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An analysis of the adaptability of a professional development program in public health: results from the ALPS Study.

Richard L, Torres S, Tremblay MC, Chiocchio F, Litvak É, Fortin-Pellerin L, Beaudet N - BMC Health Serv Res (2015)

Bottom Line: This paper shows how a professional development program model can be adapted to different contexts while preserving its core components.Capturing the heterogeneity of the intervention's exposure, as was done here, will make possible in-depth impact analyses involving, for example, the testing of program-context interactions to identify program outcomes predictors.Such work is essential to advance knowledge on the action mechanisms of professional development programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: IRSPUM, Université de Montréal, P.O. Box 6128, Centre-ville Station, Montréal, QC, H3C 3 J7, Canada. Lucie.Richard@Umontreal.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: Professional development is a key component of effective public health infrastructures. To be successful, professional development programs in public health and health promotion must adapt to practitioners' complex real-world practice settings while preserving the core components of those programs' models and theoretical bases. An appropriate balance must be struck between implementation fidelity, defined as respecting the core nature of the program that underlies its effects, and adaptability to context to maximize benefit in specific situations. This article presents a professional development pilot program, the Health Promotion Laboratory (HPL), and analyzes how it was adapted to three different settings while preserving its core components. An exploratory analysis was also conducted to identify team and contextual factors that might have been at play in the emergence of implementation profiles in each site.

Methods: This paper describes the program, its core components and adaptive features, along with three implementation experiences in local public health teams in Quebec, Canada. For each setting, documentary sources were analyzed to trace the implementation of activities, including temporal patterns throughout the project for each program component. Information about teams and their contexts/settings was obtained through documentary analysis and semi-structured interviews with HPL participants, colleagues and managers from each organization.

Results: While each team developed a unique pattern of implementing the activities, all the program's core components were implemented. Differences of implementation were observed in terms of numbers and percentages of activities related to different components of the program as well as in the patterns of activities across time. It is plausible that organizational characteristics influencing, for example, work schedule flexibility or learning culture might have played a role in the HPL implementation process.

Conclusions: This paper shows how a professional development program model can be adapted to different contexts while preserving its core components. Capturing the heterogeneity of the intervention's exposure, as was done here, will make possible in-depth impact analyses involving, for example, the testing of program-context interactions to identify program outcomes predictors. Such work is essential to advance knowledge on the action mechanisms of professional development programs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Implementation pattern of Team C’s operational approach
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig3: Implementation pattern of Team C’s operational approach

Mentions: Figure 3 reveals that team C also adopted a unique sequence of activities within the HPL. Similarly to the other teams, activities aimed at specifying the operational approach (step 2) were carried out sporadically throughout the process. Activities devoted to transferring knowledge and mobilizing the organization (step 3b) were sustained consistently throughout the process. A particular feature of this team’s work was the development and concurrent implementation of four projects (instead of one) within the HPL. Thus, activities geared to the development of these projects (i.e., activities related to steps 4, 5, 6 and 7) were implemented almost continuously from the beginning to the end of the process.


An analysis of the adaptability of a professional development program in public health: results from the ALPS Study.

Richard L, Torres S, Tremblay MC, Chiocchio F, Litvak É, Fortin-Pellerin L, Beaudet N - BMC Health Serv Res (2015)

Implementation pattern of Team C’s operational approach
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4465469&req=5

Fig3: Implementation pattern of Team C’s operational approach
Mentions: Figure 3 reveals that team C also adopted a unique sequence of activities within the HPL. Similarly to the other teams, activities aimed at specifying the operational approach (step 2) were carried out sporadically throughout the process. Activities devoted to transferring knowledge and mobilizing the organization (step 3b) were sustained consistently throughout the process. A particular feature of this team’s work was the development and concurrent implementation of four projects (instead of one) within the HPL. Thus, activities geared to the development of these projects (i.e., activities related to steps 4, 5, 6 and 7) were implemented almost continuously from the beginning to the end of the process.

Bottom Line: This paper shows how a professional development program model can be adapted to different contexts while preserving its core components.Capturing the heterogeneity of the intervention's exposure, as was done here, will make possible in-depth impact analyses involving, for example, the testing of program-context interactions to identify program outcomes predictors.Such work is essential to advance knowledge on the action mechanisms of professional development programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: IRSPUM, Université de Montréal, P.O. Box 6128, Centre-ville Station, Montréal, QC, H3C 3 J7, Canada. Lucie.Richard@Umontreal.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: Professional development is a key component of effective public health infrastructures. To be successful, professional development programs in public health and health promotion must adapt to practitioners' complex real-world practice settings while preserving the core components of those programs' models and theoretical bases. An appropriate balance must be struck between implementation fidelity, defined as respecting the core nature of the program that underlies its effects, and adaptability to context to maximize benefit in specific situations. This article presents a professional development pilot program, the Health Promotion Laboratory (HPL), and analyzes how it was adapted to three different settings while preserving its core components. An exploratory analysis was also conducted to identify team and contextual factors that might have been at play in the emergence of implementation profiles in each site.

Methods: This paper describes the program, its core components and adaptive features, along with three implementation experiences in local public health teams in Quebec, Canada. For each setting, documentary sources were analyzed to trace the implementation of activities, including temporal patterns throughout the project for each program component. Information about teams and their contexts/settings was obtained through documentary analysis and semi-structured interviews with HPL participants, colleagues and managers from each organization.

Results: While each team developed a unique pattern of implementing the activities, all the program's core components were implemented. Differences of implementation were observed in terms of numbers and percentages of activities related to different components of the program as well as in the patterns of activities across time. It is plausible that organizational characteristics influencing, for example, work schedule flexibility or learning culture might have played a role in the HPL implementation process.

Conclusions: This paper shows how a professional development program model can be adapted to different contexts while preserving its core components. Capturing the heterogeneity of the intervention's exposure, as was done here, will make possible in-depth impact analyses involving, for example, the testing of program-context interactions to identify program outcomes predictors. Such work is essential to advance knowledge on the action mechanisms of professional development programs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus