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Parental Reports on Touch Screen Use in Early Childhood.

Cristia A, Seidl A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A brief online questionnaire queried over 450 French parents of infants between the ages of 5 and 40 months on their young child's use of touch-screen technology.Parents estimated frequency of use, and further completed several checklists.Additionally, these parental reports point to clear developmental trends for certain types of interactive gestures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique (ENS, EHESS, CNRS), Département d'Etudes Cognitives, Ecole Normale Supérieure, PSL Research University, Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
Touch screens are increasingly prevalent, and anecdotal evidence suggests that young children are very drawn towards them. Yet there is little data regarding how young children use them. A brief online questionnaire queried over 450 French parents of infants between the ages of 5 and 40 months on their young child's use of touch-screen technology. Parents estimated frequency of use, and further completed several checklists. Results suggest that, among respondent families, the use of touch screens is widespread in early childhood, meaning that most children have some exposure to touch screens. Among child users, certain activities are more frequently reported to be liked than others, findings that we discuss in light of current concern for children's employment of time and the cognitive effects of passive media exposure. Additionally, these parental reports point to clear developmental trends for certain types of interactive gestures. These results contribute to the investigation of touch screen use on early development and suggest a number of considerations that should help improve the design of applications geared towards toddlers, particularly for scientific purposes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Activity reportedly liked by age decile.Caregivers’ report of whether their child enjoyed an activity (red) or not (white), grouping children in ten equally-sized age groups. The limits of some of the age groups (in year;month) are given in the x-axis (see Fig 2 for full list).
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pone.0128338.g003: Activity reportedly liked by age decile.Caregivers’ report of whether their child enjoyed an activity (red) or not (white), grouping children in ten equally-sized age groups. The limits of some of the age groups (in year;month) are given in the x-axis (see Fig 2 for full list).

Mentions: Since the interaction between activity identity and age renders an interpretation of the main effects of these two variables difficult, we carried out regressions on each activity separately. Given that frequency of use did not interact with activity identity or age, it was not included in the follow-up regressions. The results of the four binomial regressions (one for each activity in the questionnaire) are summarized in Table 1. Putting these results together with Fig 3, we can offer a tentative interpretation of both the main logistic regression effects and the interaction. It appears that, overall, most children reportedly like viewing photographs and videos, and that this preference increases with age in the case of videos. In contrast, about half of the children at any age are said to like sound-image apps, with no significant developmental differences. Few children are said to like puzzles, although this proportion increases dramatically with age. Indeed, the main effect of age likely captured the fact that “yes” responses are, overall, more likely the older the child is.


Parental Reports on Touch Screen Use in Early Childhood.

Cristia A, Seidl A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Activity reportedly liked by age decile.Caregivers’ report of whether their child enjoyed an activity (red) or not (white), grouping children in ten equally-sized age groups. The limits of some of the age groups (in year;month) are given in the x-axis (see Fig 2 for full list).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4470913&req=5

pone.0128338.g003: Activity reportedly liked by age decile.Caregivers’ report of whether their child enjoyed an activity (red) or not (white), grouping children in ten equally-sized age groups. The limits of some of the age groups (in year;month) are given in the x-axis (see Fig 2 for full list).
Mentions: Since the interaction between activity identity and age renders an interpretation of the main effects of these two variables difficult, we carried out regressions on each activity separately. Given that frequency of use did not interact with activity identity or age, it was not included in the follow-up regressions. The results of the four binomial regressions (one for each activity in the questionnaire) are summarized in Table 1. Putting these results together with Fig 3, we can offer a tentative interpretation of both the main logistic regression effects and the interaction. It appears that, overall, most children reportedly like viewing photographs and videos, and that this preference increases with age in the case of videos. In contrast, about half of the children at any age are said to like sound-image apps, with no significant developmental differences. Few children are said to like puzzles, although this proportion increases dramatically with age. Indeed, the main effect of age likely captured the fact that “yes” responses are, overall, more likely the older the child is.

Bottom Line: A brief online questionnaire queried over 450 French parents of infants between the ages of 5 and 40 months on their young child's use of touch-screen technology.Parents estimated frequency of use, and further completed several checklists.Additionally, these parental reports point to clear developmental trends for certain types of interactive gestures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique (ENS, EHESS, CNRS), Département d'Etudes Cognitives, Ecole Normale Supérieure, PSL Research University, Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
Touch screens are increasingly prevalent, and anecdotal evidence suggests that young children are very drawn towards them. Yet there is little data regarding how young children use them. A brief online questionnaire queried over 450 French parents of infants between the ages of 5 and 40 months on their young child's use of touch-screen technology. Parents estimated frequency of use, and further completed several checklists. Results suggest that, among respondent families, the use of touch screens is widespread in early childhood, meaning that most children have some exposure to touch screens. Among child users, certain activities are more frequently reported to be liked than others, findings that we discuss in light of current concern for children's employment of time and the cognitive effects of passive media exposure. Additionally, these parental reports point to clear developmental trends for certain types of interactive gestures. These results contribute to the investigation of touch screen use on early development and suggest a number of considerations that should help improve the design of applications geared towards toddlers, particularly for scientific purposes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus