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Large Scale Relationship between Aquatic Insect Traits and Climate.

Bhowmik AK, Schäfer RB - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We compared the responses of the assumed climate-associated traits from six grouping features to 35 bioclimatic indices (~18 km resolution) for five insect orders (Diptera, Ephemeroptera, Odonata, Plecoptera and Trichoptera), evaluated their potential for changing distribution pattern under future climate change and identified the most influential bioclimatic indices.We quantified the variability and spatial autocorrelation in the traits and orders that are associated with the combined and individual bioclimatic indices.Traits of temperature preference grouping feature that are the products of several other underlying climate-associated traits, and the insect order Ephemeroptera exhibited the strongest response to the bioclimatic indices as well as the highest potential for changing distribution pattern.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Quantitative Landscape Ecology, Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of Koblenz-Landau, Landau in der Pfalz, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Climate is the predominant environmental driver of freshwater assemblage pattern on large spatial scales, and traits of freshwater organisms have shown considerable potential to identify impacts of climate change. Although several studies suggest traits that may indicate vulnerability to climate change, the empirical relationship between freshwater assemblage trait composition and climate has been rarely examined on large scales. We compared the responses of the assumed climate-associated traits from six grouping features to 35 bioclimatic indices (~18 km resolution) for five insect orders (Diptera, Ephemeroptera, Odonata, Plecoptera and Trichoptera), evaluated their potential for changing distribution pattern under future climate change and identified the most influential bioclimatic indices. The data comprised 782 species and 395 genera sampled in 4,752 stream sites during 2006 and 2007 in Germany (~357,000 km² spatial extent). We quantified the variability and spatial autocorrelation in the traits and orders that are associated with the combined and individual bioclimatic indices. Traits of temperature preference grouping feature that are the products of several other underlying climate-associated traits, and the insect order Ephemeroptera exhibited the strongest response to the bioclimatic indices as well as the highest potential for changing distribution pattern. Regarding individual traits, insects in general and ephemeropterans preferring very cold temperature showed the highest response, and the insects preferring cold and trichopterans preferring moderate temperature showed the highest potential for changing distribution. We showed that the seasonal radiation and moisture are the most influential bioclimatic aspects, and thus changes in these aspects may affect the most responsive traits and orders and drive a change in their spatial distribution pattern. Our findings support the development of trait-based metrics to predict and detect climate-related changes of freshwater assemblages.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Annual averaged abundance weighted traits across 4,752 stream sites in Germany for the biological traits of the full data.The figure sub-captions and panel captions indicate names of grouping features and traits, respectively. The gray dots indicate the zero abundance, i.e. trait absence.
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pone.0130025.g003: Annual averaged abundance weighted traits across 4,752 stream sites in Germany for the biological traits of the full data.The figure sub-captions and panel captions indicate names of grouping features and traits, respectively. The gray dots indicate the zero abundance, i.e. trait absence.

Mentions: The biomonitoring data were linked to the trait data using the codes of “The development and testing of an integrated assessment system for the ecological quality of streams and rivers throughout Europe using benthic macroinvertebrates” (AQEM) project to avoid discrepancies in naming conventions [38]. Each of the species was assigned with the traits using their corresponding percentage membership states that were multiplied with the absolute abundance classes of the species for a site to compute relative abundance classes for the traits (Fig 2). To assign trait information to genera, we calculated the median of the related species level information following Schmidt-Kloiber and Nijboer [39] except for maximal body size where genus level information were available in the Tachet database for all genera. Subsequently, the assemblage trait composition, i.e. abundance weighted trait (AWT) was calculated following the procedure described in [40] and as outlined in Fig 2. The AWT was calculated as a measure of assemblage trait composition because it is the most frequently used metric to assess the relationship between assemblage traits and environmental variables [41,42]. Note that we use the term assemblage trait composition to improve readability, although the assemblage data was restricted to aquatic insects, and hence does not represent the complete macroinvertebrate assemblage. The calculation resulted in annual averaged abundance-weighted traits (AWT) for each insect order (Fig A in S1 File) and for the combined (full) data (Figs 3 and 4) for each stream site. The calculation was omitted for the dispersal capacity of ephemeropterans and plecopterans because the grouping feature consisted of only one trait (low dispersal). However, they were included in the calculation for the full data.


Large Scale Relationship between Aquatic Insect Traits and Climate.

Bhowmik AK, Schäfer RB - PLoS ONE (2015)

Annual averaged abundance weighted traits across 4,752 stream sites in Germany for the biological traits of the full data.The figure sub-captions and panel captions indicate names of grouping features and traits, respectively. The gray dots indicate the zero abundance, i.e. trait absence.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4469582&req=5

pone.0130025.g003: Annual averaged abundance weighted traits across 4,752 stream sites in Germany for the biological traits of the full data.The figure sub-captions and panel captions indicate names of grouping features and traits, respectively. The gray dots indicate the zero abundance, i.e. trait absence.
Mentions: The biomonitoring data were linked to the trait data using the codes of “The development and testing of an integrated assessment system for the ecological quality of streams and rivers throughout Europe using benthic macroinvertebrates” (AQEM) project to avoid discrepancies in naming conventions [38]. Each of the species was assigned with the traits using their corresponding percentage membership states that were multiplied with the absolute abundance classes of the species for a site to compute relative abundance classes for the traits (Fig 2). To assign trait information to genera, we calculated the median of the related species level information following Schmidt-Kloiber and Nijboer [39] except for maximal body size where genus level information were available in the Tachet database for all genera. Subsequently, the assemblage trait composition, i.e. abundance weighted trait (AWT) was calculated following the procedure described in [40] and as outlined in Fig 2. The AWT was calculated as a measure of assemblage trait composition because it is the most frequently used metric to assess the relationship between assemblage traits and environmental variables [41,42]. Note that we use the term assemblage trait composition to improve readability, although the assemblage data was restricted to aquatic insects, and hence does not represent the complete macroinvertebrate assemblage. The calculation resulted in annual averaged abundance-weighted traits (AWT) for each insect order (Fig A in S1 File) and for the combined (full) data (Figs 3 and 4) for each stream site. The calculation was omitted for the dispersal capacity of ephemeropterans and plecopterans because the grouping feature consisted of only one trait (low dispersal). However, they were included in the calculation for the full data.

Bottom Line: We compared the responses of the assumed climate-associated traits from six grouping features to 35 bioclimatic indices (~18 km resolution) for five insect orders (Diptera, Ephemeroptera, Odonata, Plecoptera and Trichoptera), evaluated their potential for changing distribution pattern under future climate change and identified the most influential bioclimatic indices.We quantified the variability and spatial autocorrelation in the traits and orders that are associated with the combined and individual bioclimatic indices.Traits of temperature preference grouping feature that are the products of several other underlying climate-associated traits, and the insect order Ephemeroptera exhibited the strongest response to the bioclimatic indices as well as the highest potential for changing distribution pattern.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Quantitative Landscape Ecology, Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of Koblenz-Landau, Landau in der Pfalz, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Climate is the predominant environmental driver of freshwater assemblage pattern on large spatial scales, and traits of freshwater organisms have shown considerable potential to identify impacts of climate change. Although several studies suggest traits that may indicate vulnerability to climate change, the empirical relationship between freshwater assemblage trait composition and climate has been rarely examined on large scales. We compared the responses of the assumed climate-associated traits from six grouping features to 35 bioclimatic indices (~18 km resolution) for five insect orders (Diptera, Ephemeroptera, Odonata, Plecoptera and Trichoptera), evaluated their potential for changing distribution pattern under future climate change and identified the most influential bioclimatic indices. The data comprised 782 species and 395 genera sampled in 4,752 stream sites during 2006 and 2007 in Germany (~357,000 km² spatial extent). We quantified the variability and spatial autocorrelation in the traits and orders that are associated with the combined and individual bioclimatic indices. Traits of temperature preference grouping feature that are the products of several other underlying climate-associated traits, and the insect order Ephemeroptera exhibited the strongest response to the bioclimatic indices as well as the highest potential for changing distribution pattern. Regarding individual traits, insects in general and ephemeropterans preferring very cold temperature showed the highest response, and the insects preferring cold and trichopterans preferring moderate temperature showed the highest potential for changing distribution. We showed that the seasonal radiation and moisture are the most influential bioclimatic aspects, and thus changes in these aspects may affect the most responsive traits and orders and drive a change in their spatial distribution pattern. Our findings support the development of trait-based metrics to predict and detect climate-related changes of freshwater assemblages.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus