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Advances in surfaces and osseointegration in implantology. Biomimetic surfaces.

Albertini M, Fernandez-Yague M, Lázaro P, Herrero-Climent M, Rios-Santos JV, Bullon P, Gil FJ - Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal (2015)

Bottom Line: This layer produce some osseointegration yet the calcium phosphate layer will eventually dissolve and leave a gap between the bone and the dental implant, thus leading to osseointegration failure due to bacterial colonization.A new surface -recently obtained by thermochemical processes- produces, by crystallization, a layer of apatite with the same mineral content as human bone that is chemically bonded to the titanium surface.This surface can be an excellent candidate for immediate or early loading procedures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: C/ Avicena s/n, 41009 Sevilla, Spain, jvrios@us.es.

ABSTRACT
The present work is a revision of the processes occurring in osseointegration of titanium dental implants according to different types of surfaces -namely, polished surfaces, rough surfaces obtained from subtraction methods, as well as the new hydroxyapatite biomimetic surfaces obtained from thermochemical processes. Hydroxyapatite's high plasma-projection temperatures have proven to prevent the formation of crystalline apatite on the titanium dental implant, but lead to the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate (i.e., with no crystal structure) instead. This layer produce some osseointegration yet the calcium phosphate layer will eventually dissolve and leave a gap between the bone and the dental implant, thus leading to osseointegration failure due to bacterial colonization. A new surface -recently obtained by thermochemical processes- produces, by crystallization, a layer of apatite with the same mineral content as human bone that is chemically bonded to the titanium surface. Osseointegration speed was tested by means of minipigs, showing bone formation after 3 to 4 weeks, with the security that a dental implant can be loaded. This surface can be an excellent candidate for immediate or early loading procedures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Biomimetic surface. SEM images showing apatite nucleation directly on surfaces 3 days after immersion.
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Figure 1: Biomimetic surface. SEM images showing apatite nucleation directly on surfaces 3 days after immersion.

Mentions: This method can be said to provide a biomimetic surface, since the implant-covering sodium titanate layer can -thanks to Na+ ion bioactivity, and once it gets in contact with biological fluids- form on its own a hydroxyapatite layer without the need of osteoblasts taking part. This phenomenon has been proven both in-vitro and in-vivo by our research group, and accelerated osseointegration has been observed relative to untreated surfaces (28,37) (see Fig. 1).


Advances in surfaces and osseointegration in implantology. Biomimetic surfaces.

Albertini M, Fernandez-Yague M, Lázaro P, Herrero-Climent M, Rios-Santos JV, Bullon P, Gil FJ - Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal (2015)

Biomimetic surface. SEM images showing apatite nucleation directly on surfaces 3 days after immersion.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4464919&req=5

Figure 1: Biomimetic surface. SEM images showing apatite nucleation directly on surfaces 3 days after immersion.
Mentions: This method can be said to provide a biomimetic surface, since the implant-covering sodium titanate layer can -thanks to Na+ ion bioactivity, and once it gets in contact with biological fluids- form on its own a hydroxyapatite layer without the need of osteoblasts taking part. This phenomenon has been proven both in-vitro and in-vivo by our research group, and accelerated osseointegration has been observed relative to untreated surfaces (28,37) (see Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: This layer produce some osseointegration yet the calcium phosphate layer will eventually dissolve and leave a gap between the bone and the dental implant, thus leading to osseointegration failure due to bacterial colonization.A new surface -recently obtained by thermochemical processes- produces, by crystallization, a layer of apatite with the same mineral content as human bone that is chemically bonded to the titanium surface.This surface can be an excellent candidate for immediate or early loading procedures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: C/ Avicena s/n, 41009 Sevilla, Spain, jvrios@us.es.

ABSTRACT
The present work is a revision of the processes occurring in osseointegration of titanium dental implants according to different types of surfaces -namely, polished surfaces, rough surfaces obtained from subtraction methods, as well as the new hydroxyapatite biomimetic surfaces obtained from thermochemical processes. Hydroxyapatite's high plasma-projection temperatures have proven to prevent the formation of crystalline apatite on the titanium dental implant, but lead to the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate (i.e., with no crystal structure) instead. This layer produce some osseointegration yet the calcium phosphate layer will eventually dissolve and leave a gap between the bone and the dental implant, thus leading to osseointegration failure due to bacterial colonization. A new surface -recently obtained by thermochemical processes- produces, by crystallization, a layer of apatite with the same mineral content as human bone that is chemically bonded to the titanium surface. Osseointegration speed was tested by means of minipigs, showing bone formation after 3 to 4 weeks, with the security that a dental implant can be loaded. This surface can be an excellent candidate for immediate or early loading procedures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus