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Socioeconomic determinants of birth registration in Ghana.

Amo-Adjei J, Annim SK - BMC Int Health Hum Rights (2015)

Bottom Line: Mother's education and household wealth are identified to be positively associated with the likelihood of a child being registered.In the context of structural factors, being a resident in the Eastern region of Ghana and rural areas were found to be risk factors for children not being registered.Besides, children who were resident in households where the head is affiliated to Traditional Religion were found to be at significant risk of being unregistered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Population and Health, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana. joshua.amo-adjei@ucc.edu.gh.

ABSTRACT

Background: Identity registration is not only a matter of human rights but it also serves as an important instrument for planning about health, education and overall development. This paper examines the chances of a child born in Ghana between 2001 and 2006 obtaining legal status of identity.

Methods: Data for this paper were extracted from the 2006 Ghana Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS). We used discrete choice modelling in estimating the likelihood of child registration in Ghana.

Results: Mother's education and household wealth are identified to be positively associated with the likelihood of a child being registered. In the context of structural factors, being a resident in the Eastern region of Ghana and rural areas were found to be risk factors for children not being registered. Besides, children who were resident in households where the head is affiliated to Traditional Religion were found to be at significant risk of being unregistered.

Conclusion: Overall, our findings give an impression of birth registration being a privilege for children whose parents are educated, wealthy and resident in urban communities. Policies meant to increase uptake have to be broad-based, targeting the less privileged particularly with practical interventions such as transport vouchers to registration centres. This may help appropriate meaning to international protocols on birth registration as a human right issue to which Ghana affirms.

No MeSH data available.


Bivariate relationship between child’s birth registration and age in Ghana
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig2: Bivariate relationship between child’s birth registration and age in Ghana

Mentions: To determine the variables that statistically influence identity registration, several equations were estimated and the results are presented in (Table 2). Model 1 suggests that age of a child is associated with the probability of registering the child at birth. Thus, older children are about 7 % likely to be registered. The probability remains stable at around 8 % in Models 2–5 and rises steadily to 11 % in Model 6. However, as evidenced in Fig. 2, the relationship between the probability of birth registration and a child’s age is non-linear. As shown in Fig. 2, at lower ages (in months) there is a higher likelihood of the child being registered but this diminishes as the child approaches 60 months. Figure 2 further indicates that the turning point where the child is less likely to be registered is about 24 months. Also, from Fig. 1, there is an indication that children are more likely to be registered just about the time they are turning 5 years old, perhaps to prepare them for formal schooling, which begins at age 6.Table 2


Socioeconomic determinants of birth registration in Ghana.

Amo-Adjei J, Annim SK - BMC Int Health Hum Rights (2015)

Bivariate relationship between child’s birth registration and age in Ghana
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4465725&req=5

Fig2: Bivariate relationship between child’s birth registration and age in Ghana
Mentions: To determine the variables that statistically influence identity registration, several equations were estimated and the results are presented in (Table 2). Model 1 suggests that age of a child is associated with the probability of registering the child at birth. Thus, older children are about 7 % likely to be registered. The probability remains stable at around 8 % in Models 2–5 and rises steadily to 11 % in Model 6. However, as evidenced in Fig. 2, the relationship between the probability of birth registration and a child’s age is non-linear. As shown in Fig. 2, at lower ages (in months) there is a higher likelihood of the child being registered but this diminishes as the child approaches 60 months. Figure 2 further indicates that the turning point where the child is less likely to be registered is about 24 months. Also, from Fig. 1, there is an indication that children are more likely to be registered just about the time they are turning 5 years old, perhaps to prepare them for formal schooling, which begins at age 6.Table 2

Bottom Line: Mother's education and household wealth are identified to be positively associated with the likelihood of a child being registered.In the context of structural factors, being a resident in the Eastern region of Ghana and rural areas were found to be risk factors for children not being registered.Besides, children who were resident in households where the head is affiliated to Traditional Religion were found to be at significant risk of being unregistered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Population and Health, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana. joshua.amo-adjei@ucc.edu.gh.

ABSTRACT

Background: Identity registration is not only a matter of human rights but it also serves as an important instrument for planning about health, education and overall development. This paper examines the chances of a child born in Ghana between 2001 and 2006 obtaining legal status of identity.

Methods: Data for this paper were extracted from the 2006 Ghana Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS). We used discrete choice modelling in estimating the likelihood of child registration in Ghana.

Results: Mother's education and household wealth are identified to be positively associated with the likelihood of a child being registered. In the context of structural factors, being a resident in the Eastern region of Ghana and rural areas were found to be risk factors for children not being registered. Besides, children who were resident in households where the head is affiliated to Traditional Religion were found to be at significant risk of being unregistered.

Conclusion: Overall, our findings give an impression of birth registration being a privilege for children whose parents are educated, wealthy and resident in urban communities. Policies meant to increase uptake have to be broad-based, targeting the less privileged particularly with practical interventions such as transport vouchers to registration centres. This may help appropriate meaning to international protocols on birth registration as a human right issue to which Ghana affirms.

No MeSH data available.