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The Role of an Integrated Multidisciplinary Clinic in the Management of Patients with Cutaneous Lymphoma.

Tyler KH, Haverkos BM, Hastings J, Hu E, Philips R, Gru AA, Welliver MX, Mishra A, Wong HK, Porcu P - Front Oncol (2015)

Bottom Line: The clinical benefit of a multidisciplinary clinic practice model has been well described in a variety of medical specialties and cancer types.However, the ideal implementation of an integrated multidisciplinary care program for translational research and education has not been well reported.We offer our perspective on this model as an efficient means for delivering patient care, a continuing education resource for referring physicians, a conduit for translational and clinical research, and an educational tool for medical students, house staff, and fellows.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Dermatology, The Ohio State University , Columbus, OH , USA.

ABSTRACT
The clinical benefit of a multidisciplinary clinic practice model has been well described in a variety of medical specialties and cancer types. It proves particularly valuable when an integrated team is needed to optimally manage patients with rare or complex neoplasms. However, the ideal implementation of an integrated multidisciplinary care program for translational research and education has not been well reported. Herein, we propose how a multimodality cutaneous lymphoma (CL) clinic model can optimally manage CL patients. We offer our perspective on this model as an efficient means for delivering patient care, a continuing education resource for referring physicians, a conduit for translational and clinical research, and an educational tool for medical students, house staff, and fellows.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Patients are referred from dermatology, medical oncology, and primary care. After patient referral, the patient revenue specialist requests outside pathology to be reviewed at our institution, requests medical records, and schedules appointment time. Our expert cutaneous hematopathologist reviews outside pathology prior to initial patient visit and then will on some occasions see the patient during first visit. Patients in need of financial assistance are handled by our patient assistance coordinator. The disease coordinator acts to ensure the initial patient referral is following a smooth transition. Then, at time of the patient visit, the medical assistant greets and escorts the patient into the room. The new patient is checked-in by the clinic nurse who collects basic symptoms, past-medical history, social history, family history, medication list, and allergies. The patient is then seen by medical students/residents and/or our clinic fellow/NP. Following a detailed discussion by the NP/fellow, an expert cutaneous lymphoma dermatologist and hematologist/oncologist jointly complete the visit and finalize the plan. Our pharmacist is always available for further questions on new medications and always counsels patients who are about to undergo new chemotherapy. The initial patient visit is completed by our research coordinator(s) who consent patients for our lymphoma registry and tissue repository. After patient visit and discharge, the multimodality team continues to work together to provide follow up care.
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Figure 1: Patients are referred from dermatology, medical oncology, and primary care. After patient referral, the patient revenue specialist requests outside pathology to be reviewed at our institution, requests medical records, and schedules appointment time. Our expert cutaneous hematopathologist reviews outside pathology prior to initial patient visit and then will on some occasions see the patient during first visit. Patients in need of financial assistance are handled by our patient assistance coordinator. The disease coordinator acts to ensure the initial patient referral is following a smooth transition. Then, at time of the patient visit, the medical assistant greets and escorts the patient into the room. The new patient is checked-in by the clinic nurse who collects basic symptoms, past-medical history, social history, family history, medication list, and allergies. The patient is then seen by medical students/residents and/or our clinic fellow/NP. Following a detailed discussion by the NP/fellow, an expert cutaneous lymphoma dermatologist and hematologist/oncologist jointly complete the visit and finalize the plan. Our pharmacist is always available for further questions on new medications and always counsels patients who are about to undergo new chemotherapy. The initial patient visit is completed by our research coordinator(s) who consent patients for our lymphoma registry and tissue repository. After patient visit and discharge, the multimodality team continues to work together to provide follow up care.

Mentions: Patients are referred to a centralized lymphoma scheduling office, whose staff is trained to triage patients to the MCLC, located at the James Cancer Hospital of the OSUCCC (Figure 1 and Table 1). At intake, research coordinators consent patients for an IRB-approved lymphoma database and biorepository; all archived samples are therefore clinically annotated. The dermatologist and hematologist–oncologist see the patient together, collaborating to formulate the assessment and plan and jointly addressing all questions and concerns. A clinical pharmacist advises the patients on drugs prescribed during the visit. A patient assistance coordinator ensures the patients’ access to prescribed treatments. The MCLC nurse provides patients with an after-visit summary, including contact information for all resources, team members, and educational tools. In all cases, biopsies are reviewed by an expert CL pathologist. Extra-corporeal photopheresis (ECP), radiation therapy (RT), and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) are closely coordinated with our colleagues. Patient satisfaction data are collected after each visit.


The Role of an Integrated Multidisciplinary Clinic in the Management of Patients with Cutaneous Lymphoma.

Tyler KH, Haverkos BM, Hastings J, Hu E, Philips R, Gru AA, Welliver MX, Mishra A, Wong HK, Porcu P - Front Oncol (2015)

Patients are referred from dermatology, medical oncology, and primary care. After patient referral, the patient revenue specialist requests outside pathology to be reviewed at our institution, requests medical records, and schedules appointment time. Our expert cutaneous hematopathologist reviews outside pathology prior to initial patient visit and then will on some occasions see the patient during first visit. Patients in need of financial assistance are handled by our patient assistance coordinator. The disease coordinator acts to ensure the initial patient referral is following a smooth transition. Then, at time of the patient visit, the medical assistant greets and escorts the patient into the room. The new patient is checked-in by the clinic nurse who collects basic symptoms, past-medical history, social history, family history, medication list, and allergies. The patient is then seen by medical students/residents and/or our clinic fellow/NP. Following a detailed discussion by the NP/fellow, an expert cutaneous lymphoma dermatologist and hematologist/oncologist jointly complete the visit and finalize the plan. Our pharmacist is always available for further questions on new medications and always counsels patients who are about to undergo new chemotherapy. The initial patient visit is completed by our research coordinator(s) who consent patients for our lymphoma registry and tissue repository. After patient visit and discharge, the multimodality team continues to work together to provide follow up care.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4470273&req=5

Figure 1: Patients are referred from dermatology, medical oncology, and primary care. After patient referral, the patient revenue specialist requests outside pathology to be reviewed at our institution, requests medical records, and schedules appointment time. Our expert cutaneous hematopathologist reviews outside pathology prior to initial patient visit and then will on some occasions see the patient during first visit. Patients in need of financial assistance are handled by our patient assistance coordinator. The disease coordinator acts to ensure the initial patient referral is following a smooth transition. Then, at time of the patient visit, the medical assistant greets and escorts the patient into the room. The new patient is checked-in by the clinic nurse who collects basic symptoms, past-medical history, social history, family history, medication list, and allergies. The patient is then seen by medical students/residents and/or our clinic fellow/NP. Following a detailed discussion by the NP/fellow, an expert cutaneous lymphoma dermatologist and hematologist/oncologist jointly complete the visit and finalize the plan. Our pharmacist is always available for further questions on new medications and always counsels patients who are about to undergo new chemotherapy. The initial patient visit is completed by our research coordinator(s) who consent patients for our lymphoma registry and tissue repository. After patient visit and discharge, the multimodality team continues to work together to provide follow up care.
Mentions: Patients are referred to a centralized lymphoma scheduling office, whose staff is trained to triage patients to the MCLC, located at the James Cancer Hospital of the OSUCCC (Figure 1 and Table 1). At intake, research coordinators consent patients for an IRB-approved lymphoma database and biorepository; all archived samples are therefore clinically annotated. The dermatologist and hematologist–oncologist see the patient together, collaborating to formulate the assessment and plan and jointly addressing all questions and concerns. A clinical pharmacist advises the patients on drugs prescribed during the visit. A patient assistance coordinator ensures the patients’ access to prescribed treatments. The MCLC nurse provides patients with an after-visit summary, including contact information for all resources, team members, and educational tools. In all cases, biopsies are reviewed by an expert CL pathologist. Extra-corporeal photopheresis (ECP), radiation therapy (RT), and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) are closely coordinated with our colleagues. Patient satisfaction data are collected after each visit.

Bottom Line: The clinical benefit of a multidisciplinary clinic practice model has been well described in a variety of medical specialties and cancer types.However, the ideal implementation of an integrated multidisciplinary care program for translational research and education has not been well reported.We offer our perspective on this model as an efficient means for delivering patient care, a continuing education resource for referring physicians, a conduit for translational and clinical research, and an educational tool for medical students, house staff, and fellows.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Dermatology, The Ohio State University , Columbus, OH , USA.

ABSTRACT
The clinical benefit of a multidisciplinary clinic practice model has been well described in a variety of medical specialties and cancer types. It proves particularly valuable when an integrated team is needed to optimally manage patients with rare or complex neoplasms. However, the ideal implementation of an integrated multidisciplinary care program for translational research and education has not been well reported. Herein, we propose how a multimodality cutaneous lymphoma (CL) clinic model can optimally manage CL patients. We offer our perspective on this model as an efficient means for delivering patient care, a continuing education resource for referring physicians, a conduit for translational and clinical research, and an educational tool for medical students, house staff, and fellows.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus