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Induction and Processing of the Radiation-Induced Gamma-H2AX Signal and Its Link to the Underlying Pattern of DSB: A Combined Experimental and Modelling Study.

Tommasino F, Friedrich T, Jakob B, Meyer B, Durante M, Scholz M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The study was performed by quantitative flow cytometry measurements, since the use of foci counting would result in reasonable accuracy only in a limited dose range of a few Gy.Our results are found to be supportive for the basic assumptions on which GLOBLE is built.Apart from giving new insights into the H2AX phosphorylation process, experiments performed at high doses are of relevance in the context of radiation therapy, where hypo-fractionated schemes become increasingly popular.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt, Germany.

ABSTRACT
We present here an analysis of DSB induction and processing after irradiation with X-rays in an extended dose range based on the use of the γH2AX assay. The study was performed by quantitative flow cytometry measurements, since the use of foci counting would result in reasonable accuracy only in a limited dose range of a few Gy. The experimental data are complemented by a theoretical analysis based on the GLOBLE model. In fact, original aim of the study was to test GLOBLE predictions against new experimental data, in order to contribute to the validation of the model. Specifically, the γH2AX signal kinetics has been investigated up to 24 h after exposure to increasing photon doses between 2 and 500 Gy. The prolonged persistence of the signal at high doses strongly suggests dose dependence in DSB processing after low LET irradiation. Importantly, in the framework of our modelling analysis, this is related to a gradually increased fraction of DSB clustering at the micrometre scale. The parallel study of γH2AX dose response curves shows the onset of a pronounced saturation in two cell lines at a dose of about 20 Gy. This dose is much lower than expected according to model predictions based on the values usually adopted for the DSB induction yield (≈ 30 DSB/Gy) and for the γH2AX foci extension of approximately 2 Mbp around the DSB. We show and discuss how theoretical predictions and experimental findings can be in principle reconciled by combining an increased DSB induction yield with the assumption of a larger genomic extension for the single phosphorylated regions. As an alternative approach, we also considered in our model the possibility of a 3D spreading-mechanism of the H2AX phosphorylation around the induced DSB, and applied it to the analysis of both the aspects considered. Our results are found to be supportive for the basic assumptions on which GLOBLE is built. Apart from giving new insights into the H2AX phosphorylation process, experiments performed at high doses are of relevance in the context of radiation therapy, where hypo-fractionated schemes become increasingly popular.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Measured γH2AX dose response curve.γH2AX fluorescence intensity measured with flow cytometry 1 h after X-rays irradiation of AGD and CHO cells; error bars show standard error of the mean for four independent samples. Fluorescence intensity is in arbitrary units.
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pone.0129416.g005: Measured γH2AX dose response curve.γH2AX fluorescence intensity measured with flow cytometry 1 h after X-rays irradiation of AGD and CHO cells; error bars show standard error of the mean for four independent samples. Fluorescence intensity is in arbitrary units.

Mentions: The dose response curve measured 1 h after irradiation, up to a dose of 140 Gy is shown in Fig 5 for AGD and CHO cells. Differences in the absolute values for a given dose between the two cell lines can be due to slight differences in genome content and/or in H2AX abundance, as well as in chromatin organization [1]. In both curves, a similar behaviour for increasing doses is observed. Specifically, the dose response starts with the trend of a linear rise in fluorescence intensity up to a dose of about 10–20 Gy, followed by gradual bending of the curves, expressing the transition into a “saturation region”. This bending seems to be more pronounced for CHO cells, and shallower for AGD cells. At the same time, in the high dose region the curve appears almost flat for CHO, while a low but continuous increase in fluorescence intensity is measured with AGD cells. Remarkably, according to results shown in the past and obtained by using physical methods for DSB detection (i.e. sedimentation, gel electrophoresis or filter elution techniques) no saturation would be expected in the induction of DNA lesions in the dose range of interest here [47,48].


Induction and Processing of the Radiation-Induced Gamma-H2AX Signal and Its Link to the Underlying Pattern of DSB: A Combined Experimental and Modelling Study.

Tommasino F, Friedrich T, Jakob B, Meyer B, Durante M, Scholz M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Measured γH2AX dose response curve.γH2AX fluorescence intensity measured with flow cytometry 1 h after X-rays irradiation of AGD and CHO cells; error bars show standard error of the mean for four independent samples. Fluorescence intensity is in arbitrary units.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4465900&req=5

pone.0129416.g005: Measured γH2AX dose response curve.γH2AX fluorescence intensity measured with flow cytometry 1 h after X-rays irradiation of AGD and CHO cells; error bars show standard error of the mean for four independent samples. Fluorescence intensity is in arbitrary units.
Mentions: The dose response curve measured 1 h after irradiation, up to a dose of 140 Gy is shown in Fig 5 for AGD and CHO cells. Differences in the absolute values for a given dose between the two cell lines can be due to slight differences in genome content and/or in H2AX abundance, as well as in chromatin organization [1]. In both curves, a similar behaviour for increasing doses is observed. Specifically, the dose response starts with the trend of a linear rise in fluorescence intensity up to a dose of about 10–20 Gy, followed by gradual bending of the curves, expressing the transition into a “saturation region”. This bending seems to be more pronounced for CHO cells, and shallower for AGD cells. At the same time, in the high dose region the curve appears almost flat for CHO, while a low but continuous increase in fluorescence intensity is measured with AGD cells. Remarkably, according to results shown in the past and obtained by using physical methods for DSB detection (i.e. sedimentation, gel electrophoresis or filter elution techniques) no saturation would be expected in the induction of DNA lesions in the dose range of interest here [47,48].

Bottom Line: The study was performed by quantitative flow cytometry measurements, since the use of foci counting would result in reasonable accuracy only in a limited dose range of a few Gy.Our results are found to be supportive for the basic assumptions on which GLOBLE is built.Apart from giving new insights into the H2AX phosphorylation process, experiments performed at high doses are of relevance in the context of radiation therapy, where hypo-fractionated schemes become increasingly popular.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Department of Biophysics, Darmstadt, Germany.

ABSTRACT
We present here an analysis of DSB induction and processing after irradiation with X-rays in an extended dose range based on the use of the γH2AX assay. The study was performed by quantitative flow cytometry measurements, since the use of foci counting would result in reasonable accuracy only in a limited dose range of a few Gy. The experimental data are complemented by a theoretical analysis based on the GLOBLE model. In fact, original aim of the study was to test GLOBLE predictions against new experimental data, in order to contribute to the validation of the model. Specifically, the γH2AX signal kinetics has been investigated up to 24 h after exposure to increasing photon doses between 2 and 500 Gy. The prolonged persistence of the signal at high doses strongly suggests dose dependence in DSB processing after low LET irradiation. Importantly, in the framework of our modelling analysis, this is related to a gradually increased fraction of DSB clustering at the micrometre scale. The parallel study of γH2AX dose response curves shows the onset of a pronounced saturation in two cell lines at a dose of about 20 Gy. This dose is much lower than expected according to model predictions based on the values usually adopted for the DSB induction yield (≈ 30 DSB/Gy) and for the γH2AX foci extension of approximately 2 Mbp around the DSB. We show and discuss how theoretical predictions and experimental findings can be in principle reconciled by combining an increased DSB induction yield with the assumption of a larger genomic extension for the single phosphorylated regions. As an alternative approach, we also considered in our model the possibility of a 3D spreading-mechanism of the H2AX phosphorylation around the induced DSB, and applied it to the analysis of both the aspects considered. Our results are found to be supportive for the basic assumptions on which GLOBLE is built. Apart from giving new insights into the H2AX phosphorylation process, experiments performed at high doses are of relevance in the context of radiation therapy, where hypo-fractionated schemes become increasingly popular.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus