i.e. Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon) where the personal best times of shorter races (i.e. Double and Triple Iron ultra-triathlon) were important, but not the number of previously finished races.For athletes and coaches, fast race times in shorter ultra-triathlon races (i.e. Double and Triple Iron ultra-triathlon) are more important than a large of number finished races in order to achieve a fast race time in a longer ultra-triathlon (i.e. Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Facharzt FMH für Allgemeinmedizin, Gesundheitszentrum St. Gallen, Vadianstrasse 26, 9001 St. Gallen, Switzerland ; Institute of Primary Care, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Previous experience seems to be an important predictor for endurance and ultra-endurance performance. The present study investigated whether the number of previously completed races and/or the personal best times in shorter races is more predictive for performance in longer non-stop ultra-triathlons such as a Deca Iron ultra-triathlon. All female and male ultra-triathletes who had finished between 1985 and 2014 at least one Double Iron ultra-triathlon (i.e. 7.6 km swimming, 360 km cycling and 84.4 km running), one Triple Iron ultra-triathlon (i.e. 11.4 km swimming, 540 km cycling and 126.6 km running), one Quintuple Iron ultra-triathlon (i.e. 19 km swimming, 900 km cycling and 221 km running) and one Deca Iron ultra-triathlon (i.e. 38 km swimming, 1,800 km cycling and 422 km running) were identified and their best race times for each distance were recorded. Multiple regression analysis (stepwise, forward selection, p of F for inclusion <0.05, p of F for exclusion >0.1, listwise deletion) was used to determine all variables correlating to overall race time and performance in split disciplines for both Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon. The number of finished shorter races (i.e. Double and Triple Iron ultra-triathlon) was not associated with the number of finished longer races (i.e. Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon) whereas both split and overall race times correlated to split and overall race times of the longer races with the exception of the swimming split times in Double Iron ultra-triathlon showing no correlation with swimming split times in both Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon. In summary, previous experience seemed of importance in performance for longer ultra-triathlon races (i.e. Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon) where the personal best times of shorter races (i.e. Double and Triple Iron ultra-triathlon) were important, but not the number of previously finished races. For athletes and coaches, fast race times in shorter ultra-triathlon races (i.e. Double and Triple Iron ultra-triathlon) are more important than a large of number finished races in order to achieve a fast race time in a longer ultra-triathlon (i.e. Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The correlation in cycling split times between Double and Quintuple (a), Triple and Quintuple (b), Double and Deca (c), Triple and Deca (d) and Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon (e).
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Fig2: The correlation in cycling split times between Double and Quintuple (a), Triple and Quintuple (b), Double and Deca (c), Triple and Deca (d) and Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon (e).

Mentions: For both Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon, all split times correlated to overall race times (Table 1). In detail, swimming split times in Triple Iron ultra-triathlon correlated to split times in both Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon and swimming split times in Quintuple Iron correlated to swimming split times in Deca Iron ultra-triathlon (Figure 1). Swimming split times in Double Iron ultra-triathlon, however, showed no correlation with swimming split times in both Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon. For cycling (Figure 2) and running (Figure 3), split times in the shorter distances correlated to split times in the longer distances. Also, overall race times in the shorter distances were associated with overall race times in the longer distances (Figure 4).Table 1


The aspect of experience in ultra-triathlon races.

Knechtle B, Zingg MA, Rosemann T, Rüst CA - Springerplus (2015)

The correlation in cycling split times between Double and Quintuple (a), Triple and Quintuple (b), Double and Deca (c), Triple and Deca (d) and Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon (e).
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4471069&req=5

Fig2: The correlation in cycling split times between Double and Quintuple (a), Triple and Quintuple (b), Double and Deca (c), Triple and Deca (d) and Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon (e).
Mentions: For both Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon, all split times correlated to overall race times (Table 1). In detail, swimming split times in Triple Iron ultra-triathlon correlated to split times in both Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon and swimming split times in Quintuple Iron correlated to swimming split times in Deca Iron ultra-triathlon (Figure 1). Swimming split times in Double Iron ultra-triathlon, however, showed no correlation with swimming split times in both Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon. For cycling (Figure 2) and running (Figure 3), split times in the shorter distances correlated to split times in the longer distances. Also, overall race times in the shorter distances were associated with overall race times in the longer distances (Figure 4).Table 1

Bottom Line: The number of finished shorter races (i.e. Double and Triple Iron ultra-triathlon) was not associated with the number of finished longer races (i.e. Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon) whereas both split and overall race times correlated to split and overall race times of the longer races with the exception of the swimming split times in Double Iron ultra-triathlon showing no correlation with swimming split times in both Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon.In summary, previous experience seemed of importance in performance for longer ultra-triathlon races (i.e. Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon) where the personal best times of shorter races (i.e. Double and Triple Iron ultra-triathlon) were important, but not the number of previously finished races.For athletes and coaches, fast race times in shorter ultra-triathlon races (i.e. Double and Triple Iron ultra-triathlon) are more important than a large of number finished races in order to achieve a fast race time in a longer ultra-triathlon (i.e. Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Facharzt FMH für Allgemeinmedizin, Gesundheitszentrum St. Gallen, Vadianstrasse 26, 9001 St. Gallen, Switzerland ; Institute of Primary Care, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Previous experience seems to be an important predictor for endurance and ultra-endurance performance. The present study investigated whether the number of previously completed races and/or the personal best times in shorter races is more predictive for performance in longer non-stop ultra-triathlons such as a Deca Iron ultra-triathlon. All female and male ultra-triathletes who had finished between 1985 and 2014 at least one Double Iron ultra-triathlon (i.e. 7.6 km swimming, 360 km cycling and 84.4 km running), one Triple Iron ultra-triathlon (i.e. 11.4 km swimming, 540 km cycling and 126.6 km running), one Quintuple Iron ultra-triathlon (i.e. 19 km swimming, 900 km cycling and 221 km running) and one Deca Iron ultra-triathlon (i.e. 38 km swimming, 1,800 km cycling and 422 km running) were identified and their best race times for each distance were recorded. Multiple regression analysis (stepwise, forward selection, p of F for inclusion <0.05, p of F for exclusion >0.1, listwise deletion) was used to determine all variables correlating to overall race time and performance in split disciplines for both Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon. The number of finished shorter races (i.e. Double and Triple Iron ultra-triathlon) was not associated with the number of finished longer races (i.e. Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon) whereas both split and overall race times correlated to split and overall race times of the longer races with the exception of the swimming split times in Double Iron ultra-triathlon showing no correlation with swimming split times in both Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon. In summary, previous experience seemed of importance in performance for longer ultra-triathlon races (i.e. Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon) where the personal best times of shorter races (i.e. Double and Triple Iron ultra-triathlon) were important, but not the number of previously finished races. For athletes and coaches, fast race times in shorter ultra-triathlon races (i.e. Double and Triple Iron ultra-triathlon) are more important than a large of number finished races in order to achieve a fast race time in a longer ultra-triathlon (i.e. Quintuple and Deca Iron ultra-triathlon).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus