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Effect of Low Temperature and Wheat Winter-Hardiness on Survival of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici under Controlled Conditions.

Ma L, Qiao J, Kong X, Zou Y, Xu X, Chen X, Hu X - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The percentage of Pst biomass that was viable in detached and attached leaves under low temperatures decreased over time.The survival of Pst in cultivars with strong winter-hardiness at 0°C and -5°C was greater than those with weak winter-hardiness.Further field evaluation is necessary to assess whether inclusion of other factors such as moisture and snow cover could improve the model performance in predicting Pst overwintering potential, and hence the epidemic in spring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A&F University, Taicheng Road 3, Yangling 712100, China.

ABSTRACT
Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most important diseases of wheat worldwide. Understanding the survival of Pst during the overwintering period is critical for predicting Pst epidemics in the spring. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) methods quantifying Pst DNA and RNA (cDNA) were developed and compared for the ability to quantify viable Pst in leaf tissues. Both qPCR of DNA and RNA can provide reliable measurement of viable Pst in plant tissues prior to the late sporulation stage for which qPCR of DNA gave a much higher estimate of fungal biomass than qPCR of RNA. The percentage of Pst biomass that was viable in detached and attached leaves under low temperatures decreased over time. Pst survived longer on attached leaves than on detached leaves. The survival of Pst in cultivars with strong winter-hardiness at 0°C and -5°C was greater than those with weak winter-hardiness. However, such differences in Pst survival among cultivars were negligible at -10, -15 and -20°C. Results indicated that Pst mycelia inside green leaves can also be killed by low temperatures rather than through death of green leaves under low temperatures. The relationship of Pst survival in attached leaves with temperature and winter-hardiness was well described by logistic models. Further field evaluation is necessary to assess whether inclusion of other factors such as moisture and snow cover could improve the model performance in predicting Pst overwintering potential, and hence the epidemic in spring.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Estimated Pst DNA (dashed lines) and RNA (solid lines) from urediniospores subjected to three storage conditions over time.The concentration of DNA and RNA was measured using a spectrophotometer. Dashed lines with triangles, squares and circles represent DNA from dead urediniospores at ambient temperature, fresh urediniospores at ambient temperature and at -20°C, respectively. Solid lines with triangles, squares and circles represent RNA from dead urediniospores at ambient temperature, fresh urediniospores at ambient temperature and at -20°C, respectively. The experiment was done three times. The vertical bar for each treatment at each time point represents the standard deviation of the three mean values from three experiments; significant treatment differences were based on the pooled residual error in the repeated measurement ANOVA. The treatments with different letters on 4, 8, and 12 days means were significantly different at P = 0.05.
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pone.0130691.g001: Estimated Pst DNA (dashed lines) and RNA (solid lines) from urediniospores subjected to three storage conditions over time.The concentration of DNA and RNA was measured using a spectrophotometer. Dashed lines with triangles, squares and circles represent DNA from dead urediniospores at ambient temperature, fresh urediniospores at ambient temperature and at -20°C, respectively. Solid lines with triangles, squares and circles represent RNA from dead urediniospores at ambient temperature, fresh urediniospores at ambient temperature and at -20°C, respectively. The experiment was done three times. The vertical bar for each treatment at each time point represents the standard deviation of the three mean values from three experiments; significant treatment differences were based on the pooled residual error in the repeated measurement ANOVA. The treatments with different letters on 4, 8, and 12 days means were significantly different at P = 0.05.

Mentions: There were significant differences between DNA and RNA concentrations in three storage conditions (P < 0.001). The difference resulted primarily from large variation in RNA concentration over time (Fig 1). Compared with RNA, DNA concentration remained relatively stable over time (Fig 1). DNA integrity did not change much with time for all conditions (Fig 2A–2D). The 28S, 18S, 5.8S and 5S RNA were intact on day 0 (Fig 2E), but considerably degraded on day 4 for dead urediniospores (Fig 2F lane 1) with both 28S and 18S almost totally degraded on day 8 (Fig 2G lane 1). RNA extracted from viable urediniospores showed slight degradation on both day 4 and 8 (Fig 2F–2G lane 2). On day 12, RNA from viable urediniospores kept at ambient temperatures degraded more severely than that from urediniospores stored at -20°C (Fig 2H lane 2–3). The bands for 28S and 18S were clear for urediniospores stored at -20°C on all assessment days (Fig 2E–2H lane 3).


Effect of Low Temperature and Wheat Winter-Hardiness on Survival of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici under Controlled Conditions.

Ma L, Qiao J, Kong X, Zou Y, Xu X, Chen X, Hu X - PLoS ONE (2015)

Estimated Pst DNA (dashed lines) and RNA (solid lines) from urediniospores subjected to three storage conditions over time.The concentration of DNA and RNA was measured using a spectrophotometer. Dashed lines with triangles, squares and circles represent DNA from dead urediniospores at ambient temperature, fresh urediniospores at ambient temperature and at -20°C, respectively. Solid lines with triangles, squares and circles represent RNA from dead urediniospores at ambient temperature, fresh urediniospores at ambient temperature and at -20°C, respectively. The experiment was done three times. The vertical bar for each treatment at each time point represents the standard deviation of the three mean values from three experiments; significant treatment differences were based on the pooled residual error in the repeated measurement ANOVA. The treatments with different letters on 4, 8, and 12 days means were significantly different at P = 0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4470655&req=5

pone.0130691.g001: Estimated Pst DNA (dashed lines) and RNA (solid lines) from urediniospores subjected to three storage conditions over time.The concentration of DNA and RNA was measured using a spectrophotometer. Dashed lines with triangles, squares and circles represent DNA from dead urediniospores at ambient temperature, fresh urediniospores at ambient temperature and at -20°C, respectively. Solid lines with triangles, squares and circles represent RNA from dead urediniospores at ambient temperature, fresh urediniospores at ambient temperature and at -20°C, respectively. The experiment was done three times. The vertical bar for each treatment at each time point represents the standard deviation of the three mean values from three experiments; significant treatment differences were based on the pooled residual error in the repeated measurement ANOVA. The treatments with different letters on 4, 8, and 12 days means were significantly different at P = 0.05.
Mentions: There were significant differences between DNA and RNA concentrations in three storage conditions (P < 0.001). The difference resulted primarily from large variation in RNA concentration over time (Fig 1). Compared with RNA, DNA concentration remained relatively stable over time (Fig 1). DNA integrity did not change much with time for all conditions (Fig 2A–2D). The 28S, 18S, 5.8S and 5S RNA were intact on day 0 (Fig 2E), but considerably degraded on day 4 for dead urediniospores (Fig 2F lane 1) with both 28S and 18S almost totally degraded on day 8 (Fig 2G lane 1). RNA extracted from viable urediniospores showed slight degradation on both day 4 and 8 (Fig 2F–2G lane 2). On day 12, RNA from viable urediniospores kept at ambient temperatures degraded more severely than that from urediniospores stored at -20°C (Fig 2H lane 2–3). The bands for 28S and 18S were clear for urediniospores stored at -20°C on all assessment days (Fig 2E–2H lane 3).

Bottom Line: The percentage of Pst biomass that was viable in detached and attached leaves under low temperatures decreased over time.The survival of Pst in cultivars with strong winter-hardiness at 0°C and -5°C was greater than those with weak winter-hardiness.Further field evaluation is necessary to assess whether inclusion of other factors such as moisture and snow cover could improve the model performance in predicting Pst overwintering potential, and hence the epidemic in spring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A&F University, Taicheng Road 3, Yangling 712100, China.

ABSTRACT
Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most important diseases of wheat worldwide. Understanding the survival of Pst during the overwintering period is critical for predicting Pst epidemics in the spring. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) methods quantifying Pst DNA and RNA (cDNA) were developed and compared for the ability to quantify viable Pst in leaf tissues. Both qPCR of DNA and RNA can provide reliable measurement of viable Pst in plant tissues prior to the late sporulation stage for which qPCR of DNA gave a much higher estimate of fungal biomass than qPCR of RNA. The percentage of Pst biomass that was viable in detached and attached leaves under low temperatures decreased over time. Pst survived longer on attached leaves than on detached leaves. The survival of Pst in cultivars with strong winter-hardiness at 0°C and -5°C was greater than those with weak winter-hardiness. However, such differences in Pst survival among cultivars were negligible at -10, -15 and -20°C. Results indicated that Pst mycelia inside green leaves can also be killed by low temperatures rather than through death of green leaves under low temperatures. The relationship of Pst survival in attached leaves with temperature and winter-hardiness was well described by logistic models. Further field evaluation is necessary to assess whether inclusion of other factors such as moisture and snow cover could improve the model performance in predicting Pst overwintering potential, and hence the epidemic in spring.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus