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Effects of Aesthetic Chills on a Cardiac Signature of Emotionality.

Sumpf M, Jentschke S, Koelsch S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Previous studies have shown that a cardiac signature of emotionality (referred to as EK, which can be computed from the standard 12 lead electrocardiogram, ECG), predicts inter-individual differences in the tendency to experience and express positive emotion.EK values, as well as heart rate, increased significantly during moments of peak positive emotion accompanied by piloerection.These results are the first to provide evidence for an influence of momentary psychological state on a cardiac signature of emotional personality (as reflected in EK values).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cluster "Languages of Emotion", Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous studies have shown that a cardiac signature of emotionality (referred to as EK, which can be computed from the standard 12 lead electrocardiogram, ECG), predicts inter-individual differences in the tendency to experience and express positive emotion. Here, we investigated whether EK values can be transiently modulated during stimulation with participant-selected music pieces and film scenes that elicit strongly positive emotion.

Methodology/principal findings: The phenomenon of aesthetic chills, as indicated by measurable piloerection on the forearm, was used to accurately locate moments of peak emotional responses during stimulation. From 58 healthy participants, continuous EK values, heart rate, and respiratory frequency were recorded during stimulation with film scenes and music pieces, and were related to the aesthetic chills. EK values, as well as heart rate, increased significantly during moments of peak positive emotion accompanied by piloerection.

Conclusions/significance: These results are the first to provide evidence for an influence of momentary psychological state on a cardiac signature of emotional personality (as reflected in EK values). The possibility to modulate ECG amplitude signatures via stimulation with emotionally significant music pieces and film scenes opens up new perspectives for the use of emotional peak experiences in the therapy of disorders characterized by flattened emotionality, such as depression or schizoid personality disorder.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Time course of the chill response with piloerection (left column) and without piloerection (right column), 15 seconds before and after chill/piloerection onset (= 0s).The first ten seconds of each period (-15 to -5 s period before piloerection onset) were considered as the baseline, and their mean value was subtracted from the entire passages (resulting in a zero baseline, depicted by the dotted line). The solid line depicts the response of subjects who experienced piloerection/chills. The dashed line depicts the data of subjects who did not experience piloerection/chills in the same stimulus passages. Black dots mark significant deviations from zero/baseline. Ek = emotional index Eκ, HR = heart rate, RF = respiratory frequency.
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pone.0130117.g002: Time course of the chill response with piloerection (left column) and without piloerection (right column), 15 seconds before and after chill/piloerection onset (= 0s).The first ten seconds of each period (-15 to -5 s period before piloerection onset) were considered as the baseline, and their mean value was subtracted from the entire passages (resulting in a zero baseline, depicted by the dotted line). The solid line depicts the response of subjects who experienced piloerection/chills. The dashed line depicts the data of subjects who did not experience piloerection/chills in the same stimulus passages. Black dots mark significant deviations from zero/baseline. Ek = emotional index Eκ, HR = heart rate, RF = respiratory frequency.

Mentions: Music and film stimuli were pooled in the following analyses, because effects of separate stimulus types (music or film) were, albeit descriptively similar to the effects found when pooling them, mostly not significantly different from zero. Fig 2 shows the physiological responses to chills with piloerection (left column) and chills without piloerection (right column), compared to the physiological activity of the matched partner subjects (who did not have chills nor piloerection during the same musical or film passage). Fig 2a shows the time course of normalized Eκ values, Fig 2b shows the normalized heart rate, and Fig 2c shows the normalized ECG-derived respiratory frequency.


Effects of Aesthetic Chills on a Cardiac Signature of Emotionality.

Sumpf M, Jentschke S, Koelsch S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Time course of the chill response with piloerection (left column) and without piloerection (right column), 15 seconds before and after chill/piloerection onset (= 0s).The first ten seconds of each period (-15 to -5 s period before piloerection onset) were considered as the baseline, and their mean value was subtracted from the entire passages (resulting in a zero baseline, depicted by the dotted line). The solid line depicts the response of subjects who experienced piloerection/chills. The dashed line depicts the data of subjects who did not experience piloerection/chills in the same stimulus passages. Black dots mark significant deviations from zero/baseline. Ek = emotional index Eκ, HR = heart rate, RF = respiratory frequency.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4470584&req=5

pone.0130117.g002: Time course of the chill response with piloerection (left column) and without piloerection (right column), 15 seconds before and after chill/piloerection onset (= 0s).The first ten seconds of each period (-15 to -5 s period before piloerection onset) were considered as the baseline, and their mean value was subtracted from the entire passages (resulting in a zero baseline, depicted by the dotted line). The solid line depicts the response of subjects who experienced piloerection/chills. The dashed line depicts the data of subjects who did not experience piloerection/chills in the same stimulus passages. Black dots mark significant deviations from zero/baseline. Ek = emotional index Eκ, HR = heart rate, RF = respiratory frequency.
Mentions: Music and film stimuli were pooled in the following analyses, because effects of separate stimulus types (music or film) were, albeit descriptively similar to the effects found when pooling them, mostly not significantly different from zero. Fig 2 shows the physiological responses to chills with piloerection (left column) and chills without piloerection (right column), compared to the physiological activity of the matched partner subjects (who did not have chills nor piloerection during the same musical or film passage). Fig 2a shows the time course of normalized Eκ values, Fig 2b shows the normalized heart rate, and Fig 2c shows the normalized ECG-derived respiratory frequency.

Bottom Line: Previous studies have shown that a cardiac signature of emotionality (referred to as EK, which can be computed from the standard 12 lead electrocardiogram, ECG), predicts inter-individual differences in the tendency to experience and express positive emotion.EK values, as well as heart rate, increased significantly during moments of peak positive emotion accompanied by piloerection.These results are the first to provide evidence for an influence of momentary psychological state on a cardiac signature of emotional personality (as reflected in EK values).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cluster "Languages of Emotion", Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous studies have shown that a cardiac signature of emotionality (referred to as EK, which can be computed from the standard 12 lead electrocardiogram, ECG), predicts inter-individual differences in the tendency to experience and express positive emotion. Here, we investigated whether EK values can be transiently modulated during stimulation with participant-selected music pieces and film scenes that elicit strongly positive emotion.

Methodology/principal findings: The phenomenon of aesthetic chills, as indicated by measurable piloerection on the forearm, was used to accurately locate moments of peak emotional responses during stimulation. From 58 healthy participants, continuous EK values, heart rate, and respiratory frequency were recorded during stimulation with film scenes and music pieces, and were related to the aesthetic chills. EK values, as well as heart rate, increased significantly during moments of peak positive emotion accompanied by piloerection.

Conclusions/significance: These results are the first to provide evidence for an influence of momentary psychological state on a cardiac signature of emotional personality (as reflected in EK values). The possibility to modulate ECG amplitude signatures via stimulation with emotionally significant music pieces and film scenes opens up new perspectives for the use of emotional peak experiences in the therapy of disorders characterized by flattened emotionality, such as depression or schizoid personality disorder.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus