Limits...
Estimating the Size and Impact of the Ecological Restoration Economy.

BenDor T, Lester TW, Livengood A, Davis A, Yonavjak L - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Domestic public debate continues over the economic impacts of environmental regulations that require environmental restoration.Based on this analysis we conclude that the domestic ecological restoration sector directly employs ~ 126,000 workers and generates ~ $9.5 billion in economic output (sales) annually.This activity supports an additional 95,000 jobs and $15 billion in economic output through indirect (business-to-business) linkages and increased household spending.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of City and Regional Planning, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Domestic public debate continues over the economic impacts of environmental regulations that require environmental restoration. This debate has occurred in the absence of broad-scale empirical research on economic output and employment resulting from environmental restoration, restoration-related conservation, and mitigation actions - the activities that are part of what we term the "restoration economy." In this article, we provide a high-level accounting of the size and scope of the restoration economy in terms of employment, value added, and overall economic output on a national scale. We conducted a national survey of businesses that participate in restoration work in order to estimate the total sales and number of jobs directly associated with the restoration economy, and to provide a profile of this nascent sector in terms of type of restoration work, industrial classification, workforce needs, and growth potential. We use survey results as inputs into a national input-output model (IMPLAN 3.1) in order to estimate the indirect and induced economic impacts of restoration activities. Based on this analysis we conclude that the domestic ecological restoration sector directly employs ~ 126,000 workers and generates ~ $9.5 billion in economic output (sales) annually. This activity supports an additional 95,000 jobs and $15 billion in economic output through indirect (business-to-business) linkages and increased household spending.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Distribution of respondents by business function within the restoration economy. (B) Distribution of respondents by type of restoration work.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4470920&req=5

pone.0128339.g001: (A) Distribution of respondents by business function within the restoration economy. (B) Distribution of respondents by type of restoration work.

Mentions: We can also describe the broader restoration sector by both the specific business function and type of restoration work of each establishment. The largest segments of restoration work involve 1) planning, design, and engineering activities and 2) physical restoration—the actual earth moving and site construction (Fig 1a). Survey respondents were evenly distributed in terms of the type of restoration work conducted, with wetland restoration (13%) and aquatic and riparian restoration (18%) representing the largest categories (Fig 1b). This likely indicates the role of the Clean Water Act’s Section 404 compensatory mitigation requirements in inducing restoration work [30].


Estimating the Size and Impact of the Ecological Restoration Economy.

BenDor T, Lester TW, Livengood A, Davis A, Yonavjak L - PLoS ONE (2015)

(A) Distribution of respondents by business function within the restoration economy. (B) Distribution of respondents by type of restoration work.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4470920&req=5

pone.0128339.g001: (A) Distribution of respondents by business function within the restoration economy. (B) Distribution of respondents by type of restoration work.
Mentions: We can also describe the broader restoration sector by both the specific business function and type of restoration work of each establishment. The largest segments of restoration work involve 1) planning, design, and engineering activities and 2) physical restoration—the actual earth moving and site construction (Fig 1a). Survey respondents were evenly distributed in terms of the type of restoration work conducted, with wetland restoration (13%) and aquatic and riparian restoration (18%) representing the largest categories (Fig 1b). This likely indicates the role of the Clean Water Act’s Section 404 compensatory mitigation requirements in inducing restoration work [30].

Bottom Line: Domestic public debate continues over the economic impacts of environmental regulations that require environmental restoration.Based on this analysis we conclude that the domestic ecological restoration sector directly employs ~ 126,000 workers and generates ~ $9.5 billion in economic output (sales) annually.This activity supports an additional 95,000 jobs and $15 billion in economic output through indirect (business-to-business) linkages and increased household spending.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of City and Regional Planning, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Domestic public debate continues over the economic impacts of environmental regulations that require environmental restoration. This debate has occurred in the absence of broad-scale empirical research on economic output and employment resulting from environmental restoration, restoration-related conservation, and mitigation actions - the activities that are part of what we term the "restoration economy." In this article, we provide a high-level accounting of the size and scope of the restoration economy in terms of employment, value added, and overall economic output on a national scale. We conducted a national survey of businesses that participate in restoration work in order to estimate the total sales and number of jobs directly associated with the restoration economy, and to provide a profile of this nascent sector in terms of type of restoration work, industrial classification, workforce needs, and growth potential. We use survey results as inputs into a national input-output model (IMPLAN 3.1) in order to estimate the indirect and induced economic impacts of restoration activities. Based on this analysis we conclude that the domestic ecological restoration sector directly employs ~ 126,000 workers and generates ~ $9.5 billion in economic output (sales) annually. This activity supports an additional 95,000 jobs and $15 billion in economic output through indirect (business-to-business) linkages and increased household spending.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus