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In Vitro Ability of a Novel Nanohydroxyapatite Oral Rinse to Occlude Dentine Tubules.

Hill RG, Chen X, Gillam DG - Int J Dent (2015)

Bottom Line: Most of the oral rinses failed to adequately cover the dentine surface apart from the nHa oral rinse.Conclusions.Although the novel nHA oral rinse demonstrated the ability to occlude the dentine tubules and reduce the fluid flow measurements, some of the other oral rinses appeared to demonstrate a statistically significant reduction in fluid flow through the dentine disc, in particular the arginine/PVM/MA copolymer oral rinse.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dental Physical Sciences, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), London E1 4NS, UK.

ABSTRACT
Objectives. The aim of the study was to investigate the ability of a novel nanohydroxyapatite (nHA) desensitizing oral rinse to occlude dentine tubules compared to selected commercially available desensitizing oral rinses. Methods. 25 caries-free extracted molars were sectioned into 1 mm thick dentine discs. The dentine discs (n = 25) were etched with 6% citric acid for 2 minutes and rinsed with distilled water, prior to a 30-second application of test and control oral rinses. Evaluation was by (1) Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of the dentine surface and (2) fluid flow measurements through a dentine disc. Results. Most of the oral rinses failed to adequately cover the dentine surface apart from the nHa oral rinse. However the hydroxyapatite, 1.4% potassium oxalate, and arginine/PVM/MA copolymer oral rinses, appeared to be relatively more effective than the nHA test and negative control rinses (potassium nitrate) in relation to a reduction in fluid flow measurements. Conclusions. Although the novel nHA oral rinse demonstrated the ability to occlude the dentine tubules and reduce the fluid flow measurements, some of the other oral rinses appeared to demonstrate a statistically significant reduction in fluid flow through the dentine disc, in particular the arginine/PVM/MA copolymer oral rinse.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

SEM images of dentine tubules treated with nHA oral rinse (UltraDEX HA Recalcifying oral rinse), before treatment (a) and after treatment (b).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: SEM images of dentine tubules treated with nHA oral rinse (UltraDEX HA Recalcifying oral rinse), before treatment (a) and after treatment (b).

Mentions: Figures 1–5 show the SEMs of the dentine discs before and after treatment with the test and control oral rinses. When treated with the nHA oral rinse for 30 seconds a number of the dentine tubules were occluded by the HA particles as observed in Figure 1. The HA particles appear to cover the dentine surface of the dentine disc as well as penetrate into the dentine tubules. The zinc substituted HA oral rinse (BioRepair MicroRepair Mouthwash) (Figure 2) however provided a less dense particle coverage and occlusion of the dentine tubules compared to the nHA oral rinse (Figure 1); this may have been as a consequence of the much lower HA concentration in this oral rinse. In comparison, the other oral rinse formulations do not appear to demonstrate any clear evidence of occlusion of the dentine surface compared with the etched control (before treatment) (Figures 3–5).


In Vitro Ability of a Novel Nanohydroxyapatite Oral Rinse to Occlude Dentine Tubules.

Hill RG, Chen X, Gillam DG - Int J Dent (2015)

SEM images of dentine tubules treated with nHA oral rinse (UltraDEX HA Recalcifying oral rinse), before treatment (a) and after treatment (b).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4469758&req=5

fig1: SEM images of dentine tubules treated with nHA oral rinse (UltraDEX HA Recalcifying oral rinse), before treatment (a) and after treatment (b).
Mentions: Figures 1–5 show the SEMs of the dentine discs before and after treatment with the test and control oral rinses. When treated with the nHA oral rinse for 30 seconds a number of the dentine tubules were occluded by the HA particles as observed in Figure 1. The HA particles appear to cover the dentine surface of the dentine disc as well as penetrate into the dentine tubules. The zinc substituted HA oral rinse (BioRepair MicroRepair Mouthwash) (Figure 2) however provided a less dense particle coverage and occlusion of the dentine tubules compared to the nHA oral rinse (Figure 1); this may have been as a consequence of the much lower HA concentration in this oral rinse. In comparison, the other oral rinse formulations do not appear to demonstrate any clear evidence of occlusion of the dentine surface compared with the etched control (before treatment) (Figures 3–5).

Bottom Line: Most of the oral rinses failed to adequately cover the dentine surface apart from the nHa oral rinse.Conclusions.Although the novel nHA oral rinse demonstrated the ability to occlude the dentine tubules and reduce the fluid flow measurements, some of the other oral rinses appeared to demonstrate a statistically significant reduction in fluid flow through the dentine disc, in particular the arginine/PVM/MA copolymer oral rinse.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dental Physical Sciences, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), London E1 4NS, UK.

ABSTRACT
Objectives. The aim of the study was to investigate the ability of a novel nanohydroxyapatite (nHA) desensitizing oral rinse to occlude dentine tubules compared to selected commercially available desensitizing oral rinses. Methods. 25 caries-free extracted molars were sectioned into 1 mm thick dentine discs. The dentine discs (n = 25) were etched with 6% citric acid for 2 minutes and rinsed with distilled water, prior to a 30-second application of test and control oral rinses. Evaluation was by (1) Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of the dentine surface and (2) fluid flow measurements through a dentine disc. Results. Most of the oral rinses failed to adequately cover the dentine surface apart from the nHa oral rinse. However the hydroxyapatite, 1.4% potassium oxalate, and arginine/PVM/MA copolymer oral rinses, appeared to be relatively more effective than the nHA test and negative control rinses (potassium nitrate) in relation to a reduction in fluid flow measurements. Conclusions. Although the novel nHA oral rinse demonstrated the ability to occlude the dentine tubules and reduce the fluid flow measurements, some of the other oral rinses appeared to demonstrate a statistically significant reduction in fluid flow through the dentine disc, in particular the arginine/PVM/MA copolymer oral rinse.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus