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Ethnomedicinal plants used by traditional healers in Phatthalung Province, Peninsular Thailand.

Maneenoon K, Khuniad C, Teanuan Y, Saedan N, Prom-In S, Rukleng N, Kongpool W, Pinsook P, Wongwiwat W - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2015)

Bottom Line: Local names, medicinal uses, parts used, modes of preparation, and the relationship between ailments and tastes of medicinal plant species are presented.This research suggests that traditional healers are still considered important for public health among Thai communities and that many people trust the healing properties of medicinal plants.In the future, it is hoped that traditional Thai medicine will be promoted and therefore will help reduce national public health expense.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Traditional Thai Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, 90110, Thailand. katesarin.m@psu.ac.th.

ABSTRACT

Background: In rural communities of Thailand, traditional healers still play an important role in local health care systems even though modern medicine is easily accessible. Meanwhile, natural forests in Thailand which are important sources of materia medica are being greatly destroyed. This has led to an erosion of traditional Thai medicine. Furthermore, the concept of medicinal plant selection as medicine based on their tastes is still an important component of traditional Thai medicine, but no or little publications have been reported. Thus the aim of the present study is to collect ethnomedicinal data, medicinal plant tastes and relevant information from experienced traditional healers before they are lost.

Methods: An ethnobotanical survey was carried out to collect information from nine experienced traditional healers on the utilization of medicinal plants in Phatthalung Province, Peninsular Thailand. Data were obtained using semi-structured interviews and participant observations. Plant specimens were also collected and identified according to the plant taxonomic method.

Results: A total of 151 medicinal plants were documented and 98 of these are reported in the study. Local names, medicinal uses, parts used, modes of preparation, and the relationship between ailments and tastes of medicinal plant species are presented.

Conclusions: This research suggests that traditional healers are still considered important for public health among Thai communities and that many people trust the healing properties of medicinal plants. In the future, it is hoped that traditional Thai medicine will be promoted and therefore will help reduce national public health expense.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Habits of medicinal plants
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Fig4: Habits of medicinal plants

Mentions: The result of this study indicated that the majority of medicinal plants used by traditional healers are still harvested from the wild (Fig. 3). In the case of cultivated plants, the original habitats were wild and located far away from the traditional healers’ villages. For convenience, these medicinal plants were moved and planted in cultivated fields or home gardens and used whenever required. However, most traditional healers said that the current situation of medicinal plants is a concern. Some medicinal plant species have become rare or extinct because of overexploitation and continued deforestation. As a result, the shortage of medicinal plants has affected healing treatments. The result was in agreement with the study of Tabuti [7] and Wodah and Asase [8] who reported on the decrease of medicinal plants in northwest Ghana and Uganda. This study showed that shrubs were found to be the most used plants (48 species) followed by herbs (40 species), climbers (35 species) and trees (22 species) (Fig. 4). This result indicated that shrubs were common and easily harvested when compared to others. Furthermore, most of the study areas for this study were open areas suitable for shrub growing.Fig. 3


Ethnomedicinal plants used by traditional healers in Phatthalung Province, Peninsular Thailand.

Maneenoon K, Khuniad C, Teanuan Y, Saedan N, Prom-In S, Rukleng N, Kongpool W, Pinsook P, Wongwiwat W - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2015)

Habits of medicinal plants
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4469324&req=5

Fig4: Habits of medicinal plants
Mentions: The result of this study indicated that the majority of medicinal plants used by traditional healers are still harvested from the wild (Fig. 3). In the case of cultivated plants, the original habitats were wild and located far away from the traditional healers’ villages. For convenience, these medicinal plants were moved and planted in cultivated fields or home gardens and used whenever required. However, most traditional healers said that the current situation of medicinal plants is a concern. Some medicinal plant species have become rare or extinct because of overexploitation and continued deforestation. As a result, the shortage of medicinal plants has affected healing treatments. The result was in agreement with the study of Tabuti [7] and Wodah and Asase [8] who reported on the decrease of medicinal plants in northwest Ghana and Uganda. This study showed that shrubs were found to be the most used plants (48 species) followed by herbs (40 species), climbers (35 species) and trees (22 species) (Fig. 4). This result indicated that shrubs were common and easily harvested when compared to others. Furthermore, most of the study areas for this study were open areas suitable for shrub growing.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Local names, medicinal uses, parts used, modes of preparation, and the relationship between ailments and tastes of medicinal plant species are presented.This research suggests that traditional healers are still considered important for public health among Thai communities and that many people trust the healing properties of medicinal plants.In the future, it is hoped that traditional Thai medicine will be promoted and therefore will help reduce national public health expense.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Traditional Thai Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, 90110, Thailand. katesarin.m@psu.ac.th.

ABSTRACT

Background: In rural communities of Thailand, traditional healers still play an important role in local health care systems even though modern medicine is easily accessible. Meanwhile, natural forests in Thailand which are important sources of materia medica are being greatly destroyed. This has led to an erosion of traditional Thai medicine. Furthermore, the concept of medicinal plant selection as medicine based on their tastes is still an important component of traditional Thai medicine, but no or little publications have been reported. Thus the aim of the present study is to collect ethnomedicinal data, medicinal plant tastes and relevant information from experienced traditional healers before they are lost.

Methods: An ethnobotanical survey was carried out to collect information from nine experienced traditional healers on the utilization of medicinal plants in Phatthalung Province, Peninsular Thailand. Data were obtained using semi-structured interviews and participant observations. Plant specimens were also collected and identified according to the plant taxonomic method.

Results: A total of 151 medicinal plants were documented and 98 of these are reported in the study. Local names, medicinal uses, parts used, modes of preparation, and the relationship between ailments and tastes of medicinal plant species are presented.

Conclusions: This research suggests that traditional healers are still considered important for public health among Thai communities and that many people trust the healing properties of medicinal plants. In the future, it is hoped that traditional Thai medicine will be promoted and therefore will help reduce national public health expense.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus