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Quality of life during 5 years after stereotactic radiotherapy in stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

Ubels RJ, Mokhles S, Andrinopoulou ER, Braat C, van der Voort van Zyp NC, Aluwini S, Aerts JG, Nuyttens JJ - Radiat Oncol (2015)

Bottom Line: The physical functioning and the role functioning improved slowly (slope: 0.006 and 0.004, resp.) over the years and this was also significant (p < 0.0001).The emotional functioning (EF) improved significantly at 1 year compared to the baseline.QoL was maintained 5 years after SRT for stage I NSCLC and EF improved significantly.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Postbus 2040, 3000, Rotterdam, CA, the Netherlands. rutgerjubels@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To determine the long-term impact of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) on the quality of life (QoL) of inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Methods and materials: From January 2006 to February 2008, 39 patients with pathologically confirmed T1-2N0M0 NSCLC were treated with SRT. QoL, overall survival and local tumor control were assessed. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ)-C30 and the lung cancer-specific questionnaire QLQ-LC13 were used to investigate changes in QoL. Assessments were done before treatment, at 3 weeks, every 2-3 months during the first two years, and then every 6 months until 5 years after the treatment or death or progressive disease. The median follow up was 38 months.

Results: During the 5 years after treatment with SRT for stage I NSCLC, the level of QoL was maintained: There was a slow decline (slope: -0.015) of the global health status over the 5 years (p < 0.0001). The physical functioning and the role functioning improved slowly (slope: 0.006 and 0.004, resp.) over the years and this was also significant (p < 0.0001). The emotional functioning (EF) improved significantly at 1 year compared to the baseline. Two years after the treatment dyspnea slowly increased (slope: 0.005, p = 0.006). The actuarial overall survival was 62% at 2 years and 31% at 5-years.

Conclusion: QoL was maintained 5 years after SRT for stage I NSCLC and EF improved significantly. Dyspnea slowly increased 2 years after the treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Change in mean QLQ-LC13 dyspnea, coughing and fatigue scores.
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Fig2: Change in mean QLQ-LC13 dyspnea, coughing and fatigue scores.

Mentions: Changes in QLQ-C30 mean global health status (GH) and function scores (EF, PF and RF) during follow-up are shown in Figure 1. Changes in QLQ-LC13 mean symptom scores (dyspnea, coughing and fatigue) are shown in Figure 2. During the first year, the global health status was near the baseline value, improved to a score of 4 at 18 months and then significantly declined (slope: −0.015) to the baseline value during the next years. The PF score as well as the role functioning (RF) significantly improved slowly (slope: 0.006 and 0.004, resp.) over the years. Due to the fluctuation of the EF score over the 5 years, the changes over time were not significant, but the mean EF score at 1 year was significantly different compared to the pretreatment score (p = 0.0003). The small rise (slope: 0.004) over time in the cognitive functioning was also significant (p = 0.004), but not the social functioning.Figure 1


Quality of life during 5 years after stereotactic radiotherapy in stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

Ubels RJ, Mokhles S, Andrinopoulou ER, Braat C, van der Voort van Zyp NC, Aluwini S, Aerts JG, Nuyttens JJ - Radiat Oncol (2015)

Change in mean QLQ-LC13 dyspnea, coughing and fatigue scores.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4465315&req=5

Fig2: Change in mean QLQ-LC13 dyspnea, coughing and fatigue scores.
Mentions: Changes in QLQ-C30 mean global health status (GH) and function scores (EF, PF and RF) during follow-up are shown in Figure 1. Changes in QLQ-LC13 mean symptom scores (dyspnea, coughing and fatigue) are shown in Figure 2. During the first year, the global health status was near the baseline value, improved to a score of 4 at 18 months and then significantly declined (slope: −0.015) to the baseline value during the next years. The PF score as well as the role functioning (RF) significantly improved slowly (slope: 0.006 and 0.004, resp.) over the years. Due to the fluctuation of the EF score over the 5 years, the changes over time were not significant, but the mean EF score at 1 year was significantly different compared to the pretreatment score (p = 0.0003). The small rise (slope: 0.004) over time in the cognitive functioning was also significant (p = 0.004), but not the social functioning.Figure 1

Bottom Line: The physical functioning and the role functioning improved slowly (slope: 0.006 and 0.004, resp.) over the years and this was also significant (p < 0.0001).The emotional functioning (EF) improved significantly at 1 year compared to the baseline.QoL was maintained 5 years after SRT for stage I NSCLC and EF improved significantly.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Postbus 2040, 3000, Rotterdam, CA, the Netherlands. rutgerjubels@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To determine the long-term impact of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) on the quality of life (QoL) of inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Methods and materials: From January 2006 to February 2008, 39 patients with pathologically confirmed T1-2N0M0 NSCLC were treated with SRT. QoL, overall survival and local tumor control were assessed. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ)-C30 and the lung cancer-specific questionnaire QLQ-LC13 were used to investigate changes in QoL. Assessments were done before treatment, at 3 weeks, every 2-3 months during the first two years, and then every 6 months until 5 years after the treatment or death or progressive disease. The median follow up was 38 months.

Results: During the 5 years after treatment with SRT for stage I NSCLC, the level of QoL was maintained: There was a slow decline (slope: -0.015) of the global health status over the 5 years (p < 0.0001). The physical functioning and the role functioning improved slowly (slope: 0.006 and 0.004, resp.) over the years and this was also significant (p < 0.0001). The emotional functioning (EF) improved significantly at 1 year compared to the baseline. Two years after the treatment dyspnea slowly increased (slope: 0.005, p = 0.006). The actuarial overall survival was 62% at 2 years and 31% at 5-years.

Conclusion: QoL was maintained 5 years after SRT for stage I NSCLC and EF improved significantly. Dyspnea slowly increased 2 years after the treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus