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Barratt Impulsivity and Neural Regulation of Physiological Arousal.

Zhang S, Hu S, Hu J, Wu PL, Chao HH, Li CS - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: When men (n = 14) and women (n = 12) were examined separately, however, there was evidence suggesting association between impulsivity and vmPFC regulation of arousal only in women.Together, these findings confirmed the link between Barratt impulsivity and heightened arousal to salient stimuli in both genders and suggested the neural bases of altered regulation of arousal in impulsive women.More research is needed to explore the neural processes of arousal regulation in impulsive individuals and in clinical conditions that implicate poor impulse control.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06519, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Theories of personality have posited an increased arousal response to external stimulation in impulsive individuals. However, there is a dearth of studies addressing the neural basis of this association.

Methods: We recorded skin conductance in 26 individuals who were assessed with Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and performed a stop signal task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging data were processed and modeled with Statistical Parametric Mapping. We used linear regressions to examine correlations between impulsivity and skin conductance response (SCR) to salient events, identify the neural substrates of arousal regulation, and examine the relationship between the regulatory mechanism and impulsivity.

Results: Across subjects, higher impulsivity is associated with greater SCR to stop trials. Activity of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) negatively correlated to and Granger caused skin conductance time course. Furthermore, higher impulsivity is associated with a lesser strength of Granger causality of vmPFC activity on skin conductance, consistent with diminished control of physiological arousal to external stimulation. When men (n = 14) and women (n = 12) were examined separately, however, there was evidence suggesting association between impulsivity and vmPFC regulation of arousal only in women.

Conclusions: Together, these findings confirmed the link between Barratt impulsivity and heightened arousal to salient stimuli in both genders and suggested the neural bases of altered regulation of arousal in impulsive women. More research is needed to explore the neural processes of arousal regulation in impulsive individuals and in clinical conditions that implicate poor impulse control.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Brain region negatively correlated with skin conductance.The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC, x = 2, y = 25, z = -14) showed significant negative correlation with skin conductance across 26 subjects (peak voxel p < 0.001 and cluster level p < 0.05, FWE corrected).
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pone.0129139.g003: Brain region negatively correlated with skin conductance.The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC, x = 2, y = 25, z = -14) showed significant negative correlation with skin conductance across 26 subjects (peak voxel p < 0.001 and cluster level p < 0.05, FWE corrected).

Mentions: As expected, we observed that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC, x = 2, y = 25, z = -14) showed significant (peak voxel p < 0.001 and cluster level p < 0.05, FWE corrected) negative correlation with skin conductance (Fig 3).


Barratt Impulsivity and Neural Regulation of Physiological Arousal.

Zhang S, Hu S, Hu J, Wu PL, Chao HH, Li CS - PLoS ONE (2015)

Brain region negatively correlated with skin conductance.The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC, x = 2, y = 25, z = -14) showed significant negative correlation with skin conductance across 26 subjects (peak voxel p < 0.001 and cluster level p < 0.05, FWE corrected).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4469608&req=5

pone.0129139.g003: Brain region negatively correlated with skin conductance.The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC, x = 2, y = 25, z = -14) showed significant negative correlation with skin conductance across 26 subjects (peak voxel p < 0.001 and cluster level p < 0.05, FWE corrected).
Mentions: As expected, we observed that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC, x = 2, y = 25, z = -14) showed significant (peak voxel p < 0.001 and cluster level p < 0.05, FWE corrected) negative correlation with skin conductance (Fig 3).

Bottom Line: When men (n = 14) and women (n = 12) were examined separately, however, there was evidence suggesting association between impulsivity and vmPFC regulation of arousal only in women.Together, these findings confirmed the link between Barratt impulsivity and heightened arousal to salient stimuli in both genders and suggested the neural bases of altered regulation of arousal in impulsive women.More research is needed to explore the neural processes of arousal regulation in impulsive individuals and in clinical conditions that implicate poor impulse control.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06519, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Theories of personality have posited an increased arousal response to external stimulation in impulsive individuals. However, there is a dearth of studies addressing the neural basis of this association.

Methods: We recorded skin conductance in 26 individuals who were assessed with Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) and performed a stop signal task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging data were processed and modeled with Statistical Parametric Mapping. We used linear regressions to examine correlations between impulsivity and skin conductance response (SCR) to salient events, identify the neural substrates of arousal regulation, and examine the relationship between the regulatory mechanism and impulsivity.

Results: Across subjects, higher impulsivity is associated with greater SCR to stop trials. Activity of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) negatively correlated to and Granger caused skin conductance time course. Furthermore, higher impulsivity is associated with a lesser strength of Granger causality of vmPFC activity on skin conductance, consistent with diminished control of physiological arousal to external stimulation. When men (n = 14) and women (n = 12) were examined separately, however, there was evidence suggesting association between impulsivity and vmPFC regulation of arousal only in women.

Conclusions: Together, these findings confirmed the link between Barratt impulsivity and heightened arousal to salient stimuli in both genders and suggested the neural bases of altered regulation of arousal in impulsive women. More research is needed to explore the neural processes of arousal regulation in impulsive individuals and in clinical conditions that implicate poor impulse control.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus