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A cross sectional study on the motivators for Asian women to attend opportunistic mammography screening in a private hospital in Malaysia: the MyMammo study.

Hassan N, Ho WK, Mariapun S, Teo SH - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that highly educated women, cited doctors, family and friends as their main motivators.Of those with only secondary school education, their main motivators were doctors.We propose that to improve uptake of screening mammography, awareness programmes should target both doctors and members of the public.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Research Initiatives Foundation, Sime Darby Medical Centre, 1 Jalan SS12/1A, Subang Jaya, 47500, Selangor, Malaysia. hashimah.hassan@carif.com.my.

ABSTRACT

Background: To date, because of limited budgets and lower incidence of breast cancer, the majority of Asian countries do not have population-based screening programmes, but instead offer opportunistic screening. However, there have been few studies which have assessed the motivators for women attending such programmes and the appropriateness of the programmes in terms of targeting women at risk.

Methods: We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study of 1,619 women aged 40 to 74 years attending a subsidized opportunistic screening mammogram from October 2011 to October 2013 at a private hospital in Malaysia. Breast cancer risk was estimated using the Gail Model and two-step cluster analysis was used to examine the motivators of attending screening.

Results: Although Malaysia comprises 54.5% Malay, 24.5% Chinese and 7.3% Indian, the majority of women in the MyMammo Study were Chinese (70.1%) and 99.2% had a <2% ten-year risk of breast cancer. The most commonly cited barriers were the perception of not being at risk and fear of painful mammography. We found that highly educated women, cited doctors, family and friends as their main motivators. Of those with only secondary school education, their main motivators were doctors.

Conclusions: Taken together, our results suggest the women attending opportunistic mammography screening in Asia are at low risk of breast cancer and this poses challenges to cost-effective and equitable strategies for cancer control. We propose that to improve uptake of screening mammography, awareness programmes should target both doctors and members of the public.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution for ten-year risk invasive breast cancer in participants of the MyMammo study. Low risk is defined by having 10-year risk of less than 2 % while high risk is defined by 2 % or greater risk of developing breast cancer in the next 10 years. The majority of women (n=1415, 97.3 %) were at low risk of breast cancer and 38 out of 1453 of women (2.7 %) is predicted to be at risk of developing invasive breast cancer in the next 10 years
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Fig1: Distribution for ten-year risk invasive breast cancer in participants of the MyMammo study. Low risk is defined by having 10-year risk of less than 2 % while high risk is defined by 2 % or greater risk of developing breast cancer in the next 10 years. The majority of women (n=1415, 97.3 %) were at low risk of breast cancer and 38 out of 1453 of women (2.7 %) is predicted to be at risk of developing invasive breast cancer in the next 10 years

Mentions: The MyMammo study is an opportunistic mammography screening programme established at a private hospital in the suburban area of Subang Jaya in Malaysia. The mean age was 50 years old, the majority of participants were Chinese [70.1 %], >90 % had secondary or tertiary education and 19 % were considered high income. The mean age of menarche was 13 years old and 84 % of women were parous, with a mean age of first live birth of 28 years old. Whilst 30 % of women had ever used oral contraceptives, less than 10 % had used hormone replacement therapy. Only 10 % of women report a family history of breast cancer and 9 % had previously had a breast biopsy. Twenty one percent of patients had previously had gynaecological surgery. Overall, the mean ten-year risk for women aged 40-79 was 0.77 %, ranging from 0.4 % to 14.4 %. The majority of women (n = 1453, 99.2 %) were estimated to have a <2 % risk of breast cancer, with only 0.8 % (n = 19) at 2 % risk (Fig. 1).Fig. 1


A cross sectional study on the motivators for Asian women to attend opportunistic mammography screening in a private hospital in Malaysia: the MyMammo study.

Hassan N, Ho WK, Mariapun S, Teo SH - BMC Public Health (2015)

Distribution for ten-year risk invasive breast cancer in participants of the MyMammo study. Low risk is defined by having 10-year risk of less than 2 % while high risk is defined by 2 % or greater risk of developing breast cancer in the next 10 years. The majority of women (n=1415, 97.3 %) were at low risk of breast cancer and 38 out of 1453 of women (2.7 %) is predicted to be at risk of developing invasive breast cancer in the next 10 years
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4465302&req=5

Fig1: Distribution for ten-year risk invasive breast cancer in participants of the MyMammo study. Low risk is defined by having 10-year risk of less than 2 % while high risk is defined by 2 % or greater risk of developing breast cancer in the next 10 years. The majority of women (n=1415, 97.3 %) were at low risk of breast cancer and 38 out of 1453 of women (2.7 %) is predicted to be at risk of developing invasive breast cancer in the next 10 years
Mentions: The MyMammo study is an opportunistic mammography screening programme established at a private hospital in the suburban area of Subang Jaya in Malaysia. The mean age was 50 years old, the majority of participants were Chinese [70.1 %], >90 % had secondary or tertiary education and 19 % were considered high income. The mean age of menarche was 13 years old and 84 % of women were parous, with a mean age of first live birth of 28 years old. Whilst 30 % of women had ever used oral contraceptives, less than 10 % had used hormone replacement therapy. Only 10 % of women report a family history of breast cancer and 9 % had previously had a breast biopsy. Twenty one percent of patients had previously had gynaecological surgery. Overall, the mean ten-year risk for women aged 40-79 was 0.77 %, ranging from 0.4 % to 14.4 %. The majority of women (n = 1453, 99.2 %) were estimated to have a <2 % risk of breast cancer, with only 0.8 % (n = 19) at 2 % risk (Fig. 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: We found that highly educated women, cited doctors, family and friends as their main motivators.Of those with only secondary school education, their main motivators were doctors.We propose that to improve uptake of screening mammography, awareness programmes should target both doctors and members of the public.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Research Initiatives Foundation, Sime Darby Medical Centre, 1 Jalan SS12/1A, Subang Jaya, 47500, Selangor, Malaysia. hashimah.hassan@carif.com.my.

ABSTRACT

Background: To date, because of limited budgets and lower incidence of breast cancer, the majority of Asian countries do not have population-based screening programmes, but instead offer opportunistic screening. However, there have been few studies which have assessed the motivators for women attending such programmes and the appropriateness of the programmes in terms of targeting women at risk.

Methods: We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study of 1,619 women aged 40 to 74 years attending a subsidized opportunistic screening mammogram from October 2011 to October 2013 at a private hospital in Malaysia. Breast cancer risk was estimated using the Gail Model and two-step cluster analysis was used to examine the motivators of attending screening.

Results: Although Malaysia comprises 54.5% Malay, 24.5% Chinese and 7.3% Indian, the majority of women in the MyMammo Study were Chinese (70.1%) and 99.2% had a <2% ten-year risk of breast cancer. The most commonly cited barriers were the perception of not being at risk and fear of painful mammography. We found that highly educated women, cited doctors, family and friends as their main motivators. Of those with only secondary school education, their main motivators were doctors.

Conclusions: Taken together, our results suggest the women attending opportunistic mammography screening in Asia are at low risk of breast cancer and this poses challenges to cost-effective and equitable strategies for cancer control. We propose that to improve uptake of screening mammography, awareness programmes should target both doctors and members of the public.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus