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Differing Dynamics of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Coordination: Two-finger and Four-Finger Tapping Experiments.

Kodama K, Furuyama N, Inamura T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Some results did not agree with the HKB model predictions.First, from Experiment 1, no significant difference was observed in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase modes in the two finger condition.Second, from Experiment 2, no significant difference was found in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase mode in the four-finger condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Kanagawa University, 3-27-1, Rokkakubashi, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa-ken, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Finger-tapping experiments were conducted to examine whether the dynamics of intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems can be described equally by the Haken-Kelso-Bunz model, which describes inter-limb coordination dynamics. This article reports the results of finger-tapping experiments conducted in both systems. Two within-subject factors were investigated: the phase mode and the number of fingers. In the intrapersonal experiment (Experiment 1), the participants were asked to tap, paced by a gradually hastening auditory metronome, looking at their fingers moving, using the index finger in the two finger condition, or the index and middle finger in the four-finger condition. In the interpersonal experiment (Experiment 2), pairs of participants performed the task while each participant used the outside hand, tapping with the index finger in the two finger condition, or the index and middle finger in the four-finger condition. Some results did not agree with the HKB model predictions. First, from Experiment 1, no significant difference was observed in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase modes in the two finger condition. Second, from Experiment 2, no significant difference was found in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase mode in the four-finger condition. From these findings, different coordination dynamics were inferred between intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems against prediction from the previous studies. Results were discussed according to differences between intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems in the availability of perceptual information and the complexity in the interaction between limbs derived from a nested structure.

No MeSH data available.


Percentage of phase transition occurrence.Colors of bar indicate how many times the taps in the opposite phase mode repeated. From black (5 times), … to the lightest gray (2 times). 2f-in: two-finger in-phase condition, 2f-an: two-finger anti-phase condition, 4f-in: four-finger in-phase condition, 4f-an: four-finger anti-phase condition.
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pone.0129358.g004: Percentage of phase transition occurrence.Colors of bar indicate how many times the taps in the opposite phase mode repeated. From black (5 times), … to the lightest gray (2 times). 2f-in: two-finger in-phase condition, 2f-an: two-finger anti-phase condition, 4f-in: four-finger in-phase condition, 4f-an: four-finger anti-phase condition.

Mentions: Fig 4 presents the percentage of phase transition occurrence for each condition. In the two-finger condition, no transition was observed in the in-phase or anti-phase condition. For the four-finger condition, no transition was observed in the in-phase condition, but the transition occurred at 97.5% in the anti-phase condition. In summary, in the two-finger condition, no difference in the percentage of phase transition occurrence was found between two phase modes, whereas in the four-finger condition, the transition occurred more often in the anti-phase condition than in the in-phase condition. No transition was observed in the three conditions except for the four-finger anti-phase condition. Therefore, we conducted no statistical analysis of the percentage of phase transition occurrence for avoiding the flooring effect, i.e., the data without four fingers anti-phase condition were zero, and have no variance. Fig 4 also shows that the percentage of phase transition occurrence was robust even though the parameter, the number of times the taps in the opposite phase mode, changed from 2 to 5.


Differing Dynamics of Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Coordination: Two-finger and Four-Finger Tapping Experiments.

Kodama K, Furuyama N, Inamura T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Percentage of phase transition occurrence.Colors of bar indicate how many times the taps in the opposite phase mode repeated. From black (5 times), … to the lightest gray (2 times). 2f-in: two-finger in-phase condition, 2f-an: two-finger anti-phase condition, 4f-in: four-finger in-phase condition, 4f-an: four-finger anti-phase condition.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4466560&req=5

pone.0129358.g004: Percentage of phase transition occurrence.Colors of bar indicate how many times the taps in the opposite phase mode repeated. From black (5 times), … to the lightest gray (2 times). 2f-in: two-finger in-phase condition, 2f-an: two-finger anti-phase condition, 4f-in: four-finger in-phase condition, 4f-an: four-finger anti-phase condition.
Mentions: Fig 4 presents the percentage of phase transition occurrence for each condition. In the two-finger condition, no transition was observed in the in-phase or anti-phase condition. For the four-finger condition, no transition was observed in the in-phase condition, but the transition occurred at 97.5% in the anti-phase condition. In summary, in the two-finger condition, no difference in the percentage of phase transition occurrence was found between two phase modes, whereas in the four-finger condition, the transition occurred more often in the anti-phase condition than in the in-phase condition. No transition was observed in the three conditions except for the four-finger anti-phase condition. Therefore, we conducted no statistical analysis of the percentage of phase transition occurrence for avoiding the flooring effect, i.e., the data without four fingers anti-phase condition were zero, and have no variance. Fig 4 also shows that the percentage of phase transition occurrence was robust even though the parameter, the number of times the taps in the opposite phase mode, changed from 2 to 5.

Bottom Line: Some results did not agree with the HKB model predictions.First, from Experiment 1, no significant difference was observed in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase modes in the two finger condition.Second, from Experiment 2, no significant difference was found in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase mode in the four-finger condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Kanagawa University, 3-27-1, Rokkakubashi, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa-ken, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Finger-tapping experiments were conducted to examine whether the dynamics of intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems can be described equally by the Haken-Kelso-Bunz model, which describes inter-limb coordination dynamics. This article reports the results of finger-tapping experiments conducted in both systems. Two within-subject factors were investigated: the phase mode and the number of fingers. In the intrapersonal experiment (Experiment 1), the participants were asked to tap, paced by a gradually hastening auditory metronome, looking at their fingers moving, using the index finger in the two finger condition, or the index and middle finger in the four-finger condition. In the interpersonal experiment (Experiment 2), pairs of participants performed the task while each participant used the outside hand, tapping with the index finger in the two finger condition, or the index and middle finger in the four-finger condition. Some results did not agree with the HKB model predictions. First, from Experiment 1, no significant difference was observed in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase modes in the two finger condition. Second, from Experiment 2, no significant difference was found in the movement stability between the in-phase and anti-phase mode in the four-finger condition. From these findings, different coordination dynamics were inferred between intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems against prediction from the previous studies. Results were discussed according to differences between intrapersonal and interpersonal coordination systems in the availability of perceptual information and the complexity in the interaction between limbs derived from a nested structure.

No MeSH data available.